Do I need school to be...

a singer-songwriter? with Josh Savage

September 09, 2021 Alex Villacís Season 1 Episode 7
Do I need school to be...
a singer-songwriter? with Josh Savage
Show Notes Transcript

This week on the pod we have Josh Savage. Josh is British born, Paris raised singer, songsmith & adventurer currently living in Berlin. Josh has has an ever evolving style, a soulful voice and a mind that is curious about people and places. In this episode we talked about his early education, why he fired his friend to teach him, the influence his grandfather had on his work, his tour in Mexico and much more. 

Josh is all over the internet, check him out:
Website
Instagram
Spotify
Patreon
Facebook Page

Josh’s book recommendations:
War of Art by Steven Pressfield
Non-Violent Communication by Marshall B. Rosenberg
(Full disclosure, these are affiliate links. Nothing changes for you when you shop but affiliate marketing helps support the podcast)

In an effort to make this podcast accessible, we make transcripts of every episode. You’ll find the transcripts on our website here, https://doineedschooltobe.buzzsprout.com

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Josh Savage:

And so last thing if you can't afford to do things, just think outside the box, what? What things can you give up? What things can you sacrifice that you don't mind doing for the, for the long term? So actually, yeah, so actually giving up on paying rent was a huge factor that actually allowed me to, to forge my my early steps.

Alex Villacis:

Hello, friends, and welcome back to another episode of Do I Need School to Be a podcast in which me, Alex, is going to sit down with people in the creative field. And I'll ask them questions about their journey here, more specifically about their education, how they learned or trade, who are their mentors, what books influenced them, and hopefully find some answers that can maybe guide you in your creative journey. Everybody's different, and we all learn in different ways. So of course, we're all going to take different paths and all are valid. In this show. I am celebrating any type of education and any type of teacher that taught you a lesson because anything can be a teacher. My guest this week is Josh Savage. Yes, you heard it here. Josh is one of the few people in my guest roster who I've actually met in real life. I first saw him play at a so far sounds in Hamburg. I saw him again in Hamburg. Then I saw him in Rotterdam. I've seen him play a bunch of times. He's a super talented artist. And a really nice guy. You'll hear in this episode, he is very passionate about his music, very passionate about community and about experimenting. And I generally nice human being, I hope you enjoy listening to me talking to I hope you have fun. Okay, so funny, fun story, everyone listening to this podcast, we had been talking for 15 minutes. And the recording was not going so just to to give you a fun, a fun introduction. I'm talking today with Josh Savage, who is a singer songwriter from England, but he lives in Berlin, and he was raised in Paris. If you want to learn more about that you can listen to all his songs. You have made a lot of love songs to Paris and to travelling around the world and

Josh Savage:

Mexico as well.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, Mexico. So actually, I want to I want to ask you about the experience that what how Mexico was a teacher to you because you have a song dedicated to your experience in Mexico and how it changed your mindset. I that's actually one of the questions I don't want to make you. So sorry for that. Maybe you can tell people again?

Josh Savage:

Well, we can we can start again, if you want I I didn't mind.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, but I just I want to include these parts in the podcast, because podcasts sometimes make you think like, oh, everything is perfect. It's like no, it wasn't it happen.

Josh Savage:

Haha true.

Alex Villacis:

I'm gonna show you after this the music for the that a friend of mine made me music for the podcast. Right now. It's so goofy. And I think it's gonna go perfect with this part of the podcast.

Josh Savage:

Fantastic.

Alex Villacis:

Please tell people who you are and what you do.

Josh Savage:

So my name is Josh Savage. I'm an indie pop singer songwriter from UK, based in Berlin. And I basically create music, I used to tour a lot, but obviously, that's not really an option anymore. So focusing more on just writing songs and releasing them at the moment.

Alex Villacis:

And you have been doing this for 10 or 10 years since you finished your formal education. So how did you get here? And what can you tell us about that?

Josh Savage:

So I so I started in the classical world first, my mum forced me to take piano lessons from the age of four, which I, which I hated and eventually stopped. But actually, I chose to pick up the lessons again, which was a game changer because I did it out of choice, not because I felt like I had to and then I started to really love music and pick up other instruments like trumpet guitar, and eventually singing. And, but the turning point for me was I got scouted to sing for choir in France, where I grew up, and I got really good classical training there, which eventually led me to be part of the National Children's Choir of Great Britain when I moved to the UK, and I toured Australia, New Zealand from the age of 12, which was a really valuable experience. And then when my voice broke, I kind of felt like I was starting all over again. And I was influenced by bands sight bass light, Coldplay and Snow Patrol and I started write my own songs. And then after that, I did a classical music degree at the University of York where I started playing bands. And then I took a gap year where I just wanted to play music in gig basically, which I did do. But it went so well, I thought, I'm just gonna do one more year, and then another year, and then 10 years later, so I'm still doing it, which is incredible.

Alex Villacis:

That's the dream. That's his dream to be like making your own music and pushiung it through. And you also told me like, I asked you about what effect formal education had on you. Because I think there is this debate in the music industry, whether you actually need formal education and go to conservatory and have teachers, because you can learn so many things online, you can just download a software and just mix your own tracks. And I wanted to ask you, like, What effect did for my education had on you?

Josh Savage:

Well, for me, for example, learning a lot about the classical stuff is was really important just to know how things work and figuring figuring stuff out on my own, which is really valuable and a lot faster with your progression. But I feel like the education definitely makes you enjoy it more and, and learn a lot faster. Like, for example, I'm trying to get more into production. So I have to rely on other people as much. Especially in the midst of a pandemic. And so I've actually hired a friend to go through learning Ableton because I used to do other doors like Pro Tools and logic. But a return for me, I really want to learn because it's very, very good for creative flow, which is what I'm all about, basically. And it's just so much more fun. I mean, I've tried to learn teaching myself through this second lockdown. And I was just banging my head against the wall, because, I mean, it's depressing being in lockdown anyway, and just didn't have much motivation. So I think having someone to keep you accountable is really important. Because otherwise, if you don't have deadlines and stuff like that, you never really make things work.

Alex Villacis:

That's so true. Especially with Netflix, you say like, yeah, I'm gonna do this lesson. But wait, dammit, my new show just came out on Netflix. I have to binge it. It's I have to, I have to know.

Josh Savage:

Exactly. And it's just that discipline is is really hard to sustain. But I think I've learned a lot about that over the years being independent and, and not having a boss but like me being my own boss. And actually just, I think not overworking is key as well. That's something I used to do, I just cry try and cram in so much in one day. And of course, I stress myself out and then the next day would be a write off. So actually just giving yourself realistic goals throughout your day. So that so that the next day you're inspired to work still I think having that inspiration and and working because you love it is really important to maintain. So for example, my schedule at the moment is I get up I go for a walk, or I write or read in the first few few hours that I wake up and I have a coffee. So basically kind of I I was the word I can't seduce myself out of bed by promising myself a coffee. I wish I recently got addicted to and that way it gets me out of bed and then I start work at 10 and work until six basically that's what I try to maintain anyway, obviously. I'm not perfect. But yeah.

Alex Villacis:

that sounds like such a nice routine. So quick question like outside of the topic. How do you drink your coffee?

Josh Savage:

I have it Americano black or espresso.

Alex Villacis:

Nice and which method do you use to for to make your coffee?

Josh Savage:

Well, I'm a noob. I used to be a massive tea drinker. But actually coffee is what kept me sane in the lockdown because I used to live alone and the only human contact I had was with a with a barista. So the only way to speaks another human being was to drink coffee, which I hated at the time bar so desperate for full contact. So I was still new, but basically I just make French press at home. But I tend to just in order to get me out of the house. I just just buy in Americo basically. Next door.

Alex Villacis:

Nice. I think so many people relate it to you right now. It's like my only human contact was the barista.

Josh Savage:

Yeah, honestly. And I just talk shit, but yeah, anything I could do.

Alex Villacis:

Hey, it happens. It happens. Lady Corona, you know, she has been a cruel mistress to us all.

Josh Savage:

Yeah, for sure.

Alex Villacis:

But going back to the topic of education, so before we we started not recording the first part This interview, you were telling me that you have a little studio now and you have been learning a lot about acoustics, and how to set it up properly. How have you been learning that?

Josh Savage:

So that I just looked online at the beauty of YouTube, it's amazing what you can learn on it is absolutely incredible. And so I learned all about the physics of soundproofing my room, so I could work efficiently in it. And I'm so happy with it, actually, my I actually managed to afford my studio because of my patrons. And I like two years worth of patient ship, which was able to invest in kind of keeping me through the pandemic. And I, and you have just got this gorgeous you with an upright piano that got 100 400 euros and stuff like that, then you Berlin. I know. Yeah. And we're also going to, yeah, YouTube and but actually. Sorry I have a hair in my mouth.

Alex Villacis:

People will not take help them, visualise, give it a shot, I have a hair, my mouth.

Josh Savage:

Sorry where was I going with that? I forgot.

Alex Villacis:

We were talking about how you learn to soundproof your room, and then you told us about your Patrons, and how they helped you have access

Josh Savage:

to all these things. And for me, that's crucial, because, I mean, I don't want to, I can work with other people for recording stuff like that. And, and I had a bit of work as a, as a vocal session, session player and, and I could just record that in my mic and set up here, which is pretty handy. And but yeah, but with, with with some stuff is is really useful just to have a mentor and someone just to keep you on par and, and actually, the classical education that I have, is really valuable for me, because I think that's one of the main things that actually makes me stand out still. I do wish I was better production and actually started on on the kind of computer side of things. But actually the fact that I have this knowledge of how things work on the piano, how things work on the guitar, is so valuable. And and actually some way I've been getting by financially is actually getting into teaching again. And because that's something I actually love doing and I'm very good at. It's not something I mind doing at all.

Alex Villacis:

Nice. And I want to talk about, I want to talk about you as a teacher actually a little bit later. But first, I want to know about your teachers, like who are the people that had an influence on you that you're making something or making a song you write and hear their voice in the back of your head or their advice or maybe something they told you that challenged you. And by the way by teacher I it can be anything. So in the podcast, I tried to put in a broader sense of the word so a book can be a teacher, or an experience can be a teacher and you have an entire song dedicated to Mexico, or your tour in Mexico. And how that changed her perspective and made those creative juices flow again. So while your teachers was Mexico a teacher?

Josh Savage:

How long we how long have you got?

Alex Villacis:

Ah, dang, it's a short for my podcast. So gosh, okay, let's start which was your favourite taco? Which was your favourite food in Mexico?

Josh Savage:

Oh my god.

Alex Villacis:

That's what our podcast but I'd like to.

Josh Savage:

I'm gonna get straight over drinks, but horchata.

Alex Villacis:

Oh, yeah.

Josh Savage:

I wish I could find some way good Berlin with that. Foodwise gosh, I mean, I just I just bloody loved it. I loved Mole con pollo.

Alex Villacis:

Of course.

Josh Savage:

Yeah. I'm in such a chocolate place.

Alex Villacis:

So, so good. So good. I am excited about going to Mexico and like eating, just eating. That's what I'm going

Josh Savage:

I'm so jealous. Well, I have great time for me for.

Alex Villacis:

I'll send you a pack of tortillas, don't worry.

Josh Savage:

But yeah, teachers. Well, actually, my grandfather was a huge teacher for me, he was he was a character. He he he often just randomly muttered poetry to himself. As he was like passing out with a class it was it was like clenching to a glass of wine in his hand. And, and we loved him so much. And anyway, he a lot of his poetry kind of merged onto me and my sister and he, he introduced me to some amazing parasite web sites, and all yaks rather. And Samuel Beckett and actually the the song that was the quote that inspired my song laughs in Paris was a Samuel Beckett quote that my grandfather introduced me to which was ever Note is ever tried, ever failed, no matter, try again, fail again, fail better. And that's, and the song is basically about me diving into the the music dream. And obviously I'm very much against the odds, because I think any artists, it's really difficult to make ends meet and to make it last. And so and obviously, I was just starting out and I had a lot of friends and family going I you shouldn't really do it, you should just do something more sense. And so I guess I was inspired by that at the time. And for me, I always wanted to move back to Paris. But I, for me, it wasn't really the best place for for music. And so I wrote that song, where I just kind of said, Well, I'm just going to try this dream. And if I fail, then I'm just going to keep failing. And worst case scenario, I just lose myself in Paris, and spend my life there, which is actually an amazing Plan B for me, so. So that was one. There's also an amazing book called The War of Art, which is kind of formed like the book The Art of War, which is an old Chinese proverb of a book, and both really clever, it's a really short book, which talks about resistance and overcoming over resistance and staying creative. That's fantastic book. There's an other one called, Oh, another one is nonviolent communication. I can't remember who the authors are, by the way, but actually nonviolent communication was a fantastic one for learning how to work with other people and also how to build relationships in a healthy and long lasting manner. And not just work relationships, but also close relationships as well. And I just have such a long list, but yeah, my grandfather was a great influence. Also my choir master who just always believed in me and, and, and helped me through in just developing as a singer, also the lead singer of of Snow Patrol, he actually discovered me on Spotify, and reached out to me. And that was incredible, because his band buddy inspired me to write songs. And to have one of your idols just reach out to you was incredible, because I just moved to Berlin as well at the time. And I was like, why the hell have I done this, this was such a stupid mistake. And it wasn't but you know, when your dad kind of get the better view and, and that was just incredible for me, just to kind of keep me going and, and I was just so inspirational, and he was just like, my mentor at the time, put me in, in contact with some really amazing people and, and just to have that was very surreal as well. And kind of made it all worth it. And, but for me, Mexico was a huge teacher as well, because at the time I was struggling in London, I was living in a warehouse of 14 people with bedbugs doing doing two to three part time jobs. And I was just wearing myself out and out of the blue. I got this email by this Mexican guy called our Friday going hey, I love your music. complain. It makes Canada Yeah, well. Easier said than done. I was I just booked my flights and I'll be there not expecting anything of it. And next thing I know he he booked the bloody flights and I found myself going to Mexico and sleeping on his sofa and playing shows that he organised and and for me that was just incredible to find all these listeners and meeting them in the flesh and and I played to 200 people at the ITAM University. I think it's good.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, ITAM.

Josh Savage:

Yeah, exactly. And, and just the people in Mexico, absolutely beautiful people and I don't think I had met nicest people in the world. which for me was such a contrast because living in London, if you make eye contact with someone you're seen as because everyone's so cold with each other because I think there's so many people in London. Everyone just hates people they just can't stand whereas Mexico was just completely the opposite. They just love people. So yeah, anyway, I could keep going but I feel like I'm just going on a massive rant.

Alex Villacis:

No, but it's great because it shows that there is the different ways to learn and sometimes opportunities just present to you. And you have to learn also that like what opportunities you should take, and what can you take away from each opportunity.

Josh Savage:

For sure.

Alex Villacis:

And there's so diversification that you have had from having formal to having mentors. So then having your friend teach you to then just having an entire country, the entire population, passively teach you teach you.

Josh Savage:

Yeah, 100%. And I feel the best thing I've ever learned is just trust, trusting people. And, and also, just with being organised, I feel like chess has been a great teacher for me as well, because it's taught me how to think a few moves ahead. And to always have a few strap strategies that are the go. So for example, when I was going out, crashing on people's sofas, on my living room tours and things like that, I always had a plan B, just in case, things went apart. Yeah. And that was really important. Just knowing that you have that second security.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, that's always good. Just have a backup plan. Just Have you never know, a pandemic could erupt at any second, clearly.

Josh Savage:

I think but always act optimistically. But have that realistic backup as well.

Alex Villacis:

Nice. And how has all these collection of experience influence you as a teacher? Because now you are back to teaching? Because you love it? And what type of teacher? Are you? Are you super critical? Are you let's go and let's learn together? What? How are you teaching?

Josh Savage:

The way I teach is that it has to be fun. And I try to assist, translate my love of what I teach more than anything, I feel like more than anything, I can only guide the way I can't do the work for people and that for in. So the best thing I can do is just make it fun. And in that way, my pupils are more likely to work harder in their own time. So I'm not, I'm going to be that person to keep people accountable. But I'm not going to be the one getting angry at people because at the end of the day, I can't force it out of them. And and if they don't want to do it, then that's that's their, that's their problem really. And, and they know that. So. And actually, the book nonviolent communication taught me that a lot as well. So yeah, I think it's just really important to just keep it fun, keep it creative, and just always just testing your boundaries and just making it just slightly outside your comfort zone that there's an amazing Bowie quote, actually, which taught me a lot with my music. And exploration. I'm, I'm gonna find it because otherwise I'll absolutely butcher it. I've got it in my notes somewhere. Oh, yeah, here we go. So Bowie says, If you feel safe in the area you're working in, you're not working in the right area, ways go a little further into the water, then you feel you're capable of being in go a little bit out of your depth. And when you don't feel that your feet are quite touching the bottom, you're just about in the right place to do something exciting.

Alex Villacis:

That's so powerful. And so true.

Josh Savage:

It's incredible. And for me, I think that's definitely something I've learned just to do with just my music direction as well. Because I used to be very folky acoustic, and I kind of got a bit bored of that. And just, I just keep pushing myself just outside my comfort zone. And that's what I tried to translate to the people I teach as well.

Alex Villacis:

And I can attest to that. If you look at the first songs that you have, like you have very, they're all very different special than you once. Yeah, if you could, for example, like last in Paris, and you go to golden years, and then you go to your latest versions, you see a growth and you see a difference. Yeah. And it's always you It always feels like you. It just feels like your curiosity really translates.

Josh Savage:

Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

Thats awesome

Josh Savage:

I just have to keep exploring. I think I'm, I'm, I'm an explorer and romantic, more than anything. And that's why I guess I'm just going to keep doing with the music as well.

Alex Villacis:

That's really great. And that's a really great lesson to give to the listeners just like stay always a little bit uncomfortable. A little bit in the place that you're like, I don't know what I'm doing. That's great. It's great that you don't know what you're doing, right?

Josh Savage:

Yeah. Because that's the thing actually failing is one of the best teachers as well, if to get to where I've come to now. I've failed a lot. But I've learned a lot from those failures and That's the best way to make sure you don't make those mistakes again, you know.

Alex Villacis:

So my camera went out just now, but I'm still here, I can still hear you. Um, the next thing that I want to ask you is, so you have your Patreon. And first of all, I love the names that you have in your Patreon, I think your last name lends perfectly to the tribe that you're building. That's so funny. How do you learn about Patreon? Or how it who introduced you to it? And how is the progress of learning how to build a community because Patreon requires a tighter community?

Josh Savage:

Yeah, there was a guy called Nate main guard that I met along the scene, who has been a massive advocate of it. And he'd been doing that for some time. And I knew about it forever. And I just couldn't bring myself to do it, basically, because I just felt like it was begging for money. And, and, and I felt like it was a bit cringe. But I think in this era, I don't think artists have a choice, especially musicians. Because our income used to revolve around sending CDs and, and downloads and things like that. And now that just isn't the case. Now, there's Spotify and streaming, which are also great things because I feel like they're a better version of monetizing illegal downloads that are happening like lightning wire and stuff. And actually, a lot of people discover my music because of Spotify. Yet, still, the the streams just aren't fair. Apparently, they all go to the labels and. And so yeah, basically, I can't really rely on the recording side of things for income. And then I used to survive on the live aspects of music, which now isn't an option anymore be selling honey, and selling Honey. Yeah, exactly. Gosh, so I, you know, this, but I released my debut album, literally the week after the pandemic started. And so I have this table right here, which consists of 500 vinyl that was that I was hoping to sell on tour, but obviously can't go on tour. So. So it's acting as my table in my studio at the moment. There we are. But anyway, but But yeah, so Patreon is just an incredible tool. And for me, it's not even about the money, which is so essential right now, and I really appreciate the support, but I just love the community aspect and get to know my, my patrons and, and like some of the tiers are where I literally have a one to one zoom chats with them, which is incredible, because for me, I'm definitely one of those people, I just want to get to know the fans as well, because I just have that intimate connection with them. And I feel that is because I have these really intimate songs. And the fact that my fans connect to that too is for me, it's just absolutely incredible. So I just love the community aspect of it. And, and and yeah, I've lost my thread now. But yeah,

Alex Villacis:

it's fine. And I guess like to my final question is, what do you think about how creative education is changing? Because for a while before, in Rome, when in the Renaissance, it was go find a teacher, golf shadow an artist and learn from them directly. And then we had institutions and conservatories in case of music, or universities in case of other creative professions. And but now we also have the route of going on Patreon and finding, for example, a mentor or going on YouTube and learning from it. So how do you think this is changing? And do you think that at one point, we will just go full on digital and forget everything else? Guess that's it's a human connection. Also very important, like you said, connecting to a community being pushed by a mentor or a teacher, be held accountable. So how do you think that will develop in the future?

Josh Savage:

That's a really good question. I, for me, university right now is an interesting factor. Because I don't know how, I don't know if it's the best investment of money anymore. For me, I really value my uni experience, but not because of the course but because of the experience. And that university experience allowed me to find myself and figure out what I wanted to do. And I feel that's the best thing that people get from uni. A lot of people don't actually follow their courses after they finish and graduate they actually do a completely different topic in work. So I do want it and in England Anyway, you Diversity is so expensive. I just don't know if that would be my best advice to people anymore. I think I learned a lot from travelling as well to figure out what I wanted as well. And, and actually, that money can be better invested, I think for sure. So I think, yeah, I think, if you know what you want to do, I think you just definitely have to go for it from the get go, especially from your late teens, early 20s. Just go for it, because because you're never gonna have this time over again. And we, let's face it, we don't know who we are in our 20s. And if you don't go out, then discover and make your mistakes early. You're never gonna find out. And probably you have those who have great regrets later on. So I think travel is an amazing teacher. And I think Yeah, fine, and travel, go to network as best as you can early. And yeah, pick up as many mentors as you go along. So I think this isn't something I advocate forever. But I think early on, just not having that problem of working for free is a huge teacher. Because if you think about it, if you're interning for someone, or you're helping someone out for free, you are learning the ropes and that and you're kind of getting education that way as well, which you you don't have to pay for because you're doing the work. That helps the the teacher as well. So, but obviously, at some point, you do need to kind of stand firm and know your value as well, which takes practice as well. So I think it just getting out there is the best thing you can do. And then the best teacher, really.

Alex Villacis:

I love that and you propose so many valid points from the economical aspect that a lot of people think I cannot do what I want, because I don't have the money to go to university, there are different ways of learning. And now with the internet, you can find how, like, if somebody wants to be a singer, songwriter, they can find you and connect you to Patreon. And you can tell them what steps you took. Or they can listen to this podcast and see what steps you took and just emulate those things. And yeah, that money is, is an art is the thing that's important. But how are you going to spend it? And personally, I think it's so unfair to ask an 18 year old, why do you want to do with the rest of your life? They don't know who they are.

Josh Savage:

I think even at 28 You don't need to be honest. Exactly.

Alex Villacis:

And that constantly changes and that constantly evolves and the things that you learn, teach you something like being dropped in a city that you don't know and be like, Okay, how do I figure it out? You learn so much through those experiences. And if not from the city from yourself.

Josh Savage:

Exactly. Just be a sponge, just take as much information as possible. Listen to all the podcasts and read all the books you can and just learn from other people actually a big I think a big game changer for me as well was reading a children's autobiography. Because I was wondering how the hell he started things and a big thing for him was Couch Surfing actually, which is what inspired me to couch surf like I did, because I've played up to 700 shows around the world and I didn't stay in fancy hotels or anything like that. I just stayed in front of strangers homes. And I read that Ed Sheeran did that and that was that way if he can do I can I can do that. And so last thing if you can't afford to do things just think outside the box what what things can you give up? What things can you sacrifice that you don't mind doing for the for the long term? So actually yeah, so actually giving up on paying rent was a huge factor that actually allowed me to to to afford my my early steps and he was also paying rent and really makes sense at the time anyway because I bounced around so much. It just didn't make sense and and it's just yeah, I think just thinking outside the box and just if it's been if it's been done before it probably isn't the best thing to do any any more. So actually a huge factor for me was so far sounds I caught on to it really early by just getting out there playing every single gig I could no matter if it was paid or not. And by discovering that community early that allowed me to actually build my own so far sounds city and growing my community there and then that way I managed to know every so far sales leader around the world and I did that for free. I did so far. Sounds awesome. Worked for so far sounds for two years, just hosting shows mostly in my mom's living room. And, and, and that was really valuable experience just to build my network because it was a great way to make contacts without having to travel because people came to us. And then we just had concerts in our living room with incredible artists. So that was valuable in that regard.

Alex Villacis:

That is so interesting, because a lot of creative people, you will tell them work for free, and they'll be like, Get away from me, the cross, I never work for free. But there is a benefit. You can get paid in networking options, or you can get paid in experience. Or let's face it, if you are in engineering, and you get a chance to do an internship with Elan Musk, and it's unpaid do it. I mean.

Josh Savage:

Yeah, of course. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

It's, I think the the key message here is that you can be paid in something other than money.

Josh Savage:

Exactly. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

That's amazing. Well, thank you so much for joining me today, Josh. This has been a really great conversation. And yeah, hiccups in the beginning hiccups in the beginning, but we we caught on everything like work work? Well, at least from my side. Is there anything you want to promote? Like your Patreon or your album that maybe your vinyls that are sitting there at the table right now?

Josh Savage:

I mean, yeah. I mean, first of all, check out check out the music, if you like it. And yeah. There's a Patreon page if you want to support and there's different tiers for whatever level of support and rewards as well. But yeah, I've moved on, I'm trickling out my second album, I'm releasing every six weeks, a single every six weeks, just now I just released compass in the dark, which is the third single, and just released a music video of me out in the desert on YouTube. And, and yeah, as much as well on on my website, Josh Savage, music.com. And if things go well, at all, finally, in October, September, October around the UK, Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Yeah, and if not, then I'll just keep postponing it at the moment is called the long the longer way round tour. And that's because the debut album is called the long way round. So because it's been postponed twice now it's called the longer way round. postpone it again, I guess I'm gonna have to call it the longest way around. And then I guess I'm out of ideas after that, but I think this is going to be the one so can't wait to talk and with bands. In in autumn, yeah.

Alex Villacis:

You should call that even longer way round before you call it. Just in case just in case. Yeah. Oh, I'll link everything in the show notes. And yeah, thank you so much.

Josh Savage:

Yeah, it's been fun. Thanks. Thanks for having me.

Alex Villacis:

Before I do the conclusion, I wouldn't choose Horchata, I will choose Jamaica. Yeah. I would choose Jamaica. That's my it's my preferred Mexican drink. But yeah, this was a really fun episode. I hope you enjoyed it. I might, I guess my question to you would be, what have you learned if you have travelled, even if you have travelled to the corner to get an ice cream or something? What have you learned in that trip? And if you have any fun stories to share with to share with me, just send them out to me on Instagram. That's where I'm mostly active. And let's just share that little knowledge that you have that no one else has in this world, because we're all learning all the time, right? Thank you, friend for joining me today in this conversation. I hope you enjoyed it, and that you picked up something from it. You'll find all the information to my guests social media, to their website, to the best way to contact them in the show notes as well as a transcript of this episode. Why do transcripts because not everybody has English as their first language. A lot of people have these abilities. A lot of people just don't enjoy listening to podcasts, but maybe they want to read this conversation. So you'll find links to that in our website, which is also in the show notes, as well as our social media handles, and etc. And if you wish to support the podcast in any way, just send me a DM, they brighten up my day. They're so fun. And there's also a link if you want to buy me a coffee. I love coffee. That's also nice. And you can also leave us a review in Apple podcasts or whatever platform you use to listen to podcast. And I think I'll make a newsletter. I'm honestly not sure. I'm still thinking about it. Maybe Maybe after Episode 10 I'll figure it out. But yeah, anything you want to do to support us will appreciate it and I hope you have an amazing day. Keep learning and stay curious.