Do I need school to be...

a podcaster/speaker? with Randall McKeown

September 30, 2021 Alex Villacís Season 1 Episode 10
Do I need school to be...
a podcaster/speaker? with Randall McKeown
Show Notes Transcript

Here we have Randall McKeow, a fellow podcaster who has done a bit of everything. Randall has worked in tourism, done photography, written many books and published multiple podcasts and how is looking to put everything under one awesome umbrella called Podvault.ca
In this episode Randall takes us to vulnerable stories about the teachers that didn’t believe in him, how education has changed in his lifetime and where he hopes is will go, how he got into podcasting and why he loves it so much. 

Are you curious about Randall? Here are some ways to learn more:
 Podvault.ca’s Website
Instagram
LinkedIn
Facebook
Twitter

Randall’s Podcasts:
My episode of Passports and Postcards Podcast on Apple Podcast
Red Light Conversations
The Rest of Your Story

This we mentioned on the episode:
Real Talk Podcasting
Branden Ushio Microphone Recommendations

In an effort to make this podcast accessible, we make transcripts of every episode. You’ll find the transcripts on our website here, https://doineedschooltobe.buzzsprout.com
Want to support the pod? Follow us on social media, share us, review us or buy us a coffee!
Instagram
Facebook
Buy me a Coffee

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/dinschool2b)
Randall McKeown:

started off with using a cheap microphone. And the sound quality wasn't too bad. compressing it spent a lot of money. But as you get more and more into it, and if you have the funds invest, because it's investing in yourself, not just in the podcast was investing in yourself.

Alex Villacis:

Hello, friend, and welcome back to another episode of Do I need school to be a podcast in which me Alex is going to sit down with people in the creative field? And I'll ask them questions about their journey more specifically about their education, how they learned their trade, who are their mentors, who are their mentors, what books influenced them, and hopefully find some answers that will maybe guide you in your journey in the creative field. Everybody's different, and we all learn in different ways. So of course, we're all going to take different paths, and they're all valid. In this show, I am celebrating any type of education, whether that is formal education, whether that is self taught, whether that is the internet, it doesn't matter. We have so many options today, and I want to talk about it. So let's talk about it. And let's have some fun together. My guest today, my guest today, his name is Randall, and he's great. That's all I can say. No, I mean, I'm gonna say more. Of course, Randall is a podcaster, entrepreneur, writer, creator, travel lover who currently is in Canada. He's a pretty cool dude, we met on clubhouse on the community of podcasters. And what I love about him is that he's he's always there to support other people answer questions share from his experience. And, yeah, you're gonna hear about it on the episode, but he's a really cool dude. He's all his information is in the bio, if you're curious. And yeah, I'm just too excited for this conversation. I'm going to shut up now and welcome you to my talk with Randall. Hi, Ron, how are you today?

Randall McKeown:

Good. How are you? I'm doing fine on this beautiful Saturday morning here.

Alex Villacis:

Amazing. So today we're gonna be talking about your podcasting career. So let's start with telling the audience who you are and what you're currently doing.

Randall McKeown:

My name is Randall McHugh. And I'm just launched my company called pod file pod CA, which is home to three podcasts that I do. So I do passports and postcards, which is a travel podcast. And I do read like conversations. And basically that is his commentary on real life events I think he would think of if you're stuck at a red light in traffic. And that one is I don't really put a lot of effort into it. But it just comes out in there are people listening to it, so I have to keep it going. And last but least something I just launched recently is Randy rugby podcast, which is here in Canada, we're getting to new leagues of rugby. And I wanted to jump on board before they launched to try to promote both leagues and show for show that's what I've been doing. Those are the three podcasts under that umbrella of pod fall.ca

Alex Villacis:

I will definitely listen to the one about rugby because for the life of me, I don't understand it. I remember the first time that I watched the game, I was like, Oh no, the ambulance is here. And he's like, yeah, honestly, a game where the ambulance doesn't show up. It's some pretty boring one. I'm like, oh my god. So cool.

