Do I need school to be...

a coach for creatives? with Samoa Blanchet

February 03, 2022 Alex Villacís Season 1 Episode 22
Do I need school to be...
a coach for creatives? with Samoa Blanchet
Show Notes Transcript

This is first episode of 2022 and it’s a really special one since we are talking to not only a creative but to a coach for creatives. As a creative herself, she has a love for play and for following her inner child and she bring that passion to her client and to help them achieve their goals faster than they could on their own. As an acceleration consultant helping creatives embrace their journeys, feel empowered, achieve their goals and follow their fascinations.

On this interview we spoke about:

  • Working with your inner child
  • What is the job of a coach or a consultant
  • How she found her current mentor and how she pushed her
  • The importance of knowing yourself when working with a coach.

Want to learn more about Kris? You should because he is awesome so here are some links:
Website
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Creative Mastery with Samoa Blanchet

Samoa’s book recommendation:
The Creative Self: Effect of Beliefs, Self-Efficacy, Mindset, and Identity (Explorations in Creativity Research) 

In an effort to make this podcast accessible, we make transcripts of every episode. You’ll find the transcripts on our website here, https://doineedschooltobe.buzzsprout.com

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Samoa Blanchet:

And on the way we're gonna like, blast music and laugh and like, have a great time on the way instead of like a silent car, right? Like you feel it trying to like focus, like trying to figure things out on your own, and trying to figure your directions out and all of that. It's like I'm in the passenger seat like, oh, make this turn. There's no shortcut. Let's go that way. Oh, do you like the song? Oh, why are you so quiet? What's going on? You know, like, we're lightening up the experience. And also making sure like you get there like,

Alex Villacis:

Hello, friend. And welcome back to another episode of joining, it's going to be the podcast in which me Alex is going to sit down with creatives and ask them about their journey into the creative field, focusing on their education, the teachers who shaped them, the books are shaped in the movies in general, what their journey was like. If you're somebody who is thinking about entering the creative field, I hope this show will be a resource to you, and show you that we all have different paths. And they are all valid. So let's go. Welcome to the first episode of 2022. Yes, we're back. It's been a while. I promised on the last episode that I will be back mid January. But it kind of wasn't possible because I get COVID and wasn't feeling that my best. And then I had to catch up on things. But I am back making great episodes for you. And I'm very excited for this one. This is a conversation with someone Blanchett, who is not only a creative, but also a coach for creatives. My own personal feelings about coaches are very complicated, and we addressed them on this episode. But I just love that I love someone's energy. I think it's a great episode full of tips and insights. And he really gives a different view about the creative journey that we'd haven't touched on so far in the episode. So I really hope you enjoy it. And let's just begin with my conversation with someone Blanchett. And we're recording. So hi, someone. How are you today?

Samoa Blanchet:

Hi, Alex. Great. I'm excited to be here.

Alex Villacis:

And I'm excited to have you it's it's been a it's been a while we have been working on this on on scheduling this for a couple of weeks now. So I'm very excited that we have finally are here, looking at each other through a screen. little intro by yourself. Would you tell the audience who you are what you do?

Samoa Blanchet:

Hi. So my name is Samoa. I'm a creative mastery expert. I specifically work with people who have really creative businesses and ideas who want to accelerate and amplify the kinds of results their business gets. And I do that by leveraging their own creative mind and allowing them to just be a lot more playful and like experience their mind the power of their creative mind more effectively.

Alex Villacis:

Like how did you get into these programmes into helping creatives this way? What was your journey here? Um,

Samoa Blanchet:

so my first business is actually a graphic design business. I kind of started it by accident, like it was just like, Ah, screw it, I'll just start my own business. And it it took off. And I ended up speaking to a fellow web designer, and we were just having a conversation. And she was telling me about her web design business and like, how she could grow it and talk and whatnot. And then she ended up telling me about this kind of like side business that she had as where she designed toys. And her face lit up. When she started talking about it. He could tell she was really passionate about it. And I was like, Well, why aren't you focusing on that more like, you seem more excited? And she was like, Well, you know, I don't really like, I don't know, like, it doesn't make that much money, etc, etc. And I was like, okay, but this is like a multi million dollar idea. Like, if you really focused on it, you could make multi multiple millions of dollars really quickly. And she was like, You think so? And I was like, yeah, and she was like, will you help me? Like, will you consult with me? And I was like, Sure. So I started consulting with her and what she was like launching a new total toy line and everything. So it was perfect timing, because I'm really great at launches. And she was able to make what she thought she was gonna make in a year with like, what her goal was to make in a year. She made it in three weeks with our work together. Yeah. And

Alex Villacis:

never guested luck cast, it's an auditory medium, so you can not see me. But my jaw dropped. My jaw dropped intensely. A small visual to the people listening to this, my jaw dropped and I actually hit the table and I am very injured right now. Because the idea of making the work of a year in three weeks is amazing. Please tell me how you did this.

Samoa Blanchet:

Right. So the mic and this is what I've done it multiple times after that, because I started I started I was like, Whoa, like my face was the same. It was like haha, and it was one deal to one person like it was like ridiculous. And so I and then I was like I wonder if I could Do this again like with other people, so I started marketing it and like, people started hiring me. And now I'm here. So the more I worked with people, the more my work developed, and I was able to like, actually put a method to the madness, because at first I was like, I don't know how this is happening, it just is. Um, but what I've noticed now is like, it's really the concept is actually really simple. So when we grow, when we grew up, we all end up growing up becoming adults, but we're, we don't actually grow up, there's always like this child inside of us, it just wants to play. But what society has taught us to do is like, not listen to that child, because it's not productive. And it doesn't help us do this. But what I've noticed is that the child, that child is actually what leads us to the fastest growth in all areas of our life. And it's because he has such a playful energy, it's not really attached to anything. So it creates so much freedom and so much potential, which means you can literally create and have anything you want in your life, or in your business, whatever it is. So with this perspective, when I work with my clients, I'm always looking at ways that they're not being playful enough in their business. So it's like, where are they attaching themselves to certain things, because usually, like, there cannot be play with attachment. So as soon as they like you're attached to something, and you're like, frustrated, you're feeling frustrated, and you're feeling stuck, and you're feeling all those feelings, you already know, you're not being creative, and you're not being playful. So when I consult with my clients, those are the things I'm looking at both how they're doing. And mostly we're focused on their business. So we're looking at how they're doing it in their business. And usually what happens with that client, for example, she was a very attached to a specific marketing strategy, she was like, This is how all the experts are doing it, this is how I should do it. This is what's gonna get me the results I want. But throw right together, literally like two or three sessions. I started challenging her, and like, pushing her like, outside of that this box that she had built for herself. Um, in terms of like marketing, I was like, how can we make this more fun? How can you and it's like, it didn't seem like the strategy she was doing. Not only was it not working as well, she was also like, not having fun with it, she was just like doing it because she felt she had to. So I was pushing her and like, challenging her to think outside of any box, like to not even have a box in terms of how she could mark it. And this to think about the simplest thing that she could think she could do. So she came up, this was not my idea. And this is why I love my work. Because yes, I can brainstorm with you and maybe share some ideas and perspectives. But really my work is more under like, why don't we go under the hood. So like you start and it almost like jumpstart your creative mind for you. Because what ends up, what ended up happening is she came up with this idea out of the blue, she was like, Wait, there's a subscription box company that like in my in this in the industry I'm in? And I feel like if I pitch them, like I could probably get in like, do you think I should wait until like I'm bigger? Or do you think I should do it now? And I was like, why would you wait like just follow the dopamine follow the inspiration. So she emailed them just send them a very simple email talking about her product, which I said was a multi million dollar idea. So she was talking about her product. And the company immediately responded and was like, Yes, we're in we'd love to order 10,000 10,000 units for our next for our next box. And they paid her, basically. And that was how she was able to launch everything.

Alex Villacis:

It's so simple. And that's kind of the dream. That's also kind of the dream. It's, it sounds to me, like you're I like I have a conflicted relationship with coaches. I think and I have said this before openly on the internet, that a lot of coaches are con people. They're just selling I'm selling ideologies, to solve complicated problems. But to me, it sounds like you're more on the I am going to find I'm going to work with you in finding what is your curiosity? And what is your idea and I'm gonna make like push you to do it. Because I think a lot of coaches going like, Oh, you have to be on that Instagram and Tiktok and LinkedIn. What if they don't fit you? What if they don't fit who you are as a person?

Samoa Blanchet:

Exactly. And that's the biggest thing for me. i That's why I don't even I don't even call myself a coach anymore. I see. I see myself doing just more consulting in a way because I'm talking to you like I'm telling okay, what do you want? What do you what is it you want to create? What is your goal? Oh, I want to do XYZ and it's like, okay, well now, why haven't you created because I've always been of the mindset and this is how children think, by the way, whatever you want. You can have it like as long as it exists. You can have it. It's like as we grew up, we're told oh no, it takes time. No, it takes money. Oh no, it takes all this extra stuff that gets in the way from like, the thing that you want and where you're at. So I think of it like a child, it's like, okay, you want this thing? So why don't you have it? What's in the way? And my, I'm always asking myself this question with my kids, even when I'm not with them, like, why don't they have this what's in the way what's in the way. And so with that curious and it's not from a like, it's very open, courteous space, because it can be anything, it can be something very logical and simple, like, the way they marketing or their messaging or their branding, or whatever, it could be the platform they're using, it could be that they're better off in person than online. Or it could be something in their in like, the way that they're perceiving money, or people or whatever, like, you can literally be anything. So when you're open to it, you can actually get the answer. And the thing is, like all of our minds, like, you don't actually need someone else to do this for you. Um, people just work with me because it's faster. And it's easier, because I'm good at this. But it's like all over it. Like when you start asking your mind that question, your mind will either tell you, or you'll like, have a conversation with someone and the answer will come through, like it might take a little bit longer for you to actually get it and then put it into practice. But all of us have access to this information. Like it's not something that like, Oh, I'm the only person who can do this for people, like all of us can do this for ourselves, and we do it for each other even. It's just that when someone specialises in it, they do it better and faster, and all that. Um, so yeah, like the whole, like coaching, like just teaching concepts that don't actually work or help and or like doing the one size fits all approach. It never worked for me when I hired coaches that never worked for me. So I was very, I've always been very intentional about making sure that the and understanding that the fastest way to creating what you want, is always going to come from the way that works best for you. It's never going to come from my journey or from someone else's journey, it's always going to be what's most aligned with your play. Like, what's the most playful thing for you to do?

Alex Villacis:

That is that that is so deep. And it sounds so interesting, because you're not coming from this is how I did it copy my method is how you it's more like it's about you. Let's go deep and figure out who you are, and how you can do it. And how were you always curious about play? And because you're mentioned like how children learn how children think we're always curious about that, or is it something that you discovered later? Or how did that work?

Samoa Blanchet:

I think for me, um, I've never lost my play. Um, I've always been like a very, I've always been a risk taker. I moved out of my parents house at 18, even though I was super sheltered, had, like, I moved to a new city where I knew nobody and I had no job or anything. And I literally and like no savings, nothing. I just wanted to move. So I moved. So I've always been the kind of person that just kind of like follows whatever thing I want to do, like I'm just I and like, figure out the consequences. And I'm always like, I've always been fine. Like it's never been like, Oh my God, that's not not like I've always been fine no matter what, what happened. So it really built myself trust. So that perspective of like being playful, like playing with things and being curious about, like, what could I do? Or what could I try? I think it's just something that I refuse to let go of, even though again, people tried to take it away from me, it was just like, no, like, This is mine. I am not letting this go. Um, because again, I think it's something that everybody has it like we've had, we had it when we're children, it's just that to a certain degree, we end up forgetting how to like, engage with that side of us. And then of course, when life gets hard and like you go through challenges, because that happens even with me, when I go through challenges or like it's hard. It's really easy to forget to play, it's really easy, because it's like now you have to put your adult hat on and fix things and do things. But when in reality, adults have messed up everything, like every problem we have in society. And even our adult versions of us the one that's like, no, like, let's follow these rules and data a lot of times like we make it even harder for ourselves and we need to. So I hope that answered your question.

Alex Villacis:

No, I love that. And that resonates so much with me because I lived in the Netherlands. I used to live in Germany, and I was working full time and I I wasn't happy what I was doing. I said okay, I'll just like go and do something else. And I figured out I'm gonna move to Atlanta, I'm gonna go back to school, I'm gonna do all these things. And my co workers they were like, you're gonna just pick up and move to another country. So yeah, kind of. I've done it before. It was fine. Chances are like, that's the thing. They're horrible things that can happen to us. But chances are you're you're gonna be fine. You're most likely going it's gonna be a challenge. But that's part of the fun. It's it's fun to be challenged,

Samoa Blanchet:

right? Because you grow. That's how you grow. When you see each challenges, like that's what I try to do is like, when I see a challenge come up, I'm like, oh, a game, like a puzzle for me to solve. Okay, how do I solve this? Where do I go? And it's the same with my clients. They're like, Oh, this is a challenge I'm having. And I'm like, oh, yeah, okay. I'd love to play, let's play it together. It's not like, Oh, no challenge is bad. We need to push them away. What is wrong with you? Why are you going through challenges? Like, you're not that high vibe, you're not that done. If you're experiencing challenges, like, no, it's a normal part of life, especially if you're pushing yourself out of your comfort zone, and you're trying to grow and expand yourself. So once you see it like that, like, once you have that perspective, and you hold it, because it's really hard to like, let it go. Hard to like, hold it up. Once you have that perspective, and you keep it, you start, like, not only do things happen much more quickly for you, because we waste a lot of time, being frustrated and being angry and like things that are happening to us and whatnot. So once you have this different perspective, you're not spending all that time doing that. So you're not creating as many delays, but also your experience of life like and your quality of life just expands because you're not spending as much time being stressed about things, etc, etc. Like you're actually even enjoying the challenging parts of life.

Alex Villacis:

No toxic positivity, you're not saying there aren't challenges. It's like there are challenges. There are hard things. It's just let's look at it from a perspective that it's what can you do about it? It's not, there's no victim mentality of Oh, life is happening to me. It's like, no life is happening with you. And how are you going to tackle this? I think that's, I see so many coaches, they're like, Yeah, everything is good. Everything is great. No, some things are going to be hard.

Samoa Blanchet:

Yes. And you're just angry, are you gonna get this off, and you're gonna get frustrated and sad, you're gonna cry, you're gonna do all of these things, you're gonna have anxiety, it doesn't make you any less. Like, that's what makes you human. Like, that's the part. That's why you're here to like, experience all of it. These these emotions. And these experiences wouldn't be here if you weren't here to experience them. And like, if you really think about it, if you were happy all the time. Like, would you really enjoy happiness as much as you do when you finally experience it again? And all if you were, if you felt abundant all the time? Would you really enjoy that space of abundance as much if you never experienced that if you if you experience it all the time? No, the beauty of life is the variety. So I really oh god toxic positive positivity pisses me off. Like, I can't deal with people like that. I'm just like, no, like, that is extremely harmful to people's psyche. Because we like think, again, back to children, like, children cry, they throw tantrums, they scream, they get angry. They, and it's all part of the creative process. I have created such cool things and make so much money from anger. Literally, because somebody pissed me off. I started my first business because my boss pissed me off. And I was so angry, I started my business. And now I'm here. Now imagine if I was like, Well, I just need to be high vibe and positive all the time. And everything's happening for my own good. I mean, it was yes, but I still had a right to be pissed off. And I still had a right to like, respond in the way that I did. So yeah, I think there's definitely a balance of how you experience life. It's like, you don't go from it. Like you can be angry and not see yourself as a victim, you can be sad and you can be anxious even. And you can feel doubtful you can feel afraid, without seeing yourself as a victim. And you so you experience those emotions. And then when you when you felt all of it, you can be like, Okay, what am I going to do now? What do I want to do? Where do I want to go? And you follow that?

Alex Villacis:

I love that. There's there's this book I read like I have it like right there on above my bed. It is called Emotional agility by Susan David. And she talks about that the wide range of emotions that emotions just give you feedback. It's she tells his story, and I put in the podcast as much as I can. And I think it's really relevant right now. So she tells a story about how she was in another city away from her family when from her children. And because she had a conference that she was giving. And she felt very guilty and very angry at herself. Because she thought, Okay, why do I feel these things and one person will tell her like one perspective will be Oh, you're so ungrateful. You have this great opportunity you shouldn't feel this way. But she sat down and analyse So, so much that I feel guilty. Because being a mother comes before my business, and I am not with my children, because of my business. So I feel guilty. But I am here because of my children because I want to be able to provide for them. Right? So her guilt was just her knowing that what her values are that her values were that she's a mother first. And everything else comes later. Right? So it's just information and understand that if you're angry at something, it's because something it's important to you. Yes, not about something, it's because you love something, if you're excited about something because he likes something, it's just information, but we're taught we're taught, we're taught are those sorts of British accent for no reason that some emotions are good, and some of which are bad. But sounds like in your work. You're you're welcoming the whole spectrum of life. It's not just the positive parts also channelizing everything into a creative career into a productive creative career.

Samoa Blanchet:

Yes, exactly. Because all of it, like when my client, for example, I've had clients, and these are powerful people doing really great work. But they they'll get into like kind of a rut and they feel powerless. They're frustrated, because they're used to feeling, you know, powerful, and like they can do anything, but they feel powerless. And, you know, they'll come to me, and they'll be like, you know, this is how I feel. And I'm frustrated. I'm this and I'm not. And I'm just like, okay, and you'll, and it's so crazy how they'll because like a lot of these people have had coaches and mentors that they've worked with and whatnot. So it's really interesting to see how they respond because they're like, Okay, and I'm like, yeah, they're like, you're not gonna tell me that I shouldn't feel this way. Like, I shouldn't act, like be saying, these are this perspective. And I was like, Well, why would I do like, how is that helpful? Like, how would mean judging you or shaming you for experience for having this experience? help you. And they're always like, because they're judging and shaming themselves. So it gives and what happens when you because it's like, this is what I mean by those, those are the choices that create the delays. It's like, if you having an experience, and you're adding judgement, and you're adding shame to it, you're going to have the experience for a lot longer than if you seek to understand the experience and go, Why am I experiencing this way? Why am I experiencing powerlessness? For example, why do I feel that way? Um, okay, so this is the situation, this is what I'm attaching to the situation, these are my attachments. This is this, this is that. So when you see them, you understand yourself better. And you'll learn something about yourself, like maybe what your values are, like you said, or what you're truly passionate about what you truly care about. But sometimes you'll start realising Oh, there's a redirection happening. Oh, like, I actually want to go this way. That's why I feel frustrated with this. And like, but because your your, your, your attention is going to something different. It's, it's seeking to understand yourself better, instead of judging yourself. And when you understand yourself better, you're able to, again, follow the dopamine, you're able to follow what you're like your creative mind is really leading you to, because a lot of times when that happens, it's just calling you to make a change, like something needs to change if you're frustrated, or whatever. And things aren't flowing the way you were used to, or you want them to, somebody just needs to change. And so when you approach it from a curious space, instead of a judgmental space, you're actually able to figure out what that is much more quickly so you can lead back into action.

Alex Villacis:

Hey, friend, it's Alex just interrupting this conversation to remind you that in order to have the optimal experience, and enjoy all the links in the show notes, you can subscribe to the show on any platform you're using to listen to this podcast. And yeah, it supports the show, he will improve the algorithm for you. So he will show you more shows like this one that you will potentially like. And if you wish to support the show, you can follow us on social media. All the links are in the show notes as well as a link to buy me a coffee, which Yeah, will help pay for the hosting. And I also love coffee. But enough my babble, let's get back to the show. Wow. Sounds so logical. But I know a lot of people would not think about it. It's very, it's really crazy. It's really crazy. And so now you mentioned that your clients had coaches before and they you have had coaches before. Could you tell me some stories about good coaches that you have? Maybe not so great coaches that you had, and your teachers and how that worked out?

Samoa Blanchet:

Yeah, so I've had three coaches like in like from business, I've had many mentors before, like teachers who have taken me under their wing, but in terms of coaches, I've had three. My first one really introduced me to the coaching world, which was cool. Um, she was a bit abusive. Um, I don't think she meant to be I don't think it was like intentional, but again, like she was very like, there was a lot of judgement and shame from her. And so eventually Like I ended, I ended up like it turned out like, after being in close relationship with her, I literally stopped making money because my child was not present because she was being abused. So, um, I ended up stopping me, I stopped making money, and we stopped working together. Then my second coach, I worked with her for just two months. Um, she was absolutely brilliant. Like she had, she had, she had an incredibly brilliant perspective on everything. And she helped me kind of get out of the rut that I was in from the last mentorship relationship. But she was also abusive, she wasn't, I didn't experience her abuse myself, because I guess I kind of like felt it. So I kind of got out as soon as I could. Um, but I've had, I've actually worked with people who had worked with her in the past, who were literally healing from her abuse. Um, so I have noticed that a lot of abusive coaches and mentors, and then, um, my third mentor, like I've been working with her for over two years now I'm still working with her, I love her. She's amazing. Um, I've learned so much from her, she her perspective is actually approaching everything with unconditional love. And it's really so not only has she modelled that, which means no abuse, yay. So she's modelled that, but um, I've also like, in like, and like integrated that into my own practice with consulting with people just to like, be there with them, like, and not just people, but like everyone in my life, like not just clients, but everyone in my life and how I treat myself. I've grown a lot in that because of her perspectives. And I'm really, really grateful to have matter.

Alex Villacis:

That's amazing. Do you have any? Do you have any tips? Or how do you find a coach that works? Because I think it's also very important. It's kind of like finding a therapist that works for you and need to align very well. What should you look out for? Like, how long should you wait to check in or check out from a coach? Like, I think these are questions that there's so many coaches out there right now, like, how do you know how to find a good one? When do you like, check in with yourself about because a coach is gonna make you uncomfortable? Like a coach is going to challenge you that I think I chose a coach should challenge you. When do you know? Or do you have an internal compass for it? Or how does

Samoa Blanchet:

that work? So for me, like, I don't have a set, like oh, like, I'm gonna decide for wait this long to before hiring someone or whatever, I don't really have a set system. It's more like, I've always when it comes to any relationship, especially any intimate relationship, I built a very good relationship with my body. Because my body will often know things before I consciously do. So like it will feel uncomfortable or, or like, um, and not uncomfortable, because the person is like, challenging me, but uncomfortable with the person. So for example, the mentor before this is gonna be a little funny. But the mentor before this one, whenever I would get on a call with her, I was like a ball of anxiety, and literally felt like I needed to poop, like right before. And it was just like anxiety. And at first I thought I was like, oh, it's because she's going to challenge me to grow. But no, I was terrified of her, like terrified of her judgement, terrified of what she might say to me, or how she might respond to me, you know, I'm terrified of doing something wrong. My mentor has pushed me that my current mentor has pushed me so far out of my comfort zone, but I have never felt like a ball of anxiety when getting on a call with her anything because again, she literally like, does her best to embody that space of unconditional love. So in terms of looking for a coach, I can say like, when I transitioned to this one to finding the coach for me, um, I was in the space like, I just felt like I didn't really want to be working with the person I was working with anymore. Like, I felt that and I honoured that before it got any anything happened. Like I didn't wait for something, usually wait for something bad to happen before we decide to move on with any relationship. But I was like, okay, like, I'm not really feeling this anymore. I'm not really I didn't really want to engage with her anymore. So even though I was still in like her group and whatnot, I just kind of like put a little distance I didn't show up because there were mastermind calls, so I didn't show up on the mastermind calls as much. And I was kind of just like looking for someone else. So I I jumped on a few calls with people who like, caught my eye and caught my interest. I didn't really know what I was looking for. Really, I was just kind of like I'm looking for somebody. So if you can get more clear on what kind of guidance you're you're seeking or what kind of person you're seeking, that might help but I had no idea I was just like, I'll know what what I'm what I'm looking for when I find it. And I would get on calls with people and they would we would talk and they would tell me how much and I just be like yeah, you know, like There was no desire to like work with them. No real true. Like, yes. You know, like that feeling. That's what I was looking for. And then with my mentor, my current mentor, what actually happened was, I was scrolling through Facebook, and I saw her posts. And it was just like, yes. I don't even remember what the post was about. I don't even think I really read it. I just there was something about her that I was like, yes. So I started looking through her stuff, and I couldn't find her prices on her website. And I was like, Ah, screw it. I knew she was marketing this one month intensive. So I messaged her, and I was like, hey, I'm interested in your one month intensive. And in my head, it was gonna be like, a few dollars, a couple $1,000. I was like, okay, I can afford it, whatever. And she's like, oh, like, it's $10,000 for the month, and I was like, Oh,

Alex Villacis:

I genuinely thought you're gonna say, Oh, it's $200. And you're like, relieved? Oh, my. This really took me for a turn.

Samoa Blanchet:

Yeah, Q anxiety. It's $10,000 for the month, you can do a deposit with a 5k. So we can start and then the other 5k would be due in like three weeks. And I was just like, oh, okay, well, um, I'll be right back. Like, I'll be back in like, maybe a month or so I'm gonna go try to get the money deposit. And she was like, No, I'm, if you're gonna start, like, you're gonna, like, make a commitment now. And I was like, I'm not really sure I could do that. I don't know, I literally at the time, I had, like, $200 in my bank account. So there was I was like, I can't, how do I know? And she was like, How much money do you have, and I was like, I have $200 in my bank account. And she was like, okay, so you can send that as a deposit to reserve your spot. And then you'll have $1,300 due in two days. And then the rest of it will be due in a week. And I was just like, you're speaking a different language. I'm not sure how you think I'm going to turn $200 and into 5000. And like the leak, I don't know how that's gonna happen. Especially because I was making like an average of like, two or $3,000 a month that at the time. Um, and she was like, do it. And I kind of like thought about it. And I was just like, honestly, I could and like, I really want to work with her. Like, I don't want to wait anymore. I don't like I'm kind of tired of this, I do want the support. So I just sent her I was like, here's, here's the 200 I'm, I'm gonna freak out. I'm gonna go freak out a little bit, and then I'll be back.

Alex Villacis:

Gonna go have a mental breakdown,

Samoa Blanchet:

yes. But it's our only emotions. And two days later, somebody messaged me, they're like, I want to work with you. At the time, I was selling something for $1,500. And she paid me 1500, I paid the 1300 I owed. And then I actually paid her the $5,000 deposit early. Like I was able to pay her early. Because I was kind of in the space of just like, focus, I was like, I'm making this money. And so I did, and I was able to pay her. So that's how the relationship started. And I don't regret it one bit, it was a little stress. It was no, it was very stressful. That was it was a very stressful week for me. And I was really anxious because I'm the type of person if I say I'm going to do something, I'm going to do it. Um, so yeah, definitely challenged and pushed out of my comfort zone. And that didn't feel too good. But you can tell in your body when someone's abusing you. And when it's like, they're just challenging you. And then another thing to watch out for when you are in those kinds of relationships. Ask yourself the question. Do you feel comfortable communicating your discomfort with the person? So with my mentor? Yeah. Because if it's if it's a healthy relationship dynamic, you will feel uncomfortable and say I'm uncomfortable. And the way that person responds, is going to tell you a lot about what kind of person they are. If they respond by shaming you or judging you, that's abuse. That's abuse. If they are like I understand that is completely fine. And they allow you to like prompt like why do you feel uncomfortable? What's coming up for you what's going on where they're seeking to understand you and help you understand yourself? They don't have an agenda. They're not trying to push you to do the thing. They're really just have like challenging you to understand yourself more deeply. So you feel empowered to make the right choices. That is a healthy dynamic with a coach because your coach is never like a lot of cool. I feel like this is where the abuse part comes in. A lot of coaches feel like they're like God Almighty, like What they say goes basically. And that like there's only one right way to do things where as a true coach guide, mentor consultant understands that their perspective is just one perspective, they don't know what's good for you, they don't know what's right for you, they just have one perspective, based off of the their experiences and the information that they have. So they will share your purse their perspective with you, because you're paying them for that like, meaning you value it. But in the end, it's always your choice, what you do with that, you can take it or you cannot take it. And you can also communicate what resonates and what does it and because I've done that with my mentor, where she would guide me towards something. And at first, I agree. But after taking it in for a little bit, I noticed resistance. And I be like, Okay, why am I resisting? So I may not know why, but I'll just tell her I'm noticing resistance to this. Can you help me figure out why? And she'll ask me questions or give me examples or scenarios. And then I can actually see like, what feel what resonates with me, and what does it and go oh, I think this is it. And I made a different decision than what she guided me to. But it felt even more empowering and actually helped me grow even more. So it's really like, like our is your sovereignty being honoured in your relationship with your mentor? If it's not, then it's probably not healthy relationship.

Alex Villacis:

I think it's interesting. And I love that. You said like, I'm feeling resistance, and you didn't even know what to what order or why and your coach like help you work that. Okay. Why are you feeling is because many times we have those gut feelings because like, I don't, I don't like I don't know why. And it's like, okay, there's going to be a bit of an off topic. Do you know, sociopaths and psychopaths?

Samoa Blanchet:

I don't know the difference. Yeah. So

Alex Villacis:

it's interaction. So that it's like how, like, as far as you understand, a sociopath will never act in a psychopath will. Oh, okay. And but we as neurotypicals with earth, not sociopath or not psychopaths, we have an instinctive fear for them, like we like we will feel that their energy that their brains works differently, and we will have that gut feeling inside of us. And that's instinct, that's pure anger. And that's just us that our bodies detecting a threat, right. And we don't understand why we may not know that person, we just, it's not even how they look, it's how they feel. It's an internal thing. And it sounds like you're you're on you're honouring that you're honouring that your body knows, like, your instinct, like, the conscious part of our brain is actually very small compared to the subconscious part, which is picking up everything around you. Mm hmm. So it sounds like you're, you're recommending somebody that gives you the space to say like, Hey, this is not okay. I don't know why I don't know what's happening right now. But maybe you can help me figure it out.

Samoa Blanchet:

Yes, cuz that's, that's really what their job is and what they're there for. Um, so it's like, if you don't feel safe doing that with someone that you're entrusting with guiding you through your growth and whatnot, because part of your growth is understanding yourself more deeply and feeling empowered by your decisions. So if you're kind of just in the space of just doing what you're doing, and making the choices you are because your mentor told you to or your coach told you to, or you're not really checking in with yourself to see if it aligns with you, then that's not empowering for you. And it actually creates codependence with the person. But what you're really seeking is an interdependent relationship, where you trust the person, you trust, their advice, you want their guidance, and you also trust yourself and your own advice and your own guidance. And those two things can come together to broaden your perspective and broaden your experiences. And, um, get kind of like the point is like, just to get you there faster, and have a better experience of whatever it is that you're going to experience. So um, that's why like, I feel empowered, making my own choices, even if they like, don't necessarily align with what my mentor initially suggested that I do. Because this literally happened like last week where I was talking to her about a situation I was in, and it was actually a personal relationship. And I didn't know what to do with it, like, should I end it? Should I like, do this? Should I do that? And she actually suggested that I ended it. And I was just like, Yeah, and like, we talked about it. And I even convinced myself as to why it was a good decision to end it. So I was just like, in this space of like, Yeah, I'm gonna end it, screw it, screw that person. And I was like, super, quote unquote, empowered about it. But then when we got off the call, I thought about it. I was just like, there's something that feels off about this. There's something that feels unfair about this. And when I really and I couldn't figure it out, and I spoke to my mentor, and she was like, Do you feel like this person is giving you something that you're missing? And I was like, no, like, that's not what it is. Like she was asking me certain questions to see like Do I have like specific attachments to this person? And I was like, No, that's not that's not really it, I already checked in with myself. And that's not there. Like, I feel like, I'd be fine if I ended the relationship, but it just feels wrong to do that. Um, and so when we thought about when we talked about, it's more, I was like, Oh, it feels wrong, because I feel like I'm coming from just my perspective. And I didn't actually communicate with this person, like, how would they did hurt hurt me, or, or how it made me feel. And I honestly feel like it wasn't their intention. And I want to kind of give them a chance to like, both like, not just like explain themselves, but also like change their behaviour, if they like to commit to doing that, if that's what they wanted. If that's not what they want, then I feel a lot better ending the relationship. And so I got, I came to that conclusion. And she was like, so go do that. And that is what I did. And I'm so grateful that I did, because I was going to end this relationship. But I wasn't really I didn't really want to end because I was angry. And like, I didn't want to come from that space. So um, I wanted to come from the space of love. So, um, she got me there, like, I don't, I might have gotten that to that point, maybe, but probably would have taken even longer. Or I might have just been like, Ah, screw it, I'm not even gonna listen to that side of myself, I'm just gonna end this, and it just would have ended it because it would have actually been more comfortable for me to do that.

Alex Villacis:

Wow, that is that is so deep and sounds like also like a coach, like you have a coach or a mentor and a mentor really, that it's not only there, it's not going to tell you Yeah, that's not my side. That's not my field, that's, I'm here for you at this level, I'm not here. And that's something that we talk about in the podcast a lot when it comes to teachers, that there are teachers that will limit themselves to just their subject or just their scenario. But they're they're really special ones, the ones that stay with you that go a little bit further than that. I had I was interviewing this woman named Esther, who was a teacher in Spain. And she was a teacher that all the troublemakers in class liked. And an art teacher asked her like, how do you do this? Like, how, why do they like you when they respect you. She just said, I just learned their names. I just I just I just I just speak to them by their names. I don't call them you or troublemaker or anything. I just call them out. If I see them on the hall, I'll say hi to them by name. They exist for me like they know that they exist next is for them. So we're I'm not just a teacher, I am the teacher that knows your names. Like it's just going that little bit extra mile. And it's beautiful. And how do you do with your like when I create because creatives were very erratic minded, I say like, we want everything. We want everything and we won it now, how do you approach coaching a person? That is it? We also we're all in our fields. We're also in our fields all the time? How are you as a coach, you invoke that inner child? Yes, but how do you I don't know, operate that very chaotic machine. That is a creative mind. Yeah, I was saying

Samoa Blanchet:

I'm very like the relationship I have with my clients can get really deep and really intimate. So it's really important to me that I work with people like I enjoy working with, and we're working on things that excite me also and that I believe in. Because, honestly, that's how my brain works too. If I'm not really excited, then I can't really give you any much helpful guidance in the first place. So that is really important. But also, it's important that my clients take responsibility for their work, because the results, what kinds of results that are possible with us partnering up together don't happen, if they're not in a space to like, take full responsibility for their own results. So that's another thing. It's like, you know, whatever the journey looks like, it's like for you to be in that space of like, I know, I'm responsible for my results. Samoa is just here to amplify and accelerate things. But either way, my results are like you have to be in this space of kind of like my results are. What's the word? Like they're going to happen anyways, like the life I want to build the result, I want to get the business I want to build like it's happening. It's inevitable. That's the word. It's inevitable. But I'm working, I'm working with Simola, because she has a perspective that I value that will that I believe will both accelerate this path and amplify the kinds of results I can get. But either way, I'm getting those results on my own. Like it doesn't matter who I work with or what I do. So they like usually my clients have this perspective already. So then when we start working together, no matter how chaotic they are, no matter what's going on in the backend, we're both on the same page around that your results are inevitable. I'm just here to like really just like challenge you and allow you to accelerate amplify that. So then what ends up happening is When there is chaos, because it's part of the journey, it's part of the whole creative, everything. When there is chaos, we're able to tackle it together. It's like a partnership really, like we're able to tackle the chaotic energy together. Because there's always a gift in the chaos. The funny thing is like, we'll see chaos. And we'll be like, Oh, no, like, we must, like, resist chaos and push it away. But there's always Oh my God, there's so much creativity in the chaos, it's really like sorting through it. And I'm really good at that. It's really sorting through all the chaos, whether it's the chaos of the emotions, or it's just like the creative chaos, it's really just sorting through all of it and finding the gift. And then leveraging the gift to again, create the acceleration that you want to have. And on the way we're gonna, like, blast music and laugh and like, have a great time on the way instead of like, a silent car, right? Like you feel it trying to like focus and like trying to figure things out on your own, and trying to figure your directions out and all of that. It's like, I'm in the passenger seat, like, oh, make this turn there. I know. Shrikant Let's go that way. Oh, do you like the song? Oh, why are you so quiet? What's going on? You know, like, we're lightening up the experience. And also making sure like you get there like, not that you get there. But like, you have a great experience while on the road. And you also maximise the potential that you actually have, like everything that you can actually create, you're just maximising it all, but you're already gonna do it on your own. Like, it's like, I'm not worried about my clients getting what, where they're gonna get, like, where they're gonna get, like, whether without me they're gonna get there. And how do you

Alex Villacis:

bring in rest? So you're in this car ride, and you're enjoying it? Do you ever tell them to stop the car and enjoy the view or stop for burgers? Because as creatives we always want to be making and creating and pushing and pushing and pushing? Do you ever have to tell somebody like, hey, enjoy the now enjoy the today enjoy these moments?

Samoa Blanchet:

Yes, I have to remind my clients in this all the time to like, remember to present, I don't tell them to necessarily stop. Um, because I don't think it's my place to tell them when to stop. But I just remind them to tune in with themselves. So it's like, I know, as a creative, I just kind of forget sometimes to pause and smell the roses, I've gotten a lot better at it recently, like the last few months, cuz I've actually been focusing focusing on being more present. And it had let me tell you, it's amazing. It does wonders for everything for your life experience. But so with my clients the most of the time, the reason they need to like, the reason I remind them is when they're in a place where they're either projecting into the future of like, what to happen, and they're like, anxious and all that, or they're like going back in the past and re examining the past and what they could have done or what they should have done, etc. That's usually when I remind them, like, you know, past already happened can't do much about it, it's already happened, all you can think about is like what you can do about what you're experiencing now. And again, like you're projecting into the future, and like you really like you get to decide what your future looks like. So it's like, is that the future you really want to choose. So it's like just reminding them that they, you know, they have that choice that they are empowered beings, because sometimes they forget. And so it's just like reminding them that like, the person that has all the power right now is the being in the present, like the beat the person they are right now. So it's like they get to choose, they get to create and go from there. But if my clients are in a like creative, like, bubble, and they're just like going and going and going and going, and that's the space that they're in and they want to create, I'm not going to stop there and be like, go ahead, do your thing. Remember to eat and drink water and sleep. So you don't crash and burn. Because we tend to do that sometimes, or we crash and burn. Remember to do that. But um, other than that, like, it's your process, so you get to enjoy however you want.

Alex Villacis:

I love it again, it's not you're not in a position. I'm saying like, I'm God, I know everything. It's more like, Hey, I am here for the ride to ride along with you. But you're driving.

Samoa Blanchet:

Yeah, exactly. But my perspective is actually your God, because it's your life. It's your like, You are the creator of all of it. So it's like I'm definitely definitely not when it comes to your life. I'm the creator of my life, my experience, and you're the creator of your experience. So will I give you advice? will I tell you what I see? Yes, of course. Um, if you're just if you're trying to decide between one thing or another and be like, well, it's your decision, do whatever you want. I will I'm assuming you're asking me because you want to hear my perspective. So I'll tell you my perspective. What I think would be helpful. I might even tell you like which path I think would be the best for you to go on. But ultimately, it's always your decision.

Alex Villacis:

Nice. Yeah. So it's like the healthy house sounds like a healthy non abusive relationship. Exactly. So my last I'm loving this, I love this question my respect for your time. My last question would be, where do you think like creative mentorship, creative coach and creative education is going to go in the future? Because again, we have so many coaches right now. And there is this question for people who want to enter either they are young and in high school thinking about becoming creatives, or they are like already adults, and they want to go into the creative field, and then they ask, Should I go back to school? Should I find a mentor? What should I do? Where do you think this will go? Do you think it will? It's going to change, do you think has already changed? Where do you think we are? And where do people go?

Samoa Blanchet:

We talked earlier about anger, the educational system angers me. And for that, and for that reason, I do want to actually be a pioneer to change the educational system, because it really, it's really not conducive, not only does it isn't not conducive to creative expansion, it actually robs people of their creative expansion. Um, when you look at the way that school systems, like, just from K through 12, schools are, like they're all about, they're all about you falling in line, following the rules, having one authority, usually the teacher in the classroom, like there's not an end, like if you try to if you like, I've even experienced this, where with math problems, if you try to, if you solve a math problem, you get the right answer, but you go about it a different way than the teacher may have taught you, um, you still get it wrong, or you still get point on things like that. So there's not much that like, there's not much space to like, promote innovation and creativity and all that. And then you also see that when you when you graduate, when you tell your parents or you tell people you want to go into a creative field, people tell you, Oh, no, you're gonna be broke. But there's a starving artist mentality. So there are a lot of beliefs in society, that stem from the educational system, that tells us that creativity isn't valuable. Um, and, yeah, that it's not valuable. And for that reason, I want I actually want to be like, in the near future, hopefully, I'm, I'm working on it, I want to create a a different system for education where people are, from a young age, people are being encouraged to, in the same way that I do for my clients, they're being encouraged to really pursue their, their their biggest, their highest creative drive, and really, like throw themselves behind it. So to answer your question around, whether people should go back to school or get a mentor, I think it really depends on what you're doing and where you're at and what you feel would be important. For example, sometimes you need to go to school to like learn specific skills. And sometimes you can learn and now with the internet, you can learn skills on YouTube, or like on skit on on other like website, like course websites and whatnot. So it really depends. For example, I'm a self taught digital artists, because I've always wanted to learn to paint in procreate, but I wasn't able to learn when I was a kid. And so I just bought an iPad, and I started and I bought a course and I started learning and I started practising, and now I'd say I'm pretty good. So you know, some things you need to go to school for some things you don't like, it's really like a personal decision. And then it's the same thing with like having a coach or mentor. We talked about how to choose the right mentor for you. So it's like, it's really just like be like, your creativity is sacred, it's extremely valuable, no matter what anyone is telling you like, is probably the most valuable. No, not probably, it is the most valuable thing that you'll ever have. Because it's yours, it's unique to you, nobody can take it from you, nobody can rub it, nobody can steal it unless you allow them to. And it is the thing that I leverage. And each client that I work with, it is the thing that I help them leverage to accelerate things and amplify the kinds of results in the lifestyle that they want. So if you let someone take it away from me, and you let someone rob it from you, then you you're robbing yourself of an amazing, like, unbelievably abundance life. So all I'm saying is be aware, be very, very, like intentional about who you let have access to that and have access to shaping your perspective of your creativity. Because if you have it in the wrong hands, it will literally it will set you back. No one can ever take it from you or steal it from you. But again, delays and delays and delays and you know, we're mortal, you know, so like, it's a lot of time wasted for no reason and I'm speaking from my own experience, like I could have been much further than I am now had I not had my creativity robbed for me from an early age. So, um, or how to like even have to protect it from an early age. So we've all experienced that, especially as creatives, the more creative you are and the more you you hold on to that creativity, the more ostracised It'll be by society. But keep going hold on to it and find the people that are going to fully unconditionally support that.

Alex Villacis:

What a beautiful way to end this episode. I mean, wow, thank you. This is so good. I have I have already like three people reminding me to listen to this interview. Like right now, like in my head. So now as we come to an end, is there anything you want to promote? Do you have maybe a course coming up? Or do you have a book or a movie that you think creatives would benefit from,

Samoa Blanchet:

I don't have a course, I have a book I've been reading. It's a psychological book, actually. So it was really crazy reading it because again, I came up with all these perspectives from just my work with people. But it was really cool to see like these psychological studies, like, confirm a lot of the things that I already knew. And it was like, wow, and they're just saying in a different, okay, so the name of the book is called the creative self, the effects of beliefs, self efficacy, mindset, and identity. And basically, it's a very scientific book. So if you if you get bored easily, you might not, it might not be an easy read. But, and honestly, it's something that you want to digest slowly. Because that's how I'm reading it. Like I'm, I'm taking notes and highlighting, I have like sticky notes in there. Because it really helps you see, just first of all, just how powerful your creative mind is. And like how it shapes. Everything here, like literally everything in your life, things that you don't even realise it's shaping, it's shaping. So it helps you see that. And it also helps you like, not just understand it, but like, see how you can start changing things, how you can start shaping your mind and the way that you actually want to shape it because it has been shaped already. It's been shaped by other people, by society by different structures and systems. So now you kind of you're able to take that power back and shape it in the way that you want to. But it's not a self help book. It's literally just a psychology book. And I love it for that. Because you get to choose, you get to decide how you like you get the information, and then you get to decide what you want to do with it.

Alex Villacis:

That's a great book recommendation. And I love it. It's not a self help book. Everybody should know that. It's not a self help book. Yeah, because because a lot of people don't want to read self help books. It's great. It's from a scientific perspective. psychological perspective is awesome. Yeah. Well, thank you so much for this interview. It has been really amazing.

Samoa Blanchet:

Yeah, thank you so much for having me. This was a really great conversation.

Alex Villacis:

Yay. That's music to my ears. That was such a long episode, folks. But it went by so fast. For me, at least like during the interview and editing it, it just went by so fast. Because I love so much energy. I have to be honest, I really love her energy, her effervescence, the way she talks, the things she talks about, and I hope you got something out of it and that you want to reach out to her, you'll find all her links or her stuff to her social media. It's on the show notes as well as the book she recommended, as well as a link to her own podcast creative mastery with Somaliland chat, which I have enjoyed very much. And if you like this episode, you would love that show too. So check it out and check out all the other amazing things that she has put out for us all to enjoy. And as we come to the end of the show, I want to thank you for joining me on another episode and give me your time. I hope you're enjoying this conversations and please subscribe to the show and give us a review or give us any feedback you can reach out to us on social media as well. All the links are in the show notes. To let us know if you have questions you would like to ask creatives. What would you like to learn? If you have somebody to recommend please let us know I am here to make something great for you. That said, again, thank you and hope to be again in your ears next week. Keep learning and stay curious. Bye