Do I need school to be...

a UX Designer? with Rabeea Wajeeha

October 07, 2021 Alex Villacís Season 1 Episode 11
Do I need school to be...
a UX Designer? with Rabeea Wajeeha
Show Notes Transcript

This week on the pod we have Rabeea Wajeeha who is a UX Designer, Educator and community leader working towards improving people’s lives by giving them knowledge and helping them find jobs in the industry.

In this episode we talk about:

  • What is UX Design
  • Her initiative Teccelerator
  • Her many inspiring teachers
  • When the internet had a dial up tone

And much more!

She is extremely active online and always excited to meet new people and engage in conversations, here are some ways you can find her and some of her offers:
Teccelerator Academy
Rabeea’s Instagram
Rabeea’s LinkedIn
Design Talks Community on Clubhouse
Design Talks Community on Slack
Her e-book “Perfect Portfolio”

In an effort to make this podcast accessible, we make transcripts of every episode. You’ll find the transcripts on our website here, https://doineedschooltobe.buzzsprout.com

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Rabeea Wajeeha:

She was the type of person that saw potential in me. And before that, I was kind of not really thinking of myself in that way. But she was just so encouraging. And I think you always need someone like that, that sees something in you that you maybe necessarily don't see it at that point in time. But she always told me that I was made for good things in life, and I'm going to do amazing. And I just don't remember that because that was back in university. So like years have passed, and I still remember her kindness and how sweet she was. And she was always encouraging me,

Alex Villacis:

have a friend and welcome back to another instalment of join me at school to be a podcast about creative education, where meet Alex is going to interview people in the creative field and ask them about their education because we're all different. And we all learn different ways. And yeah, I want to learn I want to know who the WHO THE what the when the where of things you need to know to be in the creative field, or be creative inside your own field. On today's episode, I am going to be talking to Rebecca who is a UX designer and educator on entrepreneur, she's all the things and more. And yet, to be honest, for a while, I really thought that UX was 100% Digital, but it's not. Yeah, I was some days old when I realised that you X was not only digital, and what he was really about. And in this episode, we get to the core, like she explains it in her own words about what UX design is how she got into the field. And now her newest venture, which is accelerator, which actually teaches people how to use UX principles and how to get into the field, which will help them improve their lives. It's pretty cool, right? Okay, let's go to my conversation with rivia. And we're recording hyperopia. How are you today?

Rabeea Wajeeha:

I'm fantastic. How are you?

Alex Villacis:

I'm very good. It's been a busy but productive Tuesday. So happy about that. How is everything all the way in the other continent with these trends, continental conversation?

Rabeea Wajeeha:

I love these. This is the power of internet that you can really have conversations with so many different, like people from so many different parts of the world. So yeah, Canada is good, we are having really nice weather these days in Toronto is nice and summery. And just like perfect t shirt weather, as I like to call it where it's not too hot, not too cold. So that's like just the best thing. Because we get like winter, nine months out of the year, we're starved for sunshine, and just feel so good.

Alex Villacis:

Well, thank you so much for joining me today on the podcast is a great, so we met on clubhouse, and I really love the content you're putting out I've taken webinars with you and joined your life. So it's, it's great. And I am really happy that you're here that you're gonna bring that energy to the podcast. So start telling the audience, please, who you are and what you're currently working on.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Yeah, so my name is rubia. My background is in product design. I am also a agency owner, so we help other businesses with their digital experiences. And I am also a owner for accelerator Academy, where we host workshops to basically teach people so if you are not ready to get the work done to us, we're here to educate you on how you can get your presence online and build your network really doing all of that.