Randall McKeown:

I can agree with that we had to have a professional team like Chris Chu versions of rugby, rugby league and rugby union. People get all confused. To be honest, I don't understand the sport 100% when we first got our professional rugby union team, I contacted the team and said look, I'm a photographer. I like to come and photograph the games if I can. So we got press access to the field to the players for the first inaugural season to pandemic are still playing their play in the United States are not allowed to cross the border. So they are playing out of a city called Atlanta and I'm waiting to COVID runner control and we can get the team back here in Toronto if I can get back to the field so it was interesting are going to the games I had something to do on a weekend now it's I do my podcast I do my editing I do my writing so you know when something ends something new begin so one door shuts the new door opens.

Alex Villacis:

I love that that's that's such a great mindset to have. It's like there's always gonna be the next thing that you can get passionate about. you're passionate guy. You just find passion in everything that you do. And so you're doing three podcasts. How did you get into podcasting? And did you just learn as you went? And I am asking this because during the pandemic, so many people started podcasting. And yeah, how did you start?

Randall McKeown:

Well, it was very interesting because I'll be everybody know that I'm an introvert. So we really don't like to be in The spotlight. And I said it in my head. But meanwhile, when something happens, I'm the one rated in front. So I don't know how that happens within podcast. formal education, I didn't really have formal education, I guess. I would say back in the 80s, I took radio and television broadcasting at college, and graduated from that. But really, when I graduated, there were no jobs in the industry. So I moved to a different, different stuff altogether. So for the last 40 years, I've been doing more management more working for the government. And always being an entrepreneur. My last chain job was in the travel industry. I was doing that from home. And as the demo came and shut down, I wanted to keep the dream of travel. I'm so I'm like, What do I do? Well, I was already looking at writing. But that's when I podcast you know, I have a story to tell. And when I wanted to do is the first season I spent just talking about my travels, and I've travelled 13 countries over a dozen cities where I wanted to build trust that way. Well, we just starting off with something you don't know how to do it, you know, like, yeah, okay, can find a mic somewhere. And I had a few mics around here. I don't know why I think I'm always competing with my younger brother with. And so I try to make sure I have something better than he has. But Joyce said, Okay, well, how do I do this? How do we do a podcast? Well, the first thing I found out was, I was using a platform called anchor. And I was doing that for the red light conversations. That was pretty simple, because I did everything on my phone. So whenever we park somewhere to go into whatever the subject was of the day, and will comment on it. And that was okay. And I said, Well, yeah, but I want to do something about the travels. So then, of course, having to work from home. Not really we were locked down. We refer still in from October here. First, okay, well, let me go online. And nowadays we have all these YouTube, we have reconstructions online. And yeah, they can give me advice over but what you don't have someone physically with you to help you. You're like, I gotta learn this on my own. So it's like, when I go back and listen to my first podcast, and I go, Oh, my God, that's awful. Like, why would anybody listen to it? But they do. And then I found the clubhouse, and we clubhouse on Rgp. These are people that I community that are podcasters that are been doing it for a while and started asking questions and mic technique, looking at the equipment I had, and even though it was okay, because people were listening to the podcast, leave that comment, people go, Wow, your podcast got a lot better. The sound quality is a lot better. You got music in your podcast, it's not just you talking, you're doing interviews with people from all over the world. And you learn by like I'm the type of person I learned by doing Oh, again, if you ask my wife, I'm a her IT guy because you would know I don't have a certificate in in computer or that field. Whenever a technical issue, I can go and because I've used so many computers over the years, I've gone from PC to Mac back to PC back to Mac's and now I have a little bit of everything. The only way to do is learning by clicking here and clicking they're trying to is trying that. And reading so it's been very interesting in in not getting a formal education and this I would say I did in a way if you look back at the radio and television, because when I took that course, we had to learn script writing. We did learn interview techniques, we to learn editing, but the old fashioned way where we had reel to reels. And we made it edit you had to slice it. Tape it does sound right oh, I cut it in wrong spot. So then you're cutting it again, try to make sure it fits properly. And show now everything's electronic. So you go in and do your edits using computer and I didn't know how to use Audacity like someone told me it's about dassie Well, that's fine. That's like saying here's the keys to cargo drive. You know, like you got to teach me and nobody there to teach me so I had to learn on my own. So formal education. Um, now I'm hoping there are courses out there will teach people how to podcast properly. And that's if there's any real steps in how to podcast because everybody's different. You might start off with music He might start off with a one for one podcast where they take a piece of important information from their interview and put that at the beginning of the podcast just to lead people into the podcast. And then they might say, okay, you're listening to whatever show you're listening to. And to get into the conversation or whatever they're talking about. I've adapted, I've learned to do different things in mind, I'm now using music at the beginning, I have a voiceover intro for the podcast, then I go in and do the interview at the end or to call to action, tell people where they can find me. And all that is trial air. So I always say that you really can't break a computer. Well, unless you drop it, or spill coffee on it. But he, he didn't learn to just not be afraid of trying things out. So I started off with using a cheap microphone, and the sound quality wasn't too bad. I'm not saying you have to spend a lot of money. But as you get more and more into it, and if you have the funds invest, because it's investing in yourself, not just in the podcast was investing in yourself. And you know, how we say I'm here to help new podcasters questions, I don't have all the answers. I can always help. That's how I got here.

Alex Villacis:

That's so cool. That's so cool. And it's interesting, because when you were talking about how you were editing in before in there during your formal education, when you're editing audio, I relate that to my design education that when I was during my first degree, which was technical degree in graphic design, we were looking at typography, and they told us okay, when we in the past before you had InDesign and computers and everything, you would actually have you had text centre. So these people like said on the board, the individual letters, and then a paper, ink on top paper press, that's how you made a page. And it was the same thing. I know how to do this on InDesign. But having that experience taught me how to process it better. It's like, Oh, now I know why I'm doing this, it completely breaks your mind. And but there's also a lot of being self taught. So you would you say you are self taught, Seth Godin says that it's give yourself to the process and let the process teach to you.

Randall McKeown:

That's correct. You know, you do it once and listen to it, especially when it comes to podcasting is trying to listen to it. And you have to, you have to think about what does the audience hear? When you're talking, whether it be to a person in public, or on a phone, or in this particular case, you hear your voice over and over again, you don't know. You don't know for this case, your voice and your voice. And, and there are so many people that say I hate my voice. I hate listening to my voice. And I'm like, they have a great voice. So what I say to them is, I think what happens is we hear it so often we don't know how good it is. I, I struggle with confidence at the beginning with my podcast in the sound of my voice. But then more and more. I've been in the rooms, the traditional audio room. And people come to me and say, Oh, you got a great voice and what are they smoking because I don't like my voice. But again, I get a lot of compliments. So I continue on. And it's funny because my audio teacher or my radio teacher back in college, he said this, and it really stuck with me. He says, You're too ugly for radio. And let me explain what I mean by too early for radio. I'm a fast talker. Well, I used to be. And I used to get excited in all the words would run together. So to be an on air personality, you have to be clear and precise. So people can understand what you're saying. But if I talk to you really fast and say this is like really, I'm really excited. And people are like, what the heck did he just say? Let me play rewind and see. But again, that taught me right there that and again, I'm involved in Toastmasters that helped me as well to be able to get my message across and think before you speak and try to formulate in your head before it comes out of your mouth. Sometimes it works the other way around. It comes out like what did I just say? Also European involved in your union. And being a leader in the Union, you have to get on stage and talk to the masses. I've talked to crowds of 500 Plus, and I've had to learn to slow down and let people hear what the messages because if I talk too fast, like it lose them. They're gone. They didn't hear the message. So I've had a lot of experiences in life to help me get better. So, if I could go back to that radio teacher and say, am I too ugly now?

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, I can relate to that so much. I am an extremely fast talker, especially in Spanish. And I too have to think the entire time in the back of my head, slow down, speak slow. I love that. So you have so equal to your teachers, you have that one teacher in college, who told to tell you where to ugly for radio, then you have your own process, trial and error. That's also a type of teacher you're learning from them. You have RTP, and you have Toastmasters? How would you say all those teachers and they're all at different points in your life? Would you say that their teaching style has changed, or that education has evolved from then and now because there are also different mediums one was face to face, the other one is through clubhouse or another audio medium?

Randall McKeown:

Well, it's talk about how education has transformed in my education, I could still continue to get education. I'm taking extra courses, like I did my college. And then in the early 2000s, I went back to college and to take business communication and also accounting. But when the pandemic came out, I also signed up for courses at Johns Hopkins University, and also Imperial College one and just to understand COVID, and study of that type of disease. So education is ongoing. But what I what I find where education is improved is the fact that they've gone from just textbooks when I went to school was like, implement a textbook that was written by five or six scholars who recall that and it will based on their opinion, for whether you're learning history, or math or science, it is their opinion, basically. I hated English because we would read books and and the teacher would say, what was the author thinking that? I really don't know, because the author is not here. If I could ask her, I could find out. But again, that's interesting. She's telling us what she thinks the author talking about. If there's a story in a story, or a lesson in the story, nowadays, I think we need to get to exchanges. So because we're connected around the world, I have so many connections that when I get my news, I don't really get it from the news station, I get it from people in in the place in freaking verify what's going on there. I don't trust the news because they spin it in one direction. So we're talking about education, education has to evolve as well. So I think you can have like to see this model where you have education, where you can bring people from different parts of the world together for one study. But on an online platform, where they can share information between each other because we all have different perspectives. If you're learning something, you have someone that's from, say, Africa, or someone from Asia or from Europe, somebody from North America, South America, where Australia places like so if you had a mixed class like that you're learning from different cultures, different points of view. And I think that's how education evolved. But what I think about the teachers that I've had, and how it's changed is more available in one thing, because social media makes it possible. So we talked earlier about RTP, which is for those that don't know is well three guys, three guys, but their community as well. So it's not just them, their community is positive built of people who know the business of podcasting. For if you have a question, you can go to these people, it's almost instantaneously get answer back. Whereas when you're doing traditional school, you have to wait till you're in class, ask the teacher to question if the teacher is not available 724 let's just say these guys aren't but they seem to be. Because everywhere I go, they are. And all these new social audio platforms, they go from one, one, theory on one, and they jump to another one. They're there too. So they're, they're always around. So I think being able to have access to your mentors or your teachers and to teach in an open style where all opinions are accepted. And we look at it from a different we're looking at a global perspective rather than just local. I think education is often it needs to evolve a little bit more. And just want to talk about one teacher that she said something to me high school graduation that set with stuck with me forever. I was walking across the stage, I get my high school diploma. And she said, and I had her for English for like five years. And she said, You will never amount to be anything. Now that was to say that when you're graduating day, you're walking across the stage, she was presenting me with my diploma. That to me, it was a challenge. I think maybe in high school, I was mediocre. I was a more of an introvert and I really didn't participate. I did in history, because I really love history. But also other classes. I just, you know, whatever the assignment is, I'll do it, just good. Send it in. But I really didn't participate. I think what her thing was, is, I had a problem with punctuation, grammar, and spelling. It was a great storyteller. But I put it out on paper. I get my, my report or my assignment pack, and it would be 90%. red circles this this year. And I would ask her, I said, Did you read the story, you look at the story, not just the spelling and grammar and punctuation. But you read the stories because this was a great story. But you need to learn how to write in proper grammar. I said, I'm a storyteller, not a writer. Now we have tools out there that will help you with your spelling, grammar and punctuality. And I appreciate that because being an author, having your books, people want to read it, and they want to make sure that this code is corrected. And we didn't have that back then. So I was like, I think I might have a problem learning English. Speaking it, I didn't have a problem. And telling story didn't have a problem. But yeah, education is involved. And it needs to continue to evolve. I think teachers need to be a little cognitive of what they say to their students, because it could stick with them for life like that commented and like the one in college did. But what I've been able to say is I stand here while I'm sitting right now, but what I mean is, when I stand here, I can look back and say that was a challenge. And I've met that challenge. And I've surpassed that challenge. So if I could go back to those two teachers and say, Look at me now, look at me, now I've made it. And it was because you lit a fire under me.

Alex Villacis:

That's impressive. It's it. I think it takes a very particular type of strength to take comments like that, and say, You know what? You're trying to bring me down, I'm going to flip it around on you. That's a challenge. Now, that's not it's your opinion. But I'm going to take it as a personal challenge, that that's incredible. I'm loving this conversation, because I'm getting so much more insight into you, and into why you do the things the way that you do them. And it's very, very impressive. And you're totally right. I think that education has to evolve. I had an interview with an illustrator a couple days ago. And he was saying that formal education has to match what we can get for free online, so we can get RTP. So formal education has to match that they have to match the quality that RTP is putting out. What I love about it is that it's people who are knowledgeable in the field, but in genuinely want to give information out it's they're not asking you to give them $1,000 or 1000 euros for a course they just genuinely want to help they genuinely want to create this platform. And to give you an example of how they have helped me. When I started the podcasting journey was for a nonprofit, and I got this microphone from them. And it wasn't great and said it. I love it. I want to keep doing this. I'm going to get on microphone myself. And I wanted to get x brand. I don't want to say I don't want to say brands because I don't want to trash anybody's product that I told them about it in a conversation and they were all like no, no, don't get that no, don't like why why it's not good quality. We have a website about it. I will link that in the show notes about why we hate that brand. And we hate that Mike, here are three other options. You can go to Brandon's, I'm gonna probably also link Brendan's information in the bottom. He has three recommendations. I followed it and I'm very happy what I got. And could I have gotten that align? Can I get to reveal nine? Yes, that these are people that I trust. They have my trusty they tell me to get this mic. I will get it that will trust them.

Randall McKeown:

Again, you know, the podcast journey, finding people that are in there, and that's the thing about it is this community is, you know, it's not just Roman Tanner and Pedro. Yes, they might have put it together, but it's everybody else in the room. So we've met so many people and what I found is that truffle audio, sometimes it's difficult because, again, we're trying to support our community, but they're in all different rooms. So you get two stars. Here in this room, that person in this room, we try to support them. Meanwhile, we have work to do, we're gonna have podcasts Do we have a job to do? We have time to spend with family that's you know, they're going, Oh, that's what you look like we haven't seen you for what's and you got a clubhouse in January, while you come out of your room. It's like, so it's and I'm hearing that now it's like, you know, now that a new social platform just sort of started the other day. Yeah, so checked it out. But this is way too much way too much. I need to spend more time it's here summertime hearing in lovely Canada. The temperature beautiful. We got my patio set up so that I can get outside and yes, I can listen. But I rather be present with the people that are around me. And so a little bit less time on social audio. hate to say it. But more podcasting. Taking a couple of months off summer for podcasts and say that just I say that today. I get another person who says, Oh, I really want to do your show. Okay, come on, like we recorded I really don't want to go on until September that season for what? Yeah, I don't like what I'm doing now is I can people ask me Come on their show like you have. So I don't mind that. And each Saturday morning, it's a good time for me because we don't really do anything till after lunch time. So I've got a couple hours ago, but I'm up usually get up early because I like to get in here and either I'm editing or I'm working on the next next best thing. or working on myself which is time well spent.

Alex Villacis:

self care, self care. That's what that's telling yourself. And that's what our teacher experienced that teach that teaches you that you can take time off to do things and that just because you say no right now doesn't mean you're saying no forever. It's just taking care of yourself and having your priorities straight. That's amazing. So and now that you are an experienced podcaster Do you see yourself as a teacher? Or do you see yourself with pod vault? Do you see yourself putting it when they together and if a young any young Spry voice came to you and said Randall I want you to teach me would you do it? Would you

Randall McKeown:

well that's something I looked out because he sort of sent out ahead of time to me so I could look at it and give it some thought. And I'll take it in my whole life because again even in my work my day Monday to Friday job I'm more senior than some of the people that I work with like 20 mid 20s for Look at me as grandpa but they come to me and they say can you help me you know this is new to me I'm not used this programme he helped me go in and what am I supposed to be doing? And I would love to be able to do that I love to be able to take them and walk them through it unfortunately I don't know at all even though I've been around a long time I don't know what also I hate just hear someone wrong but what I'd rather say to them is look let's come together I can be like a mentor we can work together I'm here every need to reach out if I don't know the answer I can we together we can find someone who knows the answer so we both learn at the same time I find myself more as a mentor in a different area so when it came to pod vote in an equation of that company basically what I'm saying is even founded in our clubhouse platform where there are new people coming and going I haven't started a podcast yet I have this great idea. I don't know what to do and I'm off mic I'm saying just do it. You know like if you have an idea just do it. You don't need permission to do it. But if you're struggling away, reach out you know like yeah, I have my phone with me all the time. So there's messages coming in from whether email text messages, Instagram messaged Facebook messages. I'm there I may not be able to answer you this minute. As I see all young people just like, Oh, I got this email. I gotta answer right away. Well, no. Telephone for me breeze. But I'm there for people to say look, this is the mistakes I made. Let's see if we can help you avoid that mistaking maybe avoid that step. But sometimes the best way to learn is to make those mistakes. If you make those mistakes as you go you're listening back and go oh, like I have a bad habit. I'll just say one bad habit when I'm talking to a guest says I do. My due to sound and then when I hear it in my in my podcast, I'm going What the heck are you doing? Well, you do that? Or or what I say is I'll be honest, I say that a lot. Before You're a liar. Randy, are you a liar? You're just gonna be honest, is what it is. But it's still phrases that you know we have to learn to take out It's a filler, with Toastmasters to teachers, and ours to take those out of your conversation. If we don't know what you want to say, Take a breath space, silence is golden, you move forward to the next message or point of view you're trying to get across residency. I really don't know. But those things like to be a mentor, I'd rather be a mentor than a Teacher, teacher. And I'll be what I'm going to say here is in my day job, employer tells me Oh, you signed up for this training, and this person gave it to you. Now what happens is, we might have a person that's more advanced than me, maybe younger, but they know the subject up here. And they're trying to teach it to me here, down here. But they talk up here. So when I'm done an hour training, I'm still as clueless as I was, when I started. What I say to the employer, and as a union person, say to the employer, provide training, get me a certified teacher, that someone is doing the job, because the person doing the job, they know their subject, yes, but they don't know how to bring it down how to use the word dumb it down to the audience. So the understand. We had two people just recently retired one was a former school teacher before she came to work in the government. So she had that ability to say, Okay, here's a subject, but notify, it's like, look around the room, or if my audience, my audience, it's a little bit so and started to basics, talk to them at their level. Best training was from her. So, yes, we may know, everything there is to do know about podcasting. But you have to know who you're talking to, if it's someone starting brand new, bring it down, bring it down, saying okay, talk about the simplest thing, whether it's is you're gonna be a solo podcast, we're gonna have interviews are gonna be going on the road, as travel restrictions lifted, you can move around and have live person interviews. First, identify what your subject is. So those things, we can work on those things, as a mentor, but I don't have the qualifications to be a teacher, I didn't go to school to become a teacher. So for me to say, I'll be your teacher, that's a lie. I'm being honest, that would be a lie. Because I'm not a teacher, I can help you as a mentor, as I've gone through these, but never ever call me a teacher.

Alex Villacis:

You're the first person that makes that distinction between a teacher and a mentor, in the sense that some people are great at teaching. And other people can speak from their experience and share their experience. But that is another part of the teaching. And sounds to me, like you're also coming from a place not of you know, the entire truth of the world. And everybody should listen to you, you're coming from a place of this is my experience, these are the mistakes that I make. Let's share, I'm going to share them with you and we're going to learn together, we're going to grow together, which is what a mentor really is. It's a relationship that goes back and forth. But I love the distinction that you're making, and how you're putting that a teacher needs to be able to teach you to have the training to be a great teacher. And to me, a great teacher is somebody that can not only bring a subject down to you, but also can make any subject interesting to you. Where in creative education, which is educating people on something that is not objective, like math is objective math, you get the result that you have to get. But then in things like art, design, writing, podcasting, these are all subjective, what is good to me might not be good to you, and what's good to the world might not be good to anybody else. So where do you see this education going? Do you think it's missing something? Do you think it's going in the right direction? Where do you think it will head in the future?

Randall McKeown:

Well, I can only talk about when I was at school, and then when my daughter was in school where the key focus was on your main subjects, which was like history, geography, English, math, different math. A couple of things to school is like, again, the government's here. I don't know what it's like where you are, but I know Governor's here, keep on cutting back on education. And I think that's where they need to invest and even invest in young people. I think parents are responsible and I think teachers are responsible for allowing us to be creative. I think with me in my growing up, there was a lot of lonely times. So what I did is I found things to be creative, whether it be real poetry, did a lot of drawings. You know, I doodle I call it doodling. And some of them Wow, that's amazing artwork, can you can you just Can I have it? Like, okay, we'll just take it. But being a creative is sort of frowned upon because it's like, oh, I'm just gonna play your artwork, nobody's gonna. Nobody's gonna listen to your podcast. Nobody's gonna think like me music you know all your bands ever going anywhere because you know how many bands are out there how many never ever, ever, ever shut someone down if they have an idea where it comes to be creativity, whether it be a writer, a poet, I used to write a lot of poetry. I would go with that. Um, we talked about that earlier. Um, but when I was younger, I wrote a lot of poetry. And a couple of people that I was with in high school, we we put it in a booklet and we sold it for so we sold it for like 10 cents a copy really didn't. didn't cost a lot of money back then to just print it and get it out. But then you take a lot of flack from the other, you know, the jocks. It's like, what are you guys writing poetry? For? What are you weird? No, we're creatives and went into drawing. Not really good painter, though. We need to take art in school, they got to teach you all the different aspects, whether it be oil painting, with sculpting with clay, whatever. And I was only really good at drawing for what I was doing the other stuff I really wasn't interested. But I would do it because that's what I had to do. I find that there needs to be a better outlet. For creatives. I think that communication is a big creative step. And people need to be encouraged to public speaking, it's important to get your message across. It helps in your personal relationship, it helps you in your work relationship. Creativity helps relieve stress. And I find that when I'm drawing or if I'm doing a podcast, or the pressure seems to come off, or the daily pressures of work come off, I just because I'm talking about something that I really enjoy. schools need to I like to see that when you are in school that you know, maybe radio stations in schools, I know some colleges here have their own college stations, but I played for podcasters a place for singer performer theatre is important I studied theatre I studied, I was part of when I was in college. But I continued that on into later in life when I got involved community theatre and help set design and I was a lighting planning board operator. And watching all aspects of creative activity coming together to make one big performance. And hear the roar of the crowd at the end of that is amazing. You know, and now I don't know if you're familiar with the NF t so like these memes that people are buying. So never ever discourage someone from you know, drawing something or painting something or singing something cuz you don't know where it's gonna go, they could probably it could happen where someone say, hey, I want to know pay a good price for it. So they can make more money in one sale. And they can make it a whole career After studying math and science, like you say with All Things versus a specific outcome. You can't You can't say well, two plus two equals five because it never does. But a painting can to one person may see something in that painting, someone else will look at it see something different. That is reflective of what they're thinking. And I don't think we're actually pushed to be thinkers anymore. I think we're spoon fed a lot of stuff, especially schools. And I don't like that of a given example, history class, high school, just going back in the late 70s, early 80s. We're using a textbook. And it was a we're setting the American War of 1812 between the United States British against the Americans. We're using a textbook and in the textbook, one of the authors was to teach her father, teacher father's American. We reading perspective and from the American point of view, not to say that, you know, I wasn't there, I don't know. But because I was having interest in history, what I would do is in the summers we would travel these historic sites and I would read information I would visit the places physically I would read a lot of books about history, especially about Canada. When I started reading this textbook to teachers spewing out this information saying this is the way it was just happened, I just in Canada never went numbering the white, white house. Well, we did. The British went down and did that. So, again, when you're getting education, you're getting spoon fed the way they want you, or whoever the head of the curriculum as for, say English or history, they lead the way I think we were all smart enough. Now we have technology so we can always look online and not everything online is correct. I'm not saying you're going to get all the tools online, we have so much information at our hands that we can go and make our own decisions about things in life. for teachers would start thinking like, look at it, globally, a point of view, rather than a local point of view, I think we can get ahead in in creatives will, will thrive. If the allows them to thrive. I rather see so one winner being a graphic designer, or whether podcaster or a musician that somehow that freedom to express themselves. And not to say there's no money to be made in that because when it can be made so never discouraged. That's all I can say.

Alex Villacis:

What a great way to end this episode. That said, so much wisdom in there. Randall I, I love that. It's like never discouraged to creative. Thank you so much, Randall for your time and he's interviewed has been really wonderful. Is there something that you want to promote pod vault maybe?

Randall McKeown:

Well, I can just see when Paul vault.ca. It's my new website. And one of the things I love doing is promoting travel that really promoting him, just keeping the idea of travel. Because we talked to a lot of people and they say, Oh, I really don't travel when you actually talk to him. I said, Well, what did you do yesterday said I went to the store, where's this tour? Oh, it's about four blocks away while you travel. So it doesn't matter where we go when we travel. So I try to keep the dream alive and vault was formed. Because what happened is I have three podcasts I mentioned earlier. And also I had the books. The other books that I've written, also wrote one book for how to use anchor to create your first podcast. And that's a sort of like ebook. It's on Kindle. It's a Kindle book, I should say on Amazon. But I need to also show when I started podcast is what the podcast doing one podcast are talking about? Well, the main podcast is about travel. I write travel books for linked the two together. So how's everything under one thing and your puzzle puzzle also is there to help young, up and coming podcasters I'm here as a mentor, not as a teacher, or as I mentor to help you along, walk together, make mistakes together. But I'm here to help. So if there's people out there listening to this, that they need to reach out. I am here my social media links are on on the [email protected] And like I said, You know, I can't have a lot right now because of restriction. So if you need to reach out, I'm usually available. Almost 724. But I sleep a bit. But yeah, so that's all I'm really promoting right now. The fact that it what I want to say to young people is, don't give up on your dreams. Just continue pushing forward. Sometimes your family doesn't understand what you're doing, your friends don't understand. But just keep on doing it. Don't be discouraged. Because I would say now, where I am right now and some of the guests I've had on my shows that are from around the world, and where my podcasts are being listened to people are my family and say, Wow, I can't believe how far you've taken in less than a year is a bit less a year. I started June 30. So coming up to my first year anniversary. All together, I've done over 110 episodes on three different podcasts. I've had guests from around the world, podcasts have been heard on every continent. My message is getting out there. Keep the dream of travel, live, travel, you learn. It's the best education I ever got was to travel and actually physically see these places that we saw in textbooks. And I wish I could travel more. But you know what, that's fantastic. So that's how I'm promoting and promoting is live your dream. Don't let anybody knock you down. And don't always listen to teachers because they don't always know what they're doing

Alex Villacis:

Words To Live By ramble. Thank you so much for this amazing interview. And I hope we can talk soon. Well we'll see Darren clubhouse soon. Well, we'll see each other.

Randall McKeown:

Thank you very much for having me.

Alex Villacis:

I had a great time, talking Randall I actually also on his podcast and I will link that episode below because it's a it's a really fun conversation he's a really fun person to talk to and he's not only full of knowledge but also full of humour and everything he does just has this way of of lifting you. Like make you want to do better or make you want to try new things. So yeah, pretty inspirational. Dude, I think you notice from my voice during the interview that I'm very excited to talk to him. I hope you enjoyed this episode. And again, you'll find all randles information in the bio below. Thank you, friend for joining me today in this wonderful conversation. Like always, I'm happy to be in your ears. If you enjoyed this episode, feel free to reach out to us or leave us a review on your favourite podcasting app. And if you want to support the podcast, there are also links on how to do it in for example, buy me a coffee. I love coffee. I'm actually needing a cup of coffee right now but I don't have any coffee. little insight into my stupid struggles. Yeah, I hope you enjoyed this episode that you picked up something from it, and that you have a great day and hopefully see you next week. Bye.