Do I need school to be...

a musician? with Ro Halfhide

August 05, 2021 Alex Villacís Season 1 Episode 2
Do I need school to be...
a musician? with Ro Halfhide
Show Notes Transcript

This week we have Ronald Halfhide on the Podcast. Ro is a musician, producer, composer, singer-songwriter and teacher currently living in Rotterdam. During this episode we talk about how he got into music, his teaching style, his new album and how he learnt about jazz.

Find more about Ro here:
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Paint the Town on Spotify

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Alex Villacis:

Wow, that was beautiful wasn't it? Welcome friends to Episode Two of Do I need school to be..., an interview show in which me, Alex, sits down with people in the creative field to talk about how they learned our trade and their journey with education are all different and we all learn at our own particular ways. And in this show, I want to talk to creatives about what their experience has been, what experiences shaped them with teachers, and what they think will happen in the future of education. The clip you just heard in the beginning was actually Ro Halfhide. Who is the guest on this episode. You might not be familiar with his work, but you kind of are because he's also the person who wrote the music for this podcast. Yeah, that fun spiffy circus like tune that encapsulates the spirit of this podcast was written, made, composed. I don't actually know the verb to use here by him, an amazing musician from Rotterdam. He's gonna tell us in this episode about his experience teaching kids and music and how he got into this field. And yeah, it's gonna be a really fun conversation that I hope you enjoy. So here's my talk with Ro Halfhide. Yeah, and we're recording. So hi, Ro. How are you this morning?

Ro Halfhide:

Hey, Alex. Yeah, I'm good. Yeah, I'm good.

Alex Villacis:

Afternoon. Really?

Ro Halfhide:

It's afternoon.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah. You're there. The first person that interview who's also in the Netherlands.

Ro Halfhide:

Ah, that's why.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, that's why I say good morning, because I'm used to, like the other people that I've interviewed. One was in Germany, the other two were in the States. So I'm saying good morning right away. So yeah,

Ro Halfhide:

yeah, I'm good. I just came came home from from work. So yeah. Just chilling. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah. enjoying this beautiful Dutch weather that we're having right now.

Ro Halfhide:

Exactly. It's, it's crazy. It's hot.

Alex Villacis:

It's hard. And the trees all decided that they needed to make more trees and the pollen is all over the place. And my allergies are killing me. But my medication kicked in. So I'm ready for this interview.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, I have the same today. It's not actually not that bad. But yeah, I have hay fever as well.

Alex Villacis:

To give you an example, I woke up at 8am went to the pharmacy to buy some eyedrops because my eyes were killing me. And the lady the pharmacy said, like, Yeah, you do look terrible. Like, Lady You're giving me the will to live right now. So firstly, for that, but in about like hay fever and living in the Netherlands. So tell the audience who you are and what you're currently up to.

Ro Halfhide:

Yes, hello, everybody. I am Ro Halfhide and thanks for being on the show, by the way. And I'm a musician, an artist, a music teacher and a music producer.

Alex Villacis:

Wow. In the music in

Ro Halfhide:

so basically it's all music. Nice. Yeah, I'm just I decided long ago to to focus on music. And it worked out for me.

Alex Villacis:

That's amazing. And you're getting very different aspects of music from not just your own you're producing and creating in teaching that that's that's great. How did you get here? How, how did you start what put you into this path? And how do you decide to focus on different aspects of music?

Ro Halfhide:

Well, when I wasn't on conservatory the music music theory Teacher He He gave me a he gave me some advice. He said there's there's there's one thing you have to be one secret I can give you he said say yes to everything. You can always say no later afterwards if you don't really like it. And because you never know how it's gonna pan out. It might just be that you think it's not really worth your time and then you you do do it and and it's actually shaping up to be really nice. So yeah, that's an I, I took that to heart. And I said yes to a lot of things. Obviously Now, sometimes I don't I just say no, because sometimes it's you know, you have to also be careful with, with all the different stuff that you do that you sometimes you just thrown out a little bit. But yeah, that's that's how I got into teaching or into playing. Playing at parties or, or producing people just came up to me and I said, Yeah, that's, that's good. I'll do it. Even if it was something that I was a bit insecure about.

Alex Villacis:

So I real yes can do attitude. So basically, yeah, jump out the building and see how you build the parachute afterwards.

Ro Halfhide:

Exactly. That's it.

Alex Villacis:

And from what I hear, you're a classically trained musician. So you went to conservatory?

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, so classically trained. I wouldn't say that, because it's, it's, it was the jazz direction. But the experience was twofold. I really liked the first couple of years, I learned so much, and I got, I got a good vibe out of the organisation out of they had really nice master classes. And yeah, you learn so much also from your fellow students. And, of course, from your teachers. But after a couple of years, I found the organisation was lacking. And I I I grew a bit frustrated. About about the about the school, so I didn't finish it.

Alex Villacis:

Oh, so you essentially took what served you and then decided to step out and do your own path?

Ro Halfhide:

Exactly. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

Wow, do you think it's a different experience? From what I've heard, at least of what I've read from other musicians, a lot of decide to just go get an apprenticeship or learn from somebody or playing on the streets? Or? And that's a different experience? Do you? Are you are you happy with the fact that you went to a conservatory for it? Or do you think today with the experience that you have that learning on the streets would have been more useful?

Ro Halfhide:

No, I think the conservatory was really really useful because you you learn stuff, that is a bit cumbersome. For instance, with with I was I was studying drums. And I learned a lot of technique, technical exercises, that that made me made me made my drumming more precise and stable. And that is something I mean, you can probably extend this to any other field. So so I needed to have the the rigour of of a very good technical exercise and a good technical teacher. To Yeah, to to to clean up my my ham, my drum sound.

Alex Villacis:

Wow, that's great. What? Do you know that movie whiplash?

Ro Halfhide:

I haven't seen it yet. But I've heard of it. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

You have to watch it. So it's I so in preparation for this, I rewatch the movie because I've seen it. I've seen it like seven times, I just needed to, like rewatch it. It's a great movie. It's about these young musician, play by Miles Teller, who goes to these procedures, Music Academy to learn jazz, that actually the drums and he has this teacher who's like a beast of a teacher. He's throwing chairs, he hasn't played into his hands, please makes him cry in front of people. But as the music progresses, he becomes a better drummer. Right? The whole point of the teacher is push him to his limits, break him down, so he can then build him back up as this amazing artist. Did you have any teachers like that on the on your programme or where they all again introduce you mentioned before who had amazing advice? Not not so strong, but there was one teacher that was giving me hell? Yeah, for sure. Yeah. And he was not thrown around any chairs. Thank God. Thank God, that's good. happy to hear that. Yeah, but he could be very dismissive and I really had a hard time with him because it makes Made me feel insecure. So it didn't I don't think it really worked for me. Maybe I maybe I didn't let him go far enough. Like that could be. But yeah, I prefer the, the more nurturer as types. That's probably the reason why I haven't seen it yet because it felt a bit confrontational to to watch the movie. Because I was like, Oh, yeah, yeah, it's been like that. Now, I mean, not not as heavy as that movie, obviously. But yeah, it's a it's a bit tricky. Because if you totally break down somebody, then what is left? You know, it could be maybe you lose. Maybe you lose something important. On the side, you know, something that mate really makes you. I totally agree. And I and I love that idea that do you see the role as teachers more as a guide? A person that's supposed to help you find out who you are? Yeah. And push you? Yes. But in a way that it's not turning into another person. It's growing? what's already there? Yeah.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah. Because I, I just think that music, especially from from for the arts, it is important that that you bring yourself to the table? Because originally, that's how art started, you know, it didn't start with Yeah, I'm not sure. Maybe it's both. But I don't think it really started with a very, was a very strict teacher, but it started with somebody who wanted to be creative and, and just express themselves.

Alex Villacis:

I think that that that would be the core of quite the question of how so this podcast about creative education. So how to teach creative. And the reason I decided to do it is because creativity comes in so many shapes and forms, there are people who are very creative in music, and the people who are very creative in arts, people who are very creative and how they place tax in case by designer or create services and products. And it's about finding a way to nurture that talent and to nurture those interests into maybe you see somebody who is interested in a, but they have more talent for B, how do you help them gain interest in B, just to watch them grow. And I have teacher I've had teachers that I like, as a designer, I went to design school twice. And one was very, very technical education, there was a very artistic education. And in both I had teachers that whose, whose feedback, I didn't want to see, I didn't want their feedback, because I knew I'm only gonna feel like shit about myself afterwards. I'm only gonna ask, I'm only gonna hate myself, I avoided those teachers completely. But then I had others that would tear my work apart, genuinely would tear it apart. But then after talking to them, I will be so excited. I'll be like, yeah, I cannot wait to take what they destroyed and put it back together a better way was just Yeah, like they I felt like they were carving me. They were carving my work, they weren't seeing the rough parts and helping me make it better. Did you have pictures like that, that you felt like there were helping you shape your career in a way that you said, Yeah, they stuck, they stuck with you. So those that stuck in your head? Yeah, for sure. That was the technical teacher. He He gave me all these exercises to to to improve my, my expression on the drums. And I really loved it. I just loved to do the exercises and to go deep into them. And and he was a because we had such a trust relationship. He was he was it was easy for him to to criticise me or to tell me something that I could do better. And also it was, for some reason, because it was so it was a bit of a technical thing. It was like, it wasn't really had nothing to do with taste. You know, I was just like, Yeah, can you play it? Yes or no. And it's, it's more physical thing. And that, to me is like, yeah, that that's less scary, so to speak, than to just say, Well, I don't like the way you play because because it's not sounding like jazz, simple like that. The problem was that I went to a Jess, a jazz Conservatory, but I wasn't well, well versed in jazz. I didn't really listen to it much as a kid. And that is, I found out that that is actually very important. I listened to other music, you know, to, let's say into pop music. So I was interested in that. So I could, I could play all those things. But the jazz was, was hard for me because I just didn't know the language basically. And I was really interested. Yeah. I saw that amount of time ago, I was dating this guy who was play the trombone. I think it's the one that you pull back and forth. Yeah. And he was very interested in jazz, and he wants took me to a jazz show on a date. And I sat there not understanding a single thing that was happening. Yeah, I just sat there and thought, this sounds like a mess. This really sounds like a mess. And then it wasn't until years later that I had one of my friends. He's a real metal head. And I thought, Yeah, I don't I don't I don't get metal music. To be honest. It sounds just like noise. So So rowdy. And he's like, okay, let's listen, I will play you two songs. And I'll explain to you where, where it is where I will explain to you why this is good. I'm like, Okay, I'll give it a shot. I'll try anything once except meth. And then he starts explaining to me like how it's so theatrical and how its musical and how it has, where I should focus and what's below the surface of the superficial what's below the What's he showed me what's below the iceberg. So the the bottom part of the iceberg that I wouldn't see other other way. And that really helped me understand. They do get somebody like that, that explained the jazz to you and help you dissect it, or did you have to do that part by yourself? I had to do that by myself. I noticed there was a vocal teacher that I, I watched her her lessons I really loved to because it was I was allowed to go in it was it was public, for for the it was open for that for other students. And she came from the States. African American. And she really, I could feel that she she she approached the whole jazz thing with her heart. And the way she was explaining everything, it really, that really touched me. So I really learned a lot from her. The way she was teaching other kids because I wasn't in the focal class, I was drunk, a drama student, but I was very interested nonetheless. And and she was able to, to explain some stuff about about jazz, but from her perspective, was more like storytelling. And you know, like, what do you what is the song trying to say? And? Yeah, from that perspective, I could, I could really start to understand it. So I'm also more because of that, probably, I'm also more interested in vocal jazz. You know, like Ella Fitzgerald or any holiday. I love me some Billie Holiday, there's such passion in her voice and he can break your heart. Yeah, and at the same time make you want to be alive.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, true.

Alex Villacis:

I love that. Especially It sounds very, sounds very interesting to me that there was a person who was not directly your teacher. But you were still learning from learning from her, even though she wasn't there to teach you. You were still able to find her. It's the classic paradox of when the student is ready. The teacher appears.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah. And you can learn from a teacher teaching a student. That's what masterclass is all about, right? It's a master teaching a student and then with an audience around it. Grasping what, what is happening between the master and the student. And picking up from that from that, picking up lots of information from that. That's, that's one one of the ways put it that way that a master class can go.

Alex Villacis:

Of course, that's of course, and I'm guessing that also shaped the way that you teach today because you are also in a music education. So what's your what's your teaching style? And how did you get into teaching? It was somebody like you said in the beginning was just you said yes to an opportunity. Somebody approached me and said, Do you want to start teaching and you said, Hell, yeah.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, they were looking for people. And I was like, Yeah, sure. I I'll give it a try. And I have to say I I started out with guitar on primary school. And after a while, I decided like, maybe not next year, because, you know, it just didn't feel like it was something for me. And then they had to convince me that now this is really good. You're really good teacher and and and the kids are doing really well with the kids. And I was like, really? Oh, I didn't know that. You know, I was I was having I was having a big case of the imposter syndrome, which I still have a little bit. That's, do you know it?

Alex Villacis:

I mean, I'm in the creative field. Of course, I know. I would love to see a creative person who doesn't have imposter syndrome.

Ro Halfhide:

Okay, let's get to know,

Alex Villacis:

you as a teacher, what's your teaching style, because if you you were in it, then you want it to pull out. But then people tell you, you're a good teacher that kids like you. So what's your teaching style?

Ro Halfhide:

pretty loose, actually, I try to get out of the kids what they already have. So and I'm quite flexible, when when they have certain wish, I would go with that to try to make make them come up with their own talents, you know, like, find their own enthusiasm. And sometimes it takes a bit harder, a bit longer. So now I have this kid, who was always very shy, and he's still a very shy kid. But I was always thinking, I don't know if he really likes this, you know, I was giving him drumming drumming lessons. And but he kept showing up, but maybe it was because of his mother, I don't know. But I asked him like, What, What music do you listen to and he was like, I don't read or listen to music and you know, fluc so it was hard to get a you know, to get some sort of rapport with him. And then I started I started reading music with him. And for some reason he, it took a while, but for some reason he really he really enjoyed it. I started with that during the lockdown. So that was so we were on zoom calls and stuff. And then reading music is quite nice, because you just share, share the screen, and then they they read from the screen. So that that worked really well. And yeah, I noticed that he became addicted to it to reading he wanted he wanted more and more. And I was like, wow, I would have never imagined because most kids don't like to read, you know, read read notes. They don't for most kids that's like add, I just want to play, you know, he wanted to read notes. Okay, so that that took me a while and now I found it. It's like Okay, okay, let's continue with that. It's just you have to find a way in with with somebody else.

Alex Villacis:

And you're the type of teacher that wants to find that way in. It's not you don't show up and say, This is my classroom. We're going to do this. This is my syllabus know what I have?

Ro Halfhide:

No, I I'm not like that at all. I can't do that. Yeah, until I'm the total opposite of that.

Alex Villacis:

That's great, especially in what ages are your students? You have said kids so far. So

Ro Halfhide:

what Yeah, so far, mostly, it's young kids. So mostly it's primary school. And some kids are a bit older. There's one, the oldest kid is no, maybe 16. She is on as he's doing em MBO. So it's like, sort of a high school kind of thing. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

So I have a weird question for you. Yeah. Is there a song your kids ask you to teach them over and over again?

Ro Halfhide:

Oh, that's a good one. Now, the thing is that the kids listen to contemporary music most of the time. So they they have sometimes there's a song that that most kids want to hear that it's just a song that that that is that is, you know, that's a high pillar. Popular. Yeah. Yeah, it could be. Last year it was man's not hot. Enough, you know it.

Alex Villacis:

Really? Wow.

Ro Halfhide:

I think it was two years ago, maybe even.

Alex Villacis:

I didn't expect that one. No. Every every time every time I heard big somebody playing. That's I told me like I started learning guitar or whatever they were like I had to learn to collide. That song that everybody learns the first guitar to the west collide.

Ro Halfhide:

Okay,

Alex Villacis:

I don't know who plays it. But yeah, I was the first song for because apparently was simple, it had just like two, three chords. So you could do that and learn and learn how to strum.

Ro Halfhide:

With drums, it's just different. It's not just play along with the drum with the drums, you play along to the music. So you're more open to, to be creative and loose with, with with, with with the music, whereas with guitar, you have to really play those chords otherwise, it doesn't sound you know, you have to play the course otherwise,

Alex Villacis:

it's not the song.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah. And as. And as somebody that's working a lot with young people. And as of course, there's these rise of everybody during COVID. Everybody wanted to learn, use their time and learn an instrument. And we also have all these tools to learn instruments you can learn technically, with your iPhone, how to play the piano. Yeah, where do you see education, like creative education going? Do you think this digital platforms are going to take over? Or do you think there will always be the value of a teacher?

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, there's always the value of a teacher because the teacher makes gifts, gifts, the gifts, the pupil a sense of urgency, you know, they have to do it. Otherwise, they let the teacher down. But if it's an app, there's, they the kids know that the app is not getting going to get disappointed or something, it's not going to feel anything. So it doesn't matter, then they really have to do it only for themselves. And that's, that's even for our grown up. That's already hard. But for kids, it's probably even a bit harder, depending on what it is, of course. But, and also music is just something that you have to do together. I mean, it's more fun to get it put it that way. You don't have to do it together. But it is more fun. And you already see it with kids that they ask like, Can I can I stick around with with the next student and maybe play along with him or her? They already asked that because they they just think it's fun to play together.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, because music is this group activity brings. It's a it's a connects establishing that connection. And that's, that's, that's part of it. I connected with a computer sounds very hard.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, then they're just on your own teaching, learning the piano, for instance, or drums or, and that's just studying, it's good, but it's different. And you can study alone. But if you're with with the teacher, you actually also you're not really studying, you're, you're playing together, you're trying to make music together. And that's that's the fun of of the of the short time you have with the teacher every week.

Alex Villacis:

And there's also the fact that the teacher for what you'd said the teacher can pick up on what your unique skill is. They'll give you a more tailored the I'm learning that john doe Linga and I had when duo shows up like close to the end of the day, and he's like, you haven't practised you need to practice I'm like, Okay, do I'll practice. But let's face it at times, I don't care and I just ignore it.

Ro Halfhide:

But you know, that's but with with with Duolingo that's, that's obvious. You know, it's, I've tried it as well, and I've tried Spanish and Portuguese, but you know, I, I just I don't really finish it because I noticed that I learned so much more when I'm on vacation and I'm or when I have a friend who's whose native speaker and you you chat with them, then then then you start really to pick up on the language. You

Alex Villacis:

have teachers all around.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah. And that's the live thing, you know, then you're in a group here or you're you're going out, you're on the beach in Barcelona, you have to you have to know the right words, you know, yeah, you know, I mean, it's, it's more for me that that works more than dentist Duolingo or something? it I mean, it's Duolingo is just a bit boring.

Alex Villacis:

I totally agree. And he also has very weird phrases. The other day, I had to say in Dutch, maybe I am a duck. And I'm like, Okay, that makes no sense. But I think they did to get keep it fun. Yeah, but, um, but yeah, I for me, I have this urgency that I live in the Netherlands and I need to learn how to speak Dutch. I don't need to. I do fine with English, but I wouldn't be able to communicate with people who are not English speakers. Yeah. And I really love what you said that the teacher is a disconnection this human connection and the teacher can be. The teacher can be the conduit to that connection to. Yeah, like that teacher was the conduit for you to connect with jazz with the vocal part of jazz?

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah. Yeah, for sure. Yeah. So I'm the oldest student that I have. That's the girl who is doing High School. Not the last lesson. But the lessons before I was actually doing just bop, bop theory, you know, talking about the, the origin of, of jazz, the different time periods, stuff like that. And because she was interested, and and finding out what she likes about about jazz or other types of music, and just talk talking about it with with the other person. That's, yeah, that's something that that that you can only do when you're in the room with with the other person or, you know, when? Yeah,

Alex Villacis:

yeah. When there's somebody to bounce ideas off of, or to answer your questions. Exactly. Let's face it, that the computer or the screen or what the Internet has unlimited information? Sure. But it cannot provide it the same way that a person can.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, yeah, you have to curate it. Yeah. Yeah, that's to come from a story.

Alex Villacis:

Of course, do you think one day there will be these merge between having a teacher a teacher present? And also at Digital support?

Ro Halfhide:

Sure. Sure. Of course, of course. And that happens already. I mean, I mean, YouTube is, of course, the biggest, the biggest one in that field is easy, because you just search search for it, and you'll find all the other all the videos you need to learn. In my case, that would be to learn how to how to mix or how to how to use a certain programme. Yeah. So I use it a lot. I studied a lot with YouTube. And I think a hybrid forum would be that I would I would learn, for instance, a programming language from from a person. And then also, also use an app for it. Yeah.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah. So the, like I support to, to make sure that you can look over it, and then go to the person to like, introduce you to it, then the app supports you, then you go back to the person for feedback or for get pushed, and so on. Yeah, that sounds great. I think it will be a great way to learn not only technical things like math, biology, science, like the sciences. And then also a good way to learn. Art Design creative professions, was always with the teacher that can support you and also for people who are not neurotypical. Maybe that's a support that they will need. Yeah. And yeah, I think, though, that maybe that's the future finding this balance. That doesn't have to be one or the other, that it can be both that we can have these marriage between the two.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, for sure. Yeah, I think so. I've started out, I did a very, I did a small video for a student of mine. He wanted to know, it wasn't a Corona time. So we were in lockdown. And we were zooming and he wanted to know a certain song and I just made a video for it. So he he could look look it up and I put it up on YouTube so we could look at look it up. I don't even know if he actually watched it but lots of people did. Yeah, that's it. Aaron and people it's one it's it's one of the videos that are most watched because people are just looking for for tutorials on YouTube. That's one of the main reasons to go to YouTube Actually, it's not it's not to go to to watch some some, some video, some some art and artists that they that they don't really know. But if they're looking for for how to play certain songs, then they'll go to that artist and click on the on the video. So yeah,

Alex Villacis:

you know what the weirdest thing and also because of YouTube and the internet, you can learn such a diverse pool of things. Like right now I am very into this guy called the hoof GP who has a channel about how he trips cows feed cows. Yeah, so like, like they grew. They grow because they're made up they're like fingernails are made of essentially the same material. And he has a trim mat and has like a grinder and then he cuts said,

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, thanks. Yeah,

Alex Villacis:

I will probably never use this in my life. No, but it's so fun to learn it. Oh, really? Yeah. And he goes like, okay, those these the court and I was talking to my dad the other day my dad, I studied agronomy. So I was asking him this question that Did you ever do this? He's like, Yeah, I did. And I was like, how do you know that you're not going to cut the corium? Like, it's a feeling thing? Is it a sound thing? And he and he just told me, how do you know the word corium? Yeah, because of the hooked up.

Ro Halfhide:

hooked up, man. Come on.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah. It's so it's so weird, but so entertaining. And I'm guessing that's the journey that these Revolution, the revolution in education is giving us like the access to information. But also the person that can curate that information for you is super important and help you grow and be the guide, like you said, to find out what you're interested in and help you. They help explore that beyond.

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, for sure. is really important. Yeah, and I think I think you need both, you need both to five other people, too, to, to get into enthusiasts to get the answer enthusiasts have somebody else to spark. And also, you also need to go into the books and just look up how it's meant to be stuff like that.

Alex Villacis:

That's great. Well, thank you so much for this has been such a fun interview and an insight into your mind. And I know. Yeah, is there is there anything you want to plug out? tell the audience about? Oh, well, your album.

Ro Halfhide:

My album is coming out on on July 9. And it's, it's, it's an album full of songs that I wrote. And I record it with a friend of mine. And it's really it's sort of a lockdown album, because it's been recorded in his living room, which is really small. It's an Amsterdam living room. So it's like,

Alex Villacis:

I'm making a face because it sounds small. I've never been there. But it's

Ro Halfhide:

Yeah, it's really small. And yeah, he's a he's a good friend of mine. And he's also a songwriter himself. And he's got a really indie bit of a 60s Indy five. And he put that into the songs. So he produced it for me. And I, I finished it up myself, mixing and all that but he made a he made lots of, of art charge choices, like creative choices. Like what, what's what instruments to play, and he could play them himself, of course, as well. So it's a bit of a we did it together in that in retrospect, and that comes out on July 9 at Scott paint the town, and you can just go to my website. www dot ROH health high.com.

Future Guest 1:

Yeah. Thank you so much. I, this has been great. Like I said, it was very enlightening. And yeah, I hope if we talk soon.

Ro Halfhide:

All right. Bye, bye.

Alex Villacis:

Ro and I clearly talked again, because he wrote the music for this show. So that ending was kind of awkward, but yeah, it was. It was early. Don't judge me. I hope you liked the interview. I hope you had as much fun. Listen to it, as I did recording it. Because Yeah, it was just really interesting to hear more about the music field. I'm not in that. So I don't know much about it. Maybe you do. But yeah, let me know. Sign up in the comments or whatever people do on podcasts. I'm not sure. You'll find links to Ros socials and his new album and to everything related to him, his website and all in the show notes. I really hope you enjoy it. And yeah, follow us reach out to us collaborate. Let us know what you think about the podcast. And I hope you have a great day. Keep learning and keep saying goodbye. See you next time.