Do I need school to be...

a graphic designer? with Georgina Henry

December 09, 2021 Alex Villacís Season 1 Episode 19
Do I need school to be...
a graphic designer? with Georgina Henry
Show Notes Transcript

In this week’s episode I’m talking to Georgina Henry, a graphic design student from England and Luxemburg living in Rotterdam. Another face-to-face interview where we talk about being rejected by all the design schools she applied to and how an artistic residency in Berlin and the experience of sharing a studio with others helped her develop a portfolio to then get into her first choice schools.

On this very fun interview we spoke about:

  • Her experience at the Willem de Kooning Academy
  • Screen printing and the word ‘squeegee
  • Developing a portfolio during an artistic residency
  • Her mom as her greatest teacher and more! 

Want to learn more about Georgie? Here are some links:
 Website
Instagram
Berlin Art Institute Residency Program
quickanddirty.nu

Here are a few more recommendations of things we talked about during the show:
The Journalist and the Murderer by Janet Malcolm
The plantation of our ancestors podcast (In Dutch)

In an effort to make this podcast accessible, we make transcripts of every episode. You’ll find the transcripts on our website here, https://doineedschooltobe.buzzsprout.com

Want to support the pod?  Follow us on Instagram, Facebook and support the show on Buy me a Coffee

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Georgina Henry:

I think it was when I was a kid. I think it happened really without me knowing. And my mom, my mom always was like this way, like, she's a bit of a, she always comes up with new projects to make, I don't know, to make money or to have fun. And she was starting this gardening gardening project where she would like go over to people's gardens, and they'd pay her to, like, do the flowers and stuff. And she's like, God, do you want to do the graphic design for it? And I was like, Ted, but I was like, on paper. They're like drawing flowers, putting type in the little leaves, like gardening. They only pay like, really, really DIY stuff. And I didn't think much of it as like, oh, that's fine, you know. And then I did a few things like that. And then

Alex Villacis:

Hello, friend. And welcome back to another episode of joining. It's going to be the podcast in which we Alex is going to sit down with creatives and ask them about their journey into the creative field, focusing on their education, the teachers who shaped them, the boxer shaped in the movies, in general, what their journey was like, if you're somebody who is thinking about entering the creative field, I hope this show will be a resource to you, and show you that we all have different paths, and they are all valid. So let's go. On this week's episode, I'm talking to Georgina Henry, who I also know in real life, it's weird, like so many people in this podcast have only known through the internet. But this one I know she's flesh and blood. She's a real person. And she's a wonderful graphic designer from Luxembourg and England, who has a very unique perspective to life and everything. In this episode, we talk about how she didn't get into art school at her first tried to get a little bit and how a residency programme just changed her path completely. We're talking about her slight aversion to the internet. And many more things too. We talk about her mom, we talk about her inspirations, her visions. It's really a great episode, and I hope you love it. And here's my conversation with Georgina Henry. And we're recording Hi, Georgie. How are you today?

Georgina Henry:

I'm good. Thanks. And you?

Alex Villacis:

Also very good. Here we are, again, in the very small studio. Talking like news anchors for some reason why? I've said a couple times in the podcast that even though I don't know in which order they're going to come out to this might make no sense to somebody that because of quarantine, I've had a lot of interviews through a screen also because a lot of people are not in Rotterdam. So now I don't know what to do with my hands.

Georgina Henry:

Like sweet, isn't it? Yeah, the whole zoom thing. And now we here realise,

Alex Villacis:

behave around people. I went to dinner the other day to get a present for my sister. And there's people inside the store not wearing masks. And I thought this is nuts. Yeah, not safe. What's happening?

Georgina Henry:

I bought him to school. Just not I was like, do I do? Do I not?

Alex Villacis:

Do I clean my hands? I still do it. Yeah. Yeah, it's for funsies. So tell the audience who you are and what you're currently working on.

Georgina Henry:

Okay, well, my name is Georgina Henry, and I'm from Luxembourg. But I'm half British and half Luxembourgish. And I'm currently in third year graphic design at the Willem de Kooning Academy in Rotterdam. A. And I've just finished a five minutes internship at 75 B design studio in Rotterdam. They do a lot of cultural work. Clients like the film festival, Annabelle, Susan Bell, really, really fun work. And yeah, I just finished so I'll be going into my fourth year. And I'm really interested in designing Yeah, designing things that communicate something that have like a added value to them. That's what I really love doing. And yet, currently, yeah, and for my graduation project and thinking of combining graphic design with silk screening. Fine. Yeah. And that's kind of like the direction I'm going into, and then combining it with like, yeah, I'm really interested in going into the cultural sector as well. So seeing how that can link together in a way.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, sounds fun. Sounds like you have a very clear perspective already.

Georgina Henry:

Yeah, I just got that last week. I was having a conversation with my boss. And he's like, Yeah, we really miss like, experimental screen printing in the city. And I was like, I really love screen printing. And I can combine that with graphic design and boom, you know, which is

Alex Villacis:

your favourite thing about screen printing? And can you then describe it a little bit for the people who don't know what screen printing is?

Georgina Henry:

Oh, yeah. So screen printing is basically analogue printing technique, where you use a stencil to that you put on light sensitive emotion, and by lighting the emotion. It creates the design in the screen, so then you're able to use any ink Even like glow in the dark ink or silver ink to print on paper or textiles even. So, yeah, with the each screen has a different mesh counsellor, depending on what material going to print on, you would use a different screen also. But yeah, what I really love about it is like, the colours you can produce with it and like mixing colours and gradients in. Yeah, I think there's a lot of potential there also, because everything's going digital, and I'm kind of protesting to go digital. Also, just because I think you can achieve things that you can't with a normal printer. And it's also just really fun. To be honest.

Alex Villacis:

I think it's also very useful. And if I remember correctly, it was the printing technique. Students using Paris in the 80s to protest because they could produce at high volume. Yeah,

Georgina Henry:

that shoots very cheap as well. And it's very quick to use. As soon as you have the design, you can do it multiple times. That's really fun about it. And experiment

Alex Villacis:

with it. Yeah. How do you feel about the word squeegee? Yeah, you feel about that word greedy. It sounded like a joke to me. When me I learned from me. Yeah, like, we both know, Mia. She's like the silk screen in first year. Yeah, silk screen God, basically. And she told me he said squeegee, and I was like, what's the real name? Like, that cannot be real. And she's like, No squeegee.

Georgina Henry:

It's, it's, it's freaky. But you know, I kind of like it, it fits. Because there is this kind of squeeze that when you pull the ink, sometimes it gets called on the dry mesh. And it kind of goes. And I love that.

Alex Villacis:

You know, if there's anything that's going to be like its scientific name, it's going to be squeegee? I think that's the thing. I think I agree. And how did you get into the creative fields? Or how did you find out that you wanted to be in the creative field?

Georgina Henry:

Yeah, that's a good question. I think it was when I was a kid, I think it happened really without me knowing. And my mom, my mom always was like, this way. Like, she's a bit of a, she always comes up with new projects to make, I don't know, to make money or to have fun. And she was starting this gardening gardening project where she would like go over to people's gardens, and they'd pay her to, like, do the flowers and stuff. And she's like, 20, do you want to do the graphic design before and I was like, Ted, but I was like, on paper, you know, like drawing flowers putting type in the little leaves, like Ali pay, like really, really DIY stuff. And I didn't think much of it as like, oh, that's fine, you know. And then I did a few things like that. And then I got to high school. And I was like, Yeah, I can I can do this. I can do graphic design. And then I actually was when I was like, Oh, do I want to do graphic design. And then I actually went to do film first for a month in England. Fun fact.

Alex Villacis:

If you're going somewhere, I mean,

Georgina Henry:

yeah. So I did film for a month there. But I dropped out. And then as you do as you do, we add the thing is in Luxembourg in the in high school. You can specialise in your last four years, but it's all very, you still do a lot of all round subjects. It's never a very specific specialisation. So I came out of high school without a proper portfolio. So when I tried to do graphic design, I got rejected by all my schools. So I was kind of like, okay, that that kind of sucks. But then Yeah, after doing film, I went to Berlin and I worked on my portfolio in this like, it was like an artist residence night. And yeah, there was two artists that ran out a couple. And every week, they'd have a guest lecturer in and you would have to present your work in front of them. And you would talk about your work with other people that work there. And that was super, super cool. But yeah, that was really a self initiated and a lot of self learning, I guess.

Alex Villacis:

But that's great. Sounds like you had before your formal education. You had another type of education. Yes. Hit the mic. Thank God for editing. So you had these other more personal education and access to different resources? Yeah.

Georgina Henry:

Yeah. And I think, yeah, because before I kind of relied a lot on the education I was getting in high school. And then I was like, You know what I can I can do this on my own. I kind of had to, because I really wanted to come here as well. And then yeah, three months, whipped up a portfolio, tutorials, all that. And then yeah, I applied and I got all my first choices. So that was really cool.

Alex Villacis:

That sounds great in that case, so you have that experience of first not getting anywhere then investing the time and learning from different people and learning from yourself. Exactly. And then doing it again. So the influence that education can have. The thing is that in the podcast, we when I say education, it'll be like formal education because anybody can educate you. Anybody can be a teacher. Yeah, exactly. And it's those experiences that shape you In the end of who you are,

Georgina Henry:

yeah, I agree. Yeah. And I think it was all the people I was around as well what was really really fun there was that there was all kinds of ages. It was his, I think it was like six year old man painting and and you chair studios with other people and you're with fine artist, you're with product designers, and everyone was just taking what they could from each other. And that's that kind of learning was super fun. That was really cool.

Alex Villacis:

Sounds also very pure. Yeah, everybody was there just to work on themselves just work and learn from others. And this experience of were here just to create,

Georgina Henry:

yeah, exactly. It wasn't like, We're doing this for grade or I was doing it for a portfolio. But my, like, went in to it thinking, Okay, I went into and I was I had a bit of a creative block as you do, as you do. And then my mentor was like, Do you know what just make for your own fun, like, do something that you're interested in? I was like, okay, yeah. So Right. This is meant to be fun anyway. And then, yeah, it just just blossomed into

Alex Villacis:

it just, it just came out. And it just created.

Georgina Henry:

It was a lot of work.

Alex Villacis:

About your mentors. So what was your mentor? Like? What was that relationship? Like? Did you go into it thinking, I'm going to get a mentor out of this? Or was it more organic?

Georgina Henry:

I went into it thinking, okay, maybe he can give me some tips and tricks or portfolios and stuff, I never thought I'd have the relationship that I did with, with them, like because it was too. They were super, they were like friends, like, honestly, like, and they brought the nicest people in like really cool artists. And yeah, they made me feel really comfortable to talk about my work. Whereas before I would didn't, like was bit insecure about what I was making. In the end, I was like, I can do this. I can come to this admission in this school and feel confident about what I've done. And I remember just saying to them at the end, like thank you so much, guys like you. They were really like a support system. And they made I think the way they ran the whole place media Holyoke community. And like, it was a really like, diverse and everyone that came there, everyone was allowed to come and it was very affordable as well, which was really nice.

Alex Villacis:

That's awesome. Yeah, we definitely have to like give them a shout out eventually. Yeah, know about

Georgina Henry:

this, shout out Berlin Art Institute Shout out

Alex Villacis:

Shout out Berlin Art Institute. No, it's great. I'll definitely like reach out to them and ask them if they want to be a part of the podcast? Because it sounds like people who Oh, yeah, for sure. Yeah, that really would be really interesting to hear that sounds great. Thank you for that tip. Yeah. Have you had any other teachers that mark, do the voice that when you're creating something you hear that their voices in the back of your head can be positive or can be negative? Like both? Both everything has an influence on you?

Georgina Henry:

Yeah. With teachers can be everything writers can be

Alex Villacis:

everything can be. I, for example, had a chef on the podcast, and she is a regenerative farmer. And she has learned a lot from the earth about how the earth reacts to different things. So she has allowed the earth to be her teacher. So that's also a teacher to teach her can be anything. It's very broad in this podcast.

Georgina Henry:

Yeah. Obviously, like I feel, yeah, it's really, it might be bit corny, but my mom, she's like one of my biggest teachers. I hope she listens to this. But I think the way she she's a single mom, and she's really like, she does everything just to keep us like happy as we can be. And I think that's really brings me to emotionally even talking about it. But just like the drive that she has, I see it reflect on the way I approach things as well. And like one of my I don't know if I can do this, I think okay, mom did so much. I can do it as well.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, you get like your drive from your mom. That's so cool.

Georgina Henry:

Yeah, I think yeah, definitely. I think for me, it's definitely people also my roommates. Because I feel like, yeah, since we started school, we always talk about a lot of topics at home, like societal issues and everything. And I think constantly talking about them at the dinner table was super helpful. So for the way you design, and like the things you have to take into account when you're designing as well. And we've had a lot of conversations about recognising our privilege, and how do you implement that in a design process as well? See, I'm really thankful for having those kinds of people around as well, that made me constantly think, Okay, do I have the right to be researching this? What is my position in this research? And I also noticed, yeah, maybe sometimes why that didn't work at school, for example. Yeah, I just remember this project about low literates that I did in I think it was in second year. I think so. Yeah. And I just remember that the timeframe was really small and we We did some research into low literacy. But now when I reflect back on air I, I really feel like that was very superficial research, you know. And I in that whole time, I never was able to I was never in contact with someone with low literacy and I made a project out of it. It just felt now it feels wrong. At the time I didn't notice. But that's also a learning curve. I think, first realising that maybe, yeah, this fast paced, reshape research thing doesn't necessarily make your work. Very valuable in the end. But if you're if you're, if you don't have time to go in depth and do ethnographic research and everything,

Alex Villacis:

yeah, then just the thing, I know that and just say it then just be like, I'm a more visual visual research than actually a human research. I love that I listened to I went to a festival, the or second festival. I probably butchered that word. It's for podcasters. And there's this one woman. She has a podcast called The plantation of our forefathers, in which she goes into the store, like she looks to her family tree. And she found out that generations before her family in the Netherlands had slaves. And she found the no descendants of those people. And she sits down and has conversations with them about the slavery legacy that is still in the Netherlands today. Yeah. And she had the same question like, how do I fit into these research? How do I as a white woman in the Netherlands has all this privilege? How do I insert myself in this topic? And she mentioned maybe you like it, it's a book about it's called the journalists under murder, from Janice Malcolm in which she talks about is exactly that. How are you as a journalist, as a researcher, as a designer, keeping from just throwing throwing gasoline into the fire? Yeah, exactly. Work more interesting. Yeah. Yeah, they should check it out. I'll send you the link. It's really interesting. Yeah, that

Georgina Henry:

sounds really interesting, because it's actually one of the things that I'm really aware of now when I'm designing is we also had a situation at the internship where we got an assignment from an actress called Jacqueline Blum, and she's making this web like she's making this website and like support system for inequality in the film, in the film industry. And she came to the studio, and it's run by two white males. And they, they recognise that they're like, why are you coming to a studio? that's run by two white males when you're creating a gender and equality? Organisation? Yeah. And then she said, Yeah, I'm coming to you guys. Because I know you're good. And because I believe that we need Ali's, in this world. And I was like, Yeah. And I was like, actually, because I thought about it. I was like, Why is she coming into the studio like, and then she said that and I was like, that's actually really nice as well, that that's a discussion as well, that is also being talked about, but also that she said that I also agree that you need at least two

Alex Villacis:

young her problem but and to be in a position in which you are informed yourself to a level that you can say like, okay, maybe you don't know much about this. Yeah. I'm going to, like have conversation. Yeah, exactly. not alienate anybody. I love that. I love that. Yeah. And now see, now that you're in this position, and you talk about your roommates being like teachers to you, and also having those exchanges and having those conversations. Do you see yourself in a position in which you could teach somebody else something or that you could be a teacher or a mentor to somebody?

Georgina Henry:

I yeah, I don't, I don't at the moment, I don't see myself as a teacher. I mean, in a way, everyone is a bit of a teacher. Exactly. I think. Yeah, while having all these conversations, and then I feel like there's been a lot of difficult conversations in the last year, especially that those just by having them it's already teaching in a way or sharing knowledge that you've gained from somebody else. So it's kind of like, Yeah, you get something from someone you give it to someone else that might not be informed. I think that is teaching. But I Yeah, it's weird. I wouldn't call myself a teacher, you know, but maybe someone was like, oh, yeah, I did learn that from God. I just don't know.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, I think we put so much weight on this word. And yeah, like teacher you have to be the authority on something. But yeah, we're in the end. We're all the authority are on our own lives. Yeah. In if somebody were to ask you about your life and be like, Hey, how do you relate to this, how you feel about this? And you can also teach them about that. And as a graphic designer, do you think your work has the power to teach somebody something to have these educational aspect?

Georgina Henry:

Well, yeah, I mean, I remember in first year I was always like coming in to create assignment to just the world you know, that like, everyone's thinking it but it still it's not really like that. But I'd hope that by talking about my work, maybe people reflect on things that I that I raised in concept or something. I do. Yeah, I remember doing this project called confusing penis, really funny name, of course. But it was about identity and how you identify with your own body. And we made this cardboard. We made this board where you could add these body parts to redesign your body. And it created a lot of Yeah, interesting conversations. Some were really like fun and light hearted and some more a bit more. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

I know what you're doing. Well, you're creating education, you're creating spaces for educational moments.

Georgina Henry:

Well, that sounds nice.

Alex Villacis:

It was you're doing because I remember your greenwashing project. Yeah. It was more you're creating a space where conversations can happen. Yeah. And with this project, it sounds like if somebody came and said like somebody who had a body dysmorphia, that will give them a space to talk about that topic. Yeah, you're creating spaces, situations in which people can teach something.

Georgina Henry:

He really, really fit there. You really wow. Oh, my God, I guess that is always happening. I never thought of it like that. But yeah, it did create a space for conversation. And that's what I really love about designing with other people, especially and also creating projects that, yeah, like that.

Alex Villacis:

Hey, friend, it's Alex just interrupting this conversation to remind you that in order to have the optimal experience, and enjoy all the links in the show notes, you can subscribe to the show on any platform you're using to listen to this podcast. And yeah, it supports the show, he will improve the algorithm for you. So he will show you more shows like this one you will potentially like. And if you wish to support the show, you can follow us on social media, all the links are in the show notes as well as a link to buy me a coffee, which Yeah, will help pay for the hosting. And I also love coffee. Thank you for listening to the show and letting me be in your ears. And now I'll go back to my conversation with Georgie. Look, look at us figure

Georgina Henry:

out what to do that. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

And you said before in the beginning that you are like fighting or being a bit of a rebel when it comes to like the digitalization. How do you think that will affect that occasion? Because now, I don't know if you notice, but in 2020, every designer had a course. Everybody had a course there was people like saying like social media course, are all to try to make a vector or everybody that went into education. And because of the pandemic, we had these new methodology of having this virtual sessions and we didn't have the face to face contact. And you're somebody that likes to work with others. Yeah, this interaction. So how do you think this digital wave will affect us? And do you think we should fight it? We should embrace it. Where do you stand there?

Georgina Henry:

Well, yeah, I've had a lot of tips from friends. They were like to g cardfighters. imar. He wants to me I you know, you can't fight the digital world. I was like, well, shout out to IMR. But I was always get really frustrated with these like digital programmes, it was more of like, I'm not going to do and then I took a course knocked out. Of course I did. After Effects. Oh, that there were so many How To Be quick. You know, stressing out that I'm going to be left behind to the digital world. But now as also building a silk screening studio in my house, I still haven't finished it. But

Alex Villacis:

as I screen, it's a process.

Georgina Henry:

I don't think we need to run the digital world is really fascinating is what I really, like respect what people are able to do. I think it's just like, I feel bad, disconnected from the real world when I'm in front of a screen for so long. And that's what kind of freaks me out that I'm spending all that time on a computer and then kind of like missing out on life. Yeah, I'm not gonna find it. I'm still trying to get my digital skills, like in a place where I can do both. But I just enjoy it more like doing things that are tangible.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah. I think and I would love to hear your thoughts on this. As somebody who creates spaces for conversation. That's the thing I listen to. The thing about to me with social media and the internet is that it allows space for people to say things they would never say in person. Yeah. And that is a positive and that is a negative as well because on one side, very oppressed person or a person who has Has communication skills for a issues with for ABCD reason, can speak out on issues relevant to them. But also you have all the trolls that will insult people to their faces. I'm doing air quotes, without it. So do you think they're there? We can achieve a balance in which it's how we use it. Right? It's a tool. That is how we use it.

Georgina Henry:

Yeah. It's really hard. Yeah, I do. In a way. I do love social media for spreading all that information, especially because I feel and now it's Instagram, isn't it with all those like threads. But it also got super informative. And I think it's also really great, especially in countries where you can't when news outlets can't be trusted. But it is it does blow up really quick. And I feel like yeah, cancelled culture and all that like the way as soon as someone sees something, they might not question the source, even if it's not accurate. But I do. I love how much I can find out on on social media, and how much I can learn there as well. And I also really enjoy discovering new artists and designers on social media. And I think it's a super cool way that we can even do that. That's true, and to this new work. And I really love that part of it.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, and the chance you have to learn from different people. I mean, you could find a mentor in South Africa. Or you can find if there's a technique you really like you can find a mentor in India, or Mexico or in Australia or wherever.

Georgina Henry:

Yeah, it creates this whole connection between everyone. I think it's just important to know, it is really extremely powerful. And I think there has to be a balance. Yeah, obviously, I think it's definitely a pro, a lot of pros and a lot of cons involved.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah. And I think another important aspect is how the cost that it comes. So to give you an example, that we're hitting a bit in the clinic Academy, and it's a school in the Netherlands, and as a European citizen, you get a different tuition fee that somebody will get who's not a European citizen. Yeah. And that is an aspect of financial aspect is there. And the beauty of people getting access to courses is that you can take a course on Illustrator, for example, and learn from I don't know, $50, what would maybe cost you 2000, or something to learn in formal education. So that opens those avenues as well as, as a person that has a deaf person of privilege. We're both person people.

Georgina Henry:

Yeah, of course. Yeah, definitely. And I think, yeah, that's why I also really love those tutorials. And because people can learn by themselves, I think we have being able to come here is a really big privilege. And you learn things on top of skills, of course, and conversations that wouldn't happen if you're learning by yourself. But I really love that design can come from, yeah, not maybe you don't necessarily have to come to the school to be able to design, but it's definitely a big plus. Yeah, you're able to.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, it means I love that. And that's the point of these podcasts, that there are different ways to learn and different avenues to learn, and to talk about those issues. So if somebody listens to this, they're like, I cannot afford design school. Yeah, you can actually learn other ways you can find a very affordable mentors.

Georgina Henry:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah, that was a lot of self study as well. And I think it's also I feel like so much in the design world, it's also about getting to know people. And yeah, cuz I went to this studio the other week, and they say they don't recruit people on diplomas. They look at how a person is in real life, and how if they fit in a team, and that's a big one as well fitting into the design team. And I feel like if you can put yourself out there and talk to people, that also depends on how you are as a person, then you can probably have a design career. Yeah, through self taught.

Alex Villacis:

And I think another benefit of at least the school is when we do that practices, and it makes us up with people from other disciplines. So you can think like, I think there are ones that correlate very well like animation and graphic design, clear path. But then if you get animation, and I don't know, lifestyle transformation design in your life, what do you guys actually do? What is it that you people actually do? Because nobody can explain it?

Georgina Henry:

Nobody really knows. Nobody know. Yeah, I love that as well that they mix us up like that super. Like, I would just remember learning a bunch of new techniques with these people. And that's super nice and very non traditional. I think from like, when I look at art schools in the UK, I feel like that's very different, how they approach it here, and I really like that.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, I would love to see an initiative maybe in this university and other universe or other educational avenues in which we don't only work with people from different disciplines, but from completely different areas. Like what? Imagine that you had a project they say like, Hey, George, we're gonna pair you with a mathematician. Oh, go, go.

Georgina Henry:

Okay, let's go. Pick me up.

Alex Villacis:

It's a yes. So any mathematicians listening to this? Well, George is open for collaborations yet, Cindy, I'm sliding to her DMs. So we have made it to the ends. I mean, I really bond conversation. I'm sure a lot of people will enjoy it. I hope please go away. But really, I'm making this for fun. Is there anything you want to promote your own work? Or it can be if there's nothing can also happen? It's 2021. Could be a book or movie and other artists could be anything?

Georgina Henry:

Yeah, I mean, what I'm working on at the moment is a website called quick and dirty dot new. Sounds really frisky. But it's just, I started it after a few weeks ago. It's brand new. And it's kind of like, just doing work that is not perfect yet. So things that I just sketch and I throw them online, because I wanted to, I feel like we I was always like, prone to make something that was really finished. And perfect. And I don't think that's always there's so much time in things that are unfinished or like, yeah. Then through impulse, so that's the website that I use for like sketches and stuff and, and doodles. Sounds really fun. Yeah. And yeah, my other websites just Gina henry.com. So check it out.

Alex Villacis:

Nice. And also links to your social media. Do you have to also put that Yeah, sure. Perfect. Great. Thank you so much. This was fun. So

Unknown:

fun. Yeah. Really enjoyed being on the podcast. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

And just like that, we have made it to the end of another episode. Thank you, Georgie so much for joining me today. It was such a fun time. Like genuinely from the bottom of my heart. He was so fun. And I really miss him interaction. Oh my god, I really miss it. But going back, you'll find links to Giorgis website, her work and her her project Megan dirty dots new in the show notes as well as a couple links to the Berlin Art Institute. When she did her residency and the podcasts and the book that I mentioned during the show. Everything will be in the show notes. And as we come to the end of the show, I want to thank you for joining me on another episode and give me your time. I hope you're enjoying this conversations and please subscribe to the show and give us a review or give us any feedback you can reach out to us on social media as well. All the links are in the show notes. To let us know if you have questions you would like to ask creatives. What would you like to learn? If you have somebody to recommend please let us know I am here to make something great for you. That said again, thank you and hope to be again in your ears next week. Keep learning and stay curious. Bye