Alex Villacis:

Sounds great. And how did you get into this? We have had conversations before about your background and how you went into UX design. And we have talked about boot camps and all kinds of education when it comes to a creative profession. So how did you get here? What was your path

Rabeea Wajeeha:

like? So my path and it still is very much meandering. It's not something that has been static in any way, shape, or form. So going back to high school days, I was thinking that I would be like it but I was trying to decide on what to do for university. It was really business was the most logical thing to do on that's what my dad said, He's like, Okay, you know what, this is the safe way like, you'll always have business opportunities, quote, unquote. And he was right. Like there's always businesses around, you always have that as a very strong business background. And I think that has really helped me throughout my career. After graduating university, I started working in the corporate sector, which was very fantastic. I really did enjoy it. I think it really does give you that experience of polishing your communication skills, working as part of teams really taking leadership. There's so many things that come with part of just being in that environment that's very structured, but I was always itching for something more and I was wanting something different. I wasn't the type of person that could be put in a box or someone who was okay, we just kind of doing the same things over and over again, and I'm not trying to knock anyone down or in any way. Like I know this is not something that works for everyone. But I've just always been a very restless soul. So I'm always curious, I'm always looking to learn. So for me, it just didn't feel like it was Very good fit for my personality. And for others, it totally can be. So I don't want this to be something that okay, it's right for everyone to kind of just go out and do their own thing, because I totally see the value in the corporate world and making all of that work, it can be totally for you, if you're the type of person that is a good personality match for that. But for me, it wasn't really a good match. So I was like, Okay, let's see. So after corporate world, I worked in the humanitarian sector for a little bit. I moved abroad to Pakistan for about two years, which was really exciting, I got to re connect with my family. You know, it was something that, like, my grandma was actually really allowed that time. So we wanted to kind of be there for her. And there was just personal reasons for moving back home for a little while. But it also actually turned into a really fantastic opportunity I got to work with, I'm on projects with the United Nations and USAID and really got to work in the humanitarian sector, kind of go out of my own Bumble of living in Canada, and growing up in my, in Toronto, it just opened up my eyes, so many different things that were happening around the world, when you're working on a project. On such large scales, it really does open up your eyes to so many different things that are happening around the world. So it was really good, I worked there for about two years, to actually worked on two different projects, and great opportunities, I really enjoyed working with the team that was there. And just the opportunity to be able to kind of use all this technology. So that was kind of my first, I guess you can say, moving into the technology side of things. Because that project was very data driven. So essentially, what we were doing was so there were two projects, both of them were similar in nature. But what ended up happening was that till they were data driven in the sense that we were basically collecting information from all of our partners on the ground on different charities that we work with different organisations, putting it all together, and visualising that data for decision making purposes, and then actually going there and presenting it to very senior management and government officials and speaking to different parties that are involved in that process. And just sharing our findings. So that was really exciting. And I kind of got to be at the centre of that I got to meet like really cool people that were in these exciting roles. And I was like, Okay, this is really interesting. But what opened up my eyes was the fact that I realised how powerful technology is, you can really use it in so many different ways to connect with people, you can do some good with that. And just like with any other tool, you do have the positives and the negatives, sometimes it works. Sometimes it just lets you down. But overall, it was a good experience. So after that experience, I came back to Canada. After about two years, I was trying to figure out like what the next steps are. So with that, I was like, okay, you know, when I started my own business, and Shopify was really coming out at that time as a platform, I wanted to check it out. I went through this whole self taught route for a little bit. So for anyone who's going through that, I can totally relate to the self taught journey as well. Because I did that for a couple of years. And it was really interesting, I learned how to use like Shopify, all of the Adobe Suite, Illustrator, Photoshop, all of that fun stuff. Like I kind of googled my way through learning how to put together an online store, marketing it bringing on partners, so it was really cool experience. But then I got to a certain point where I felt like I needed to learn more about how to make these experiences better, and how to take your business to the next level. And me being the curious soul, then I decided to go back to school and take a bootcamp, which was a three month boot camp, it was for design for UX UI design. And that's where I kind of, I would say, officially transitioned into UX UI design, because this was something that I was trying to figure out from my own business, and I wanted to make sure that I was doing a good job there. And I wanted to learn it. So once I learned it, all these opportunities started to come my way, which I was not expecting, which is really super exciting. A lot of people that are in my network, like family and friends reached out helping them with their websites trying to help them with their online needs. And that was really exciting. And after a little while, I started to formalise it. I took some freelance projects, I worked for some corporate clients. And then after that, it was really just starting my own agency because it was starting to bring in enough business that now I had to hire more people and get the support that I needed. So that has been my journey from New zero tech to agency owner. And now I'm at a point where recently I have launched textile reader Academy where we're teaching teaching others how to go through this whole journey. So that has been my story so far.

Alex Villacis:

Wow, what a tale. I, I need a second. What a tale. It's I think it's the epitome of being curious about the world. And just following your curiosity, and I love that. And for those in the audience who are not sure what UX and UI design is, could you explain it real quick? Like in 30 seconds?

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Yeah, for sure. So I like to think of user experience design and user interface design. So that's what UX and UI stand for. The easiest way of kind of imagining it is, if you were to if you were to imagine a house, right. So anything that is structural in the house is your UX. So anything like your walls, anything that is like foundations, all of the structure of the house, that is the UX part of it. So that's what we think about from the user experience is like, how is someone going up the stairs? Or how are they going from one room to the next, all of those hallways, and the paths that are leading you from one thing to the next, are really your user experience? And what is your user interface interface is how you like interact with the, the outside of the walls would be like, what are the paintings that you have on the wall, or what is the aesthetics are the things that make it look beautiful. So I'm sure you would have noticed the difference between something that's very well designed by an architect, it's a beautiful living space, and someone has put a lot of thought into where every little element goes, of like, where the sofa is go, where the windows are, where the lighting is, all of those things are very strategically put in place. And that's what makes that whole experience of being in that room. So amazing, right? is the same for digital experiences. So every little thing, not just structurally has to be thought through, but also from like aesthetically, because if something just doesn't look nice from the outside, nobody's going to spend the time to go through it. And actually, you know, experience the rest of it, because it just doesn't look nice. And there is a beauty pious, unfortunately, people want to look at beautiful things, and people want to experience beautiful things. So we try our best to make those experiences as delightful as possible. So I hope that answers your question.

Alex Villacis:

That's perfect. And to add to that, I would just like to say that, because it's something that I learned recently, I thought that UX was completely digital. But you can also design UX, you had sent user experiences in a non digital medium, for sure. And I was like, Oh, really, I can. It's like, for example, how somebody experiences a restaurant. Like when you walk in, you can see very beautiful things, but do you know where to go? I love to explain it with the icons in the bathroom. If nobody understands them, that's terrible user experience because nobody knows what they are. Yes. It's like, Am I a meatball? Am I a noodle? What do they mean? It can be both? I don't know.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Yes, um, no 100% there's just so much more to that whole space. And really, this is something that impacts not just the digital spaces like there's also other parts of user experience design so service design for example, it's kind of what you're referring to, there is customer experience part of that as well. So if you like to think of like apple, for example, they have their digital world and then they have their physical stores and the whole unboxing of the Apple products experience. Like you want to think about every step of the way, right like we as user experience designers kind of focus just only on the digital world. But definitely there's more parts to this whole user journey or experience because like i Apple has done a good job of really thinking through every element of how it all ties together the whole brand. So you know how they have a lot of whitespace and they use it very strategically on their online stores like online presence and they do the same with their physical locations as well you will get a lot of glass A lot of things are very clear they have good lighting, so that sort of experience is also replicated in their physical stores. And same with that like unboxing experience you have that box that like really crisp and like just everything is perfectly pleased and you want to stick stickers off and you're like oh this is a little

Alex Villacis:

it's a little bit too tight so you pull it out carefully and that no matter what you do you cannot open up Apple product quickly it has to open slots like that build up of expectations experience

Rabeea Wajeeha:

exactly I keep saying that regardless how you feel about Apple that experience it's very unique and that has we have to give them credit for that. Yeah, no Apple has done a lot of things well I think over time, and if you read like Steve Jobs um like book and his biography and stuff like that, he was As a type of person, he's like, he really wanted to think through everything. And I think one that is coming to my mind is about being a carpenter, right. So he was the type of person if he was, his dad was a carpenter. But he would actually do the box of, you know, whatever he was building. So if he's building a cabinet, for example, he will do the parts, like he will paint the parts, or he will varnish the parts, or whatever it is that no one is ever going to see. So he's like, it doesn't matter. if nobody's ever seeing that little bit, you want to think about the whole thing, and you want to give it a lot of love in a way, and you want to make sure that it is something that is really well thought through. So that level of like putting your heart and soul into it, it kind of does show in the products that are Apple products, because they're very well thought out. Nothing is there like just by mistake or just for the sake of being there, everything is very intentional. And I think that's part of the reasons reason for why these products do so well. And same with their services. I think a lot of it is very well thought through.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, and that we're back from our leader detour. Um, so I would love to hear through these journey through these, it has been a very interesting journey very diverse, that touching a lot of aspects. Have you had any teachers that left a mark in you that when you're doing something you hear there was in the back of your head? Uh,

Rabeea Wajeeha:

yes, quite a few. I've always been a big believer of connecting with people who were ahead of me, or people who are doing well in life. So I can just kind of replicate that. I've always found it very fascinating that you can kind of there's no need to reinvent the wheel success always leaves clues. And when you have mentors in your life, you have people like that, that you kind of look up to be it someone who's like physically, like close to you, like a teacher, or someone who is like, you can read biographies, and you can read about people or listen to podcasts. There's just so many different ways where you can get that knowledge. Yeah, I have quite a few I would like to mention what are my university teachers, she is

Alex Villacis:

shout out.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

So Julia Richard, Dr. Julia Richardson, she was absolutely amazing. And, you know, just that she was the type of person that saw potential in me. And before that, I was kind of not really thinking of myself in that way. But she was just so encouraging. And I think you always need someone like that, that sees something in you that you maybe necessarily don't see it at that point in time. But she always told me that I was made for good things in life, and I'm going to do amazing, and I just don't remember that because that was back in university. So like, years have passed, and I still remember her kindness and how sweet she was. And she was always encouraging me. And I like she was I would say, one of my most favourite people on the face of the planet, because she's still amazing. Um, so she was one I've had quite a few Actually, I want to also say, like, Mr. Clark was my great a teacher, he was the first person I would say, Actually, he was, you know what, he just encouraged me so much, because I had moved from Pakistan to Canada when I was first in grade seven, and grade eight, like I was kind of in that transition period. So I came like at the end of week seven and moved to grade eight. But he was always so encouraging, like, he never made me feel like Oh, I didn't know how to do anything, or I didn't know how to make, it just makes such a huge difference on child psychology, when you make them feel like they can do anything they want, right? So I think that sort of encouragement I've really been fortunate enough to have in my life, I think that's part of the reason for why I feel like I can take the biggest jumps and I'll be okay. Because I've had people in my life that have shown me that I can do it and I don't want to forget my dad here. Because he would be the first person who is always always always been my mentor and my teacher in every single way because he has had the most amount of patients for me in his life. I've just like, there's just no amount of gratitude that you can have for someone who just encourages you to do what you whatever you put your mind to, and is there for you no matter what, like they'll catch you for all sorts of situations. So that's the type of life I've really been blessed. I know this is not something that's very common to have people like that that are so loving, so caring, and your life but when it comes to teachers and mentors, I think those are a few that popped into your head right away.

Alex Villacis:

That's amazing. I love it. I can feel like people listening to this be like Oh, yeah. I totally agree like having those precedents in your life that you know, like, okay, the second that you doubt yourself, you're like, no, but this person believes in me and a certain level of admiration for them. Yeah. Like if this person believes in me, then I must have something Yeah, there must be something in me if this person I respect. Yeah, believes in me. It's and. And it's not about that. It's about the quality. It's not about the numbers on like in social media, which is about the amount of likes that you get This case about who is this person? What connection do we have? That's beautiful. I love that.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

things. Yeah, no, I think for me, that has been really the biggest thing. And then you want to prove them, right? Like you, I can't tolerate not making them, right. Like, that's part of the motivation for why I do a lot of the things I that I do is because I know they have, you know, this understanding of me or like, of my potential or the things that I can do in my life. So I work really hard to make sure that I am actually reaching that potential and making them proud and doing whatever is in my power to make sure that I'm I'm living up to the potential then people see him.

Alex Villacis:

Of course, of course, that's great living up to the potential Yes. And and now you have gone into this journey of starting accelerator Academy. How did you decide that you wanted to do that? Were you always thinking about taking the educational route or Western business decision? How do you? How did that start for you?

Rabeea Wajeeha:

So tech salaried are kind of came out organically. So I've always been someone who is a big believer in education, I really do believe in empowering others. And that doesn't just come from me, um, but it comes from my family as well, going back to my dad and my grandpa, like, they've always been very encouraging of education, something that really can pull you out of any situation is if you have your brain really, and if you know how to use that, right? So there are a lot of people who would be like, you know, why do you always keep going back to school and spending so much money and like, you could have bought this and you could have bought it like these things. And you could have done this and would have been a much better investment. But I really am a strong believer in investing in myself. And I, that's part of the reason for why I think textile Raider Academy so near and dear to my heart is because I want people to have those tools to be able to, you know, make their lives better. If it helps you change your life's trajectory in a positive way, where say you move into a different career. So say you move into UX UI design, and now you're making a lot more money than you were before. And it's changed your life, not only your life, but also the life of your family, I'd be very happy. Like it's the impact. And I want to especially encourage this for girls and for women, because Tech has this like, really scary sort of, you know, just thinking where people feel like it's very male dominated, and girls can't really survive in this space. And that's not true, like, this space has been like this for forever, it still is very male dominated, yes, is true. But I would say don't be hesitant. Like there's so many opportunities, especially in the digital world for women to go out and do their own thing. So that's part of the reason for why I do love this project and something that I'm very passionate about. Because I want to give people the tools to be able to change their lives, if you have an idea, if you have a business, you want to start, I want to give you the tools to be able to do that. And that, to me, I think is really powerful to have that impact not just on yourself and your own life, but also on the life of others. Once you've learned that skill, you can also teach that to others, you can also have that impact on others. So to me, that's really powerful.

Alex Villacis:

It is I think it's so powerful how you're putting education not only as certification, or as something that if you want to have a career in this, thinking that it's also a tool to give your family a better future. Yeah. And especially for people of colour has encase that maybe they felt like these avenues were close to them. And just spreading the message that they are open like there are places that you can learn all these skills. Yes. And I have to say that I love also the courses that you have available. I you had one event about accessible design guide. I mean everywhere. And I thought that was great, because there isn't enough of that. Yeah, that's that's the second course that there's one that I know of. That is I think a weeks. It's a week. It's like it's a week of content. But and then you're done that that said in X, there's this huge hole in the accessibility in in bringing accessibility into design spaces.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Yeah. And it's sad to see I was speaking to Catarina and that kind of grew up very organically. I think clubhouse kind of played a role in that as well. Because every time we would have a room around accessibility around diversity and inclusion, there was just so much engagement. So it just showed us how people were like dying to talk about these topics. There just wasn't enough information on there. And then we had our first, you know, accessibility and UX UI design workshop at the end of last month, which was on the 29th of June. And we received amazing response to that we had corporate clients, I came out to actually attend the events which was really exciting to see. You know, there are companies that are looking to get all of their staff trained so I was like yay, this is so exciting. Um, And there were individuals who wanted to kind of participate in this as well. So I think there's definitely more need for education around accessible design. And I'm looking to partner up with more people as well bring in your experiences. This to me, textile Raider Academy is not just about me doing my thing is really to bring in all the talent from people who have experience who have knowledge in different spaces, and how can we leverage that and teach others and give them the tools to be able to make their lives better.

Alex Villacis:

That's beautiful. And when you start the accelerator,

Rabeea Wajeeha:

tech salary Academy is like a three month old project. And I've been kind of I've been planning it for a while. So it it has been planning for, like, since the beginning of the year, but officially launch wise, it's very, very recent. And a lot of it just came very organically because people were asking for these things, right? I get messages like the more I've been active on social media, I get messages on LinkedIn, Instagram clubhouse, like, these conversations have really been the catalyst for like, this is something that people are looking for. The other one that I'm planning out in the near future is going to be coming out in the mid in the beginning, the first week of August is going to be around how to start your agency, which is the going through the journey of like if you're a freelancer, or if he was working on your own? How do you scale that to be more of a business that can help you kind of, you know, have that? How do you build the team? How do you put those slps and standard operating procedures, and I'm partnering up with RA, she's amazing. She's an agency owner as well, we would come together, we're going to be talking about how to kind of build that foundation that you need to be able to kind of take your business to the next level. And same thing, a lot of this is coming very organically from what people are asking for. How do you get leads for your business? This is another one that I'm trying to work on is a this is a problem that pretty much every designer has pretty much every like every business has, how do you get more customers? How do you do that? So we're going to be sharing a lot of what we've learned along the way and policies, workshops to kind of help you guys in taking your business to the next level.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, and I have to say, like you to meet, in my perspective, at least for what I consider a good teacher, you're an excellent teacher, I love the amount of opportunities you get in in a space in a webinar. For feedback for questions. It's not just let me give you an I've talked about these people before, it's so annoying when you go to a webinar, and they give you a 10 minute introduction into the problem and into who they are and why they are the best people to solve it. 10 minutes of content and then 30 minutes of selling you something else. I personally hate that it feels predatory to me, but in in your case are constantly asking, okay, let's get engaged. Do you guys have questions you everybody understands is how do we approach this, and everything is very digestible. Yeah. And that just shows that you have a mastery of the topic and the speakers that you bring it also people who want to be there, they're not looking to just make a quick buck. It's want to spread spread information, which I love. I personally really appreciate that.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Awesome. I'm so glad you enjoyed it. Thank you so much for the positive feedback. That's amazing. Good to hear.

Alex Villacis:

And with all these avenues, and with tech seller, Academy and your work, where do you see creative education going? Because we are far away from the days of I want to learn how to sculpt I'm going to go chase Michelangelo around and hope that he takes me on. And what do you see going? Do you think there's more interaction? Or that we need that face to face? Or especially in digital? Maybe not? But still that human connection? Do you think he can ever be replaced by something like an AI?

Rabeea Wajeeha:

I don't think it will completely be replaced, I do see that the face of education is changing. I've always been a big proponent of like education and going to university I've literally been to every university in like the GTA and surrounding areas for some sort of a programme workshop. Like literally every school knows who I am. So I've always been a big fan of that. And but I do also start I have noticed that there is a big gap between the traditional education system and where are the type of skills that the world needs today, especially when it comes to digital skills, and creative careers. and creative businesses are indeed more in demand today than they were ever before. And it is going to continue to grow and I think the pandemic as biohazard eyes it's been for so many different things like I know so many lives have been impacted in so many different ways negatively. But one thing that has come out of that is the demand for digital skills and digital careers. Just because we were forced to kind of Move online and pretty much every business regardless of if you were a barber shop or salon owner, or whatever it is that you were a, you have had to find out a way for you to be able to survive. And a lot of that transition had to be done digitally because we couldn't physically get into stores. And that has completely kind of shifted in a very short amount of time. So a year, a year and a half. Now, the way like the demand for digital careers has exploded really. And it's so exciting to kind of see how this is going to be the new face of education and so many different ways like is great to have, like, I don't think you can replace becoming a doctor by just practising online, there's still room for that traditional, you know, education, there are still careers that you will probably still have to go to school for. And it's totally cool. But when it comes to this space, the digital space specifically, I think the traditional education system is really falling behind on that. And that's part of the reason for why I'm doing like this whole work on my end or whatever that I can do is to be able to educate people, like there's just so much happening in the space and the demand is so high right now that more and more people need to be able to get trained on this. And if you look at the numbers, I don't know if you've done any research around this, I have because I was trying to figure out this whole space, but in the UK, there's like two out of three people don't have digital skills to be able to keep their job in the near future like by 2030. So it's huge numbers. That's a lot of people that need to be digitally trained. A lot of people are still living in the last century. But the change has come so quickly in the last 20 to 25 years I would say now since I guess we were kind of growing up. Just imagine I don't know if you like our halls you're ever like for me. I'm going from like we used to have MSI. And like I still remember when I was in elementary school, we had MSN and the dialogue was yes buzzing

Alex Villacis:

people buzzing was so annoying. And we had but it was it was everything it was when a buzzer somebody's gonna know the life out of it.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

So like going from that where there was like barely any technology available to now where you're living in a digital world, everything around you so digital, but pace of change has been so dramatic. I don't think something like this has ever happened before. And if you think of like our parents generation, like they didn't used to have radios, like radios came in their lifetime, TVs came in their lifetimes, then the internet came in their lifetime. And now we are living in this crazy world. And I'm like, I can't like wrap my head around how your brain is still functioning because so much change has happened in the last like 60 years or so. And I think a lot of that has been really in the last 30 years if you really want to think about it. So it's absolutely insane Dude,

Alex Villacis:

you know, really funny like to give context to the younger listeners. I asked my parents the other day, what's the deal with mixtapes? Like, why are mixed because to me feels like making a playlist it's very easy just like you just click through them and say like, you just click through them. Yeah. And the mom was explaining to me how when she wanted to make a mixtape for my dad, he's like you're driving around you take a blanket cassette, you put it in the cassette recorder, you hear the sound that you like, and you're like, yeah, this record and then pray to God that the anchor the radio anchor is not going to say a message or say like, heavier EXA or something like that, that ruins the song and then they do you have to be like a honk at them and have to return to tape to the exact point to exit in the amount of effort and

Rabeea Wajeeha:

struggle was real. Romance way, way harder way back. Now you just forward the song to the first.

Alex Villacis:

That's just to give context. We've I love telling my little cousins in Ecuador when I go or my nieces and nephews and I tell them Did you know that once upon a time, we didn't have cell phones they're like what? Yeah, and the internet wasn't in the air you have to actually be connected to a computer and I play them the sound from the internet from the 90s they're like what's happening? Is the broken

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Yes. Um, no, that's funny. I just like even within our lifetimes so much has changed so the dial up tone was like, what my elementary school kind of reminds me of because that's what we would do we would run home from you know our class and this is why wouldn't be like just get on the messenger and like message your friends. Um, so yeah, Dad ties.

Alex Villacis:

And then someone calls and internet connection, Paul. Yeah. What a time to be alive.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Oh my god. We've seen so much change in our lives, but it's really interesting, but yeah, the newer generation does not understand the struggle. any of that.

Alex Villacis:

No, but it then it gets worse. It's like, my dad was talking to me about how like, I remember just if I had homework, I would just like, I could still go on Google and just google what I had when I needed. My dad was like, No, you had to go to get an encyclopaedia, and actually go to the library, like, every Are you had to go buy these like sheets that you bought at the store? And you're like, Oh, I need the sheet. 37 made by this person. He was just like a spreadsheet of things. I'm like, what's happening? Yeah, how did you that took effort that took like courage I get when people didn't want to do homework back

Rabeea Wajeeha:

then I respect that so much. I respect the people who went to school, like the generation before us. For us, it was kind of a mix, it wasn't like completely that level of struggle. I think I kind of grew on the edge of when I started to get easy. Like we did have internet, I did have a high school, like a laptop in my high school. So we were kind of on the edge of that world. But I think the previous generation, just I don't know how they did anything. But here we are.

Alex Villacis:

I'm curious about how it's gonna go in the next one. Because I see my less than one year old nephews who have a phone in their face from the second they were born to or taking pictures from the second they were born. And because of them, they were not taking them. They're not prodigies, but, or my niece, who is five months old now. And she just has a phone stabbing her in her face to show her videos and stuff like that. So I'm very curious about how the future is going to shape and if they're going to be ready for a future in which they had the need for human interaction that, yeah, and I didn't stay in topic and like, stay out of memory lane for a second. I think I love what you said about the need for digital skills. I think specially because it comes to how are you supporting people who don't have the digital skills? So for example, a baker doing a pandemic? What could they have done? If they have all these products? What's a digital avenue to bring that product to customers? And figuring out those solutions? I think creative problem solving is something that's going to come in the near future with courses like with courses online or, or face to face, learning about other markets, learning about different user groups that are not like, like, logos and the need those supports.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Yeah, no, you're speaking of bakers. And it's really interesting. One of our family friends, she is just in university. Now I think she's in first or second year. But she started her own baking business from her, you know, her kitchen, and she built her online presence. And now she's getting like, She's literally paying for her college or like university education through, you know, baking. And it is so amazing to see, because the only thing that we had when we were kind of in that place was really to go out and get a part time job. A lot of kids are not doing that anymore. Kids are getting very creative with how they're earning money. For you know, something like that. And over the last year, I've seen her Instagram accounts grow like crazy. All of us get all of our big goods from her because she's absolutely amazing. And we want to support a small business. And she got really creative. And I think that is so amazing. And that's power of digital media and the the tools that are available. And it doesn't have to be crazy, it's something as simple as using your iPhone, that's all she uses, basically, to have an online presence and to get orders. And she has a very simple website, she accepts orders, and she's making a lot of money. And she's paying her way through college, just by having this great idea and the skill but she has. So it just the opportunities are endless, especially for women, I think it's just such a phenomenal space to be in. And we kind of don't really put the two and do together. And I really want to encourage women I'm like, think of the possibilities. There's just so many the fact that you don't have to like you know, be in a particular location. Like I just love the fact that you can be like location independent. And a lot of people are working from home now, which has really given especially for women, you don't have to have that like traditional nine to five where you have to sacrifice your personal life or you can spend time with your parents or with your kids or your loved ones like all of those things that we used to cry about as a women and their careers. I think a lot of those hurdles are being taken away and having a digital career can really put you in that really powerful position where you don't have to sacrifice any of your life. to still have an amazing career, you can still do everything and feel fulfilled because you're still doing amazing things. You're being of service to people and still taking care of your loved ones. And being part of that will experience because you don't want to miss out on that either. I don't believe in compromising either of those. So

Alex Villacis:

that's beautiful and a great way to finish this episode. Thank you so much for such a great conversation going deep into your story into how you got here, and to the great work that you're doing amazing. Thank

Rabeea Wajeeha:

you so much for having me.

Alex Villacis:

Is there anything you want to promote is there It can be anything can be your own work can be a book or movie, whatever you want. Just throw it in there.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

Yeah. Yeah, if you guys were looking to get in touch with me, definitely get in touch with me for anything related to your online needs. So social media marketing, website design, development. And also if you are someone who's looking to grow and learn accelerate, textile, the reader Academy has a tonne of great workshops that are happening as well. So just reach out to me at Ruby at Weijia. Most of my handles are with my name, so LinkedIn, Instagram, Facebook, everywhere you can find me and I'm super excited to get in touch with you all.

Alex Villacis:

Thank you so much. I put everything in the show notes. And like stamp of quality. If I have any stamp of quality, I want to like put it right here.

Rabeea Wajeeha:

You are amazing. Thank you so much for having me.

Alex Villacis:

And there you have it, friend. Here was my conversation with Rebekah. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I enjoyed recording it because yeah, it was great. I've been in contact with her for a while now since I joined clubhouse and I found her the sign talks club that now has almost daily conversations on the startup club club on clubhouse. I know I'm using club way too many times, but it's just like third trademark. But yeah, like I said, I've taken courses, BRAVIA on accelerator and they're super interesting. They're super affordable, and very diverse and very diverse topics. She worries about getting good speakers and materials and like I said on the pod, it's about there's a lot of interaction it's not just like talking to a recording there's actually an interaction which I personally love. So I hope you love them too. You'll find the information in the show notes as well as multiple ways to get in touch with rubia and yeah, she puts out amazing content, I cannot be wrecked again. If I have any stamp of certification or approval this would be it. Thank you so much for listening again to another episode of the podcast and I hope you enjoyed it please feel free to leave us a review or reach out to us on Instagram or Facebook you'll find the links in the show notes as well as the buy me a copy links in case you want to do that. And yeah, I hope to be in your ears again next week with another interview. Keep learning stay curious and see you soon. Bye