Do I need school to be...

a creative revolutionary? with Kevin ‘Blaxtar’ de Randamie

May 12, 2022 Season 1 Episode 32
Do I need school to be...
a creative revolutionary? with Kevin ‘Blaxtar’ de Randamie
Show Notes Transcript
This week I have for you an artist, rapper, father, spoken word artist, award winning storyteller, business owner and business educator for creatives. Kevin is the founder of at Cre8tiveRevolution Group. At the Cre8tiveRevolution human centered Creative Capital is developed and mindsets are changed. Through programs on entrepreneurship for creators they challenge the economic status quo and teaching creative the business skills they need to market themselves and profit from their creativity.

On this interview we spoke about:

  • Going from the ladder to the elevator effectively
  • Being an auditive learner
  • How the creative process can translate to business
  • Growing a network of skills
  • Becoming a tech start-up
Want to learn more about Kevin and his company? Here are some links:
Cr8tive Revolution Group’s award winning Website
Kevin’s Instagram
Kevin’s Linkedin
His chat with past guest Chris Locke and Claudia Mayer
His TedX Talk ‘Calling for a Creative Revolution’

Kevin’s recommendations:
Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne
Conversations with God: An Uncommon Dialogue, Book 1 by Neale Donald Walsch
Letting Go: The Pathway of Surrender by David R. Hawkins
The Next CEO by Thomas Keil, Marianna Zangrillo

In an effort to make this podcast accessible, we make transcripts of every episode. You’ll find the transcripts on our website here

Special thank you to Ro Halfhide for the music on this show and to Immaculate Lemaron for proofreading the transcripts and helping this podcast be as accessible as possible.

Want to support the pod?
Follow us on Instagram, Facebook and support the show on Buy me a Coffee. We are currently looking for sponsors, if you know someone or are a local businesses in the Rotterdam area that would like to know about our sponsoring plans, reach out to us here.

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Kevin de Randamie:

If it doesn't work in abundance, and the thing is, creativity is here in abundance. But if we keep offering it on the same platforms to the same people, it obviously going to decrease in value.

Alex Villacis:

Hello friends and welcome back to another episode of join me it's going to be the podcast in which we Alex is going to sit down with creatives and ask them about their journey into the creative field focusing on their education, the teachers who shaped them, the boxer shapes in the movies in general, what their journey was like, if you're somebody who is thinking about entering the creative field, I hope this show will be a resource to you and show you that we all have different paths. And they are all valid. So let's go. Hey, friends, welcome back to another episode to another week. And I am sorry for my nasally voice. I am currently fighting with spring allergies, because they're a thing, and I am allergic. But yeah, I'm very happy to have this episode. Today. It's with Kevin Blackstar. They're on than me. I probably destroyed his last name, but I'm still learning that he is the founder, one of the founders of creative revolution, a community, a group, a company and LLC, I don't know what you want to call it, but it's great. They are essentially teaching creatives, how to improve their business skills, not by just saying, okay, here are a bunch of skills, do it, but by saying, hey, take the skills we already have. Change your mindset, and make your business profitable with what you already own, and allowing you to connect to other people with different skills that can help you. Oh my god, it's so exciting. Here's my interview with Kevin sorry, it's so exciting. Yeah, but Hi, Kevin, how are you today?

Kevin de Randamie:

Hi, how are you doing?

Alex Villacis:

I'm good, you know, chilling, excited to have you here. How is this Monday treating you house this week starting?

Kevin de Randamie:

Ooh, girlfriend. It's a very intense week. It's a very, very intense period. So what makes it intense right now? Like we're definitely in a in a major shift. Like, effectively were transitioning from, you know, a club of creative people trying to help other creative people do a tech startup, which is Oh, yeah. And it's funny, because all we really do is like, you know, scale up our services through technology. But that completely shifts the entire equilibrium of, you know, finance, the type of people you talk to. The legal structures is completely different. So yeah, it's intense. But truthfully, I'm completely nerding out, I have nerdgasm. Like, I love it.

Alex Villacis:

I love that. And I have so many questions about that's gonna try so hard to not get on either my soapbox or bombarded with questions about the effects technology has on creatives because Oh, my God, it's it's a moment in history. I mean, think we're so I mean, I'm always fascinated by the fact that I was born in this time. Yeah. To be able to enjoy all these things. A friend of mine is actually doing a project about what it's like growing up with the Internet. And she's interviewing people who experienced the transition from no internet to Internet. So people in their early 60s people in their in their early. No internet at all. From no internet.

Kevin de Randamie:

Oh, wow. Okay. Yeah, yeah. And

Alex Villacis:

her, she interviewed her mom recently. And her mom said that she remember when her boss got a computer for the office. Yeah. And she remembers, I remember my first email. I know who it was to, I remember what my email address was something that someone named for us today. Like I can send an email from my phone at any moment. For her it was this pivotal moment. So yeah, we can nerd out about technology and how it's changed the world. It's gonna be fun. We love that. Okay, so for the audience of the podcast and the listeners, please tell us who you are and what you're currently working on.

Kevin de Randamie:

All right, so my name is Kevin. My last name is Dr. Ron Dami, which sounds weird in English. That's because it's Dutch. And my artist name is Blackstar with an X and I started my creative journey, so to speak, as a hip hop artist. released my first project relatively late, I was 26 when I did it, but when I did it, I decided to do it on my own label. So I started a label for my first album. And that kind of propelled me onto this learning curve of learning my artistic development and my business development simultaneously. And so long story short that has kind of propelled me. Well, it allowed me to learn more and faster about the business back end of creative industry, which allowed me to help my friends and you know, the people I surrounded myself with, which then became like a platform for, say, creative entrepreneurs and a business school for creators that I started in 2018. And so basically, my thing is, like, whenever I figured something out, I try and make it available to other people who want to do the same thing. And with that formula, I now run a business called the creative revolution group, which is effectively a group of companies that were closed, that work together closely in order to help people, let's say, gain more impact and more income, from the creativity across the spectrum. So that goes for artists, but it also goes for innovators. You know, people in the in the corporate in the corporate world, because we find that entrepreneurs are the artists within the system. So we try and help both. Because it all boils down to the same psychology, the same dynamics, the same thresholds, just different playing fields, so to speak. So that's what I'm what I'm working on now. So I'm, I'm the founder of creative revolution group, and still artistically active in terms of writing, creative content, spoken word, music, stories, but also learning programmes and stuff like that.

Alex Villacis:

That's so cool. You have such a diverse background. And I think it's great that you highlight the fact that many times we see people in non traditional creative jobs, and we think that they're not creative, but they're also creative, just in their own way. I mean, I always say that an accountant can be creative. You I don't think you want a creative accountant.

Kevin de Randamie:

It's funny, you say, like, literally, literally in finance is the only context in which creativity gets to have a dark or sinister connotation, like nowhere else in the in the English dictionary is creativity, something that could be perceived as bad until you talk about finance.

Alex Villacis:

Exactly. It's, it's such that you're right. It's the only context in which you don't want to be creative or seen as a bad thing. Yeah, but I, the first time I heard you speak, I was for the innovation talks with my past guest Chris Locke and Claudia Meyer. Yeah. And you said this phrase that resonated in resonated with me and I've said it so many times before, is that in your in your approach in how you in your practice, as a creative you say, I give you I took the stairs so you can take the escalator and I only ask that you give someone the elevator? I think that's that is so deep. Can you like tell the audience more about that? Because yeah, it's it's a mindset and I think it applies for so many areas of life.

Kevin de Randamie:

It is it is it is. So I think it is it is it goes to valuing yourself, right? It really goes to understanding that the process that you've gone through results in something that's way bigger than you are and depending on where you are, you get to show us you get you get to show it to people you get you get you can basically say give it to other people, but you can help other people establish their goals based on your knowledge or your your experience your intellect. And what happens a lot too much. If you asked me is people keep being reminded of the ladder that they build as though there was no elevator yet. And you know, like even though there are there are literally no building building elevators. The frame from from the the frame through, let me rephrase that. The the glasses through which they are viewed, usually by the people that have known for a long time, will always or will oftentimes be That ladder. Whereas you shift your your perspective. And you're actually doing the elevators and you actually helping people get on the elevator and you actually explaining to them how to elevate it works. And it's such a powerful thing to realise that I have like a very, very practical example. So we did. For the brain works Academy we did like a final graduation show. We invited some people from different companies, and our participants would do like a pitch to show the audience how they would be able to be a value to them through their creativity. There was a lady who basically came up with a concept to have the whole crowd sing as though it was a singing masterclass, like it became harmonic and it was gorgeous. So she took her ladder singing classes, she built an elevator, a whole harmonically sound experience for 100 plus people. And based on that, she was invited to come and do that same thing for a corporate event in Germany, so obviously, she said yes, but then, when she was asked how much you would charge for that, she gave them the ladder price, because she was used to doing these types of workshops in primary schools. There, she did like it, let's say 300 euros. So she actually mentioned that same price to the people from the corporation. Right, and I see a lot of people specially creators making that same mistake. And the reverse of it. I see too, I see a lot of people who actually decide you know what, I'm going to start focusing on the elevator and keep putting being pulled back to the latter level of thinking because they they refrain from moving from the space that they are that they that they're from stay there and because he provides a certain kind of safety I guess, and they're with implode their own valium I think that that is something that more people should be aware of this a lot of there's a whole world to be one if we understand to whom we have a letter and to whom we can show the elevator

Alex Villacis:

Damn, that's so true. It's It's so true. And it's relevant because you're right as as creatives we think like okay, I can we think I read this book recently called the value of everything and she the author Do you know what? Yeah, I love when she goes a difference between value and price that we always the week forget that value and price are completely different things that exactly for example, to me right now, I goat doesn't have the same value that it has to a family in Oman to a family no mana gold is the most precious thing in the world. To me, it's gonna be a strange pad that doesn't fit in my room. It's gonna be a burden to them is going to be a gift.

Kevin de Randamie:

So I love you can see us but I love how you look beside you as though there was actually a goat.

Alex Villacis:

And I loved your example that you bring that because it's it's a reality. And how did you how did you get because here really because you started as an artist and then as a rapper, and then as a musician. And then you went to creating this collaborative group like how did you get here? What's your motivation? The where you're learning on the go, did you take courses certifications? Like, what was your journey education wise? Like?

Kevin de Randamie:

I'm an alternative learner. Oh, nice. I listen. Like to me my business. My business school started when I listen when I started listening to Business Radio. Just to get a understanding of the language, the concept of people is kind of like, you know, when you walk around in a new country, yeah, how are you gonna navigate you're gonna try and read something but you're the sound I mean, obviously For those people that can hear, the sounds are basically like you've, for me at least is basically the first type of information that really helped me to steer the situation that I that I encountered. So I started listening to Business Radio and lot a part that and then well, not really podcast at that time but audiobooks and surround myself with, you know, business types that would just talk among themselves, and allow me to kind of be that fly on the wall and that with gather all this information just from the two different perspectives that I heard. That's really how I, how I learned an hour how I got my understanding of, you know, concept like value concept like money and how it's not really worth anything until we decided that it is and the whole, the whole, there's something called the innovation paradox. I don't know if you know, have you heard about that. But to me, it's like, it's such a simple concept and such an incredibly tough problem to solve. Right. And all businesses deal with it. So all of these things start to like, no, like, permeate my brain. And being a creator, I started to recognise the common denominator that every like, all of these things really boil down to a creative process, like all of the things that people consider problems could almost literally be seen as solid blocks and things that stop a flow, stop a creative flow. And that's why we're looking for solutions. Like we're literally trying to create, recreate the liquid flow again. And so reading a little bit, listening a lot, and setting up the business course, the business school for creators. Between these three, I had so many hours of input that it started to, kind of like become second nature, I guess. And, and the firt. The first, the first. I think trick in the book that I applied was the blue ocean strategy. I literally took Hip Hop concerts, left out the music, left out the entourage, the big stage, went back to small spotlights kind of like, like a stand up comedy setting, and has hip hop artists performed that lyrics with no music. And then that became a poetry event. Whereas nobody hadn't really written poetry at that point. And so that was one of those concepts that that we did that really worked. And then I kind of did the same with with business school, like the whole concept of a business school for creatives is almost like a contradiction in terms. Right? So when we started doing that, and we started raising money for it, people started to, like, gravitate to the concept of it, even though it was still hard to do. It was easier to get teachers than it was to get students because entrepreneurs love to share their knowledge. But obviously, we need people to pay for that content. So it's just a lot of experimenting, tweaking and seeing what works. And that's why I'm super happy now. And I feel thoroughly blessed that almost almost 10 years later, we're at the at the brink of launching our first app. And, you know, taking the whole thing global

Alex Villacis:

that's amazing. And I think you're totally right. I can imagine how five most creative creatives are almost allergic to the idea of business. They are we see ourselves as purists as creativity is this pure thing creation noncommercial hammock going to let the client intervene in my process. And yeah, there's this sense of fear almost almost as if making money from your work makes it impure or makes it to commercial to capitalist. And I'm glad that you're expanding this knowledge because there needs to be a balance like there's nothing wrong with paying your bills and if you can pay your bills doing what you love. Where is the sin in that?

Kevin de Randamie:

You know exactly. And I mean, I'll go even one step further, by this allowing yourself to make money off of your creativity, you're stealing time away from your development, because it means you're going to have to take another job, that job is going to pay you by the hour, those hours are not going into whatever it is you hope to develop. So like you're literally stealing time away from your own development.

Alex Villacis:

Totally, you're in from experiences that you could have. What I love about your journey, personally, is that many times we see going to university, as or going to a course or taking some type of education. As I look for a certificate, I'm going because I need that degree. But what you're doing is putting yourself in a situation in which you can absorb knowledge and get input, which is what you did you put yourselves in rooms and situations in which you could absorb. And that's exactly the point of the show that you can those situations can look completely different. Do you have from all these inputs for all the sources? Do you have any anybody to use as a teacher or as a mentor that impacted you for good reasons? Or for bad reasons? Or somebody that you're like, who's the voice that you hear in the back of your head when you have to make a decision or a choice? Who do you go to?

Kevin de Randamie:

That's a good one. Actually, I go to spiritual teachers more than business teachers. So for instance, this American pastor called TD Jakes, like when I was when I came to write it down, I moved to write it down from Amsterdam. When I came here, I was literally up shits Creek. It was a rock bottom moment, one of the, let's say, three in my life, you know, because one is my version of, of course, you know, so I listened a lot to TD Jakes. And that has really given me the faith to move forward. But also, it's not just faith or blind faith, social confidence. And I realised that everything is in the mind, right? Like, when I struggle with something, it is me telling my mind that I struggle with it. And it's my mind actively seeking proof of that notion. Right? Like I remember one of the one of the I think, key moments in that development was I had a whole stack of blue envelopes. Now in the Netherlands, people know that blue envelopes come from the tax revenue service, right.

Alex Villacis:

Those envelopes you know,

Kevin de Randamie:

most people do well, I had a whole stack of them and yeah, yeah, account for accountant means work. So I had a whole stack of them. And I had absolutely no money, no income, I sold my car. My daughter was about a year or two years old. So it was really struggling. So I was looking at the stack. And I was literally asking God out loud what am I going to do with this? And then I heard the voice say, burn it. And the funniest thing the resistance that I felt in my body, just by the notion of burning blue paper. Right, the resistance I felt like it was almost sickening right so it like it just it just kept repeating itself burn it. So I did and the catharsis that was released in my in my mind in my body was so massive that I only then understood how strong and how powerful all of these thoughts really are like they can literally block you from beautiful opportunities. Obviously I didn't solve anything in that moment. It's not like my dad was you know, wiped out however, it did release affair. me like I got rid of the fear. And so we asked me what what voice Do I hear in my head is probably probably TD Jakes is voice more than any, any one teacher.

Alex Villacis:

That sounds like such a true One powerful moment. Yeah, just and if I was I wasn't this other pot these podcasts the other day, and it was about the saying in, in Islam, which these each says, Trust God, but tie your camel it's so good. It was, it's, and it's basically trust God that everything will be solved but do everything in your power to do everything first. Yeah, sometimes that's going to be just taking a beat or letting the emotion come out. So you can be in a position to accept what's come comes next. Yeah. And you know what my therapist because I go to therapy has said that so much that we are our brains are wired to hold on to negative experiences. And it's a bullet. It's evolutionary. So we tasted something that tasted weird. And we have to remember to survive. Don't eat the person mushroom, if it tasted funny was for a reason don't need it again. Exactly. And we always look for this confirmations of negative things. It's it's survival. So when something positive comes in it we almost rejected. It's like, are you telling me that this mushroom that looks exactly the same? It's not tasty? Yeah. Don't trust it.

Kevin de Randamie:

Yeah, exactly. That's a very powerful example.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah. And we need those moments of catharsis to be like, Okay, now I'm ready for something new. It's like, I'm ready for the next step. Yeah. Sometimes next step is going to be really small, sometimes is gonna be really big. Just gonna be

Kevin de Randamie:

I found it, it also works works the other way around. So for instance, I wrote, oh, I write spoken word. You no pieces, and they perform them. And in that circuit, in that circuit of poetry performance, you don't make you're not gonna make a lot of money, you're gonna make like, 3000 euro for performance in the small venue? Well, I didn't. Then I figured out that doing the exact same thing, spending the exact amount of time in a different venue would get me like, 10,000 euros. And then when, once I figure that out, then you get this endorphin rush, right, like, Oh, my God. Like, we're gonna do that again. So then, so then you like, you start to rewire your brain? Like, we love spoken word jabs for corporations. Right? We love them. Sure. Bring them on. Yeah, let's more more, please more. And based on that, I think at this point in time, I think about maybe I did about 30, or 35. You know, and you just made, like, a tonne of money, like, literally a tonne of money, based on a skill that I acquired when I was 16. And then, in that surrounding that I've been in was always seen, as you know, as nice, it's just, it's your hobby, just just don't quit your day job. Which now, you know, like, one single job is worth two months pay. Right? So I love it, how are how we can actually rewire ourselves, in order to strategically point us in the direction that we want to go in. And going back to what creators and creative people learn these days is the most minimalist version of that. And the fact that you're a creator. And no, if it means that you can create a piece of art, music or whatever it can also mean that you can create your environment you can create your business opportunities, you can create the share value of your company, right? Like it's all the same thing. It's just that we let Well, a lot of us lack the confidence that we put in our art in our business dealings, which is exactly what what we train for, like we do three day seminars, which effectively are about business but you know, really, if you're really serious, and we really look what are the working components of it, it's therapy is literally unlearning a bunch of stuff that you've learned it doesn't serve you anymore.

Alex Villacis:

Hey, friends, it's Alex just interrupting this conversation to remind you that in order to have the optimal experience and enjoy all the links in the show notes, you can subscribe to the show on any platform. you're using to listen to this podcast. And yeah, it supports the show it will improve that algorithm for you. So he would show you more shows like this one that you will potentially like. And if you wish to support the show, you can follow us on social media, all the links are in the show notes as well as a link to buy me a coffee, which, yes, will help pay for the hosting. And I also love coffee. But enough, my babble, let's get back to the show. Well, so the call failed your listener, but it happens. This is real podcasting life, we don't hide our mistakes. We say, hey, it happened. I'll try my darndest to enjoy these moments. But it's so hard. But before the call Falcon was telling us about why they have been a business workshops to bring this take away this fear from creatives that if you're creative, you're not a business person. And if you're a business person, no creative. So can you tell us more about that?

Kevin de Randamie:

Yeah, sure. So we call them creative business leadership. And the idea is that we have this working definition for creativity, which is somewhat, I guess, confrontational to some. But it says creativity is the capacity to cause or discover a desired outcome. So what this does, is it takes away the function of making, right, it's not just about what you can make, if you can make it basically as great means you don't necessarily need other people. But for the say, to enhance the scale of your work, right, the minute you don't want to paint, a canvas, but a mural, you probably going to need some scaffolding, some other people to help you etcetera. So the scale of a word says something about how many hands and then brains and eyes we need. So when you when you consider creativity, something that helps you to cause a desired outcome. Now I can ask you to draw a banana. And when you do draw a banana, then whose banana is that? Is that your bananas? Is mine off? Is it our or is it our banana? Right? So from that moment on, it becomes a matter of guiding people to put their creativity in line with yours in order to get to this desired outcome. And that's the effectiveness effectively, that's leadership. Like, helping people to understand the goal that we're all working towards. And so many people, especially in the creative field, consider themselves unique and at what they're doing. And many, I mean, we're all unique, but we don't always do unique things. Because, you know, generally speaking, musicians make music, right? It's the type of music they make that that differs, but we all need to listen to it, like it doesn't apply to another set of organs, for instance. So in the bigger picture, we do this, we do similar things. To understand how what it is that you do adds value to somebody else starts to create like a like an ecosystem where people help each other work with each other and also understand their part in it and how their ownership of it relates to the impact it has and the income it provides. So, you know, we have better conversations at the offset of a project rather than when the whole project is done. And we start to divide hopefully profits or income, but usually costs and credits. Right. And in order to prevent that from happening, we have the conversation at the offset like anything at the beginning. This is what I'm looking at. This is my vision. So we use Canvas, you know, like the business model canvas and value proposition canvas, all these these typical business tools. We've changed the language a little bit to help people go from this cloud of 101 ideas to Okay, these are actually the structure and building blocks of what I'm trying to do and it it needs to would be something like each of these building blocks need to be able to communicate, I need to be able to communicate to somebody else who can then add their two cents to it and add their value to it. So that's what we do in these three days. And so what you see is that it's, somebody called it she had a beautiful word for, of a guy that it wasn't confrontational it was. I'm gonna, I'm gonna catch it later. But something along the lines of, you know, really being confronted with a whole bunch of things that are so basic, that you kind of ashamed that you never really realised it. Right? Like all of these things you've learned that you need to unlearn in order to just be a healthy entrepreneurially. Active creator. And that's why I love doing them. Because, you know, I'm not gonna say they're the life changing, but sometimes they are a little bit in three days.

Alex Villacis:

It sounds like a very mind shifting reality altering three days. Yeah, just because, yeah. I think it goes back to what you were saying in the beginning, it's about recognising your value, that your value as a creative is not only in making beautiful things, it can be in bringing a new mindset, I'm bringing a new idea. It's how I can combine resources. Yeah, sounds like a very interesting three days of being like, Wait, so I don't have the house down every time that I want to.

Kevin de Randamie:

Yeah, and the thing is that it's, I mean, it's not only fun, right? But if you really think about it, so it's really about breaking through structures. So like, if everybody from your entire school year is signing up with the same agency? Well, maybe some of us should choose a different path, right? I mean, it makes complete sense. If all musicians are going to the same labels, maybe as et cetera, like, the loss of, let's say, the market dynamics, the whole, you know, like, demand an offer. It only applies in a closed system. And it doesn't work in abundance. And the thing is, creativity is here in abundance. But if we keep offering it on the same platforms, to the same people, it obviously going to decrease in value. And to understand how we can be free with your talents with your vision, and apply it anywhere I like, I like what what Jay Z said, like, put me anywhere on God's green earth, or triple my worth. You know, like, I really believe that it's like, wherever you go, you bring your creativity with you, you're gonna find a way to add value to people that they had never thought of. You know, and that's just God's gift to you. And that's.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, and that's, and that's a creative process in itself. It's like, how, if I'm in this new place, how am I going to find a network and connections? And how am I going to do this? And breaking out of these are traditional mindset, say, like everybody graduates and goes to work and an agency? What if I go to work, or if I apply for a job in an electric company and see what they what's available there to me, like the competition will be a lot smaller, like everybody goes into screen printing, what if I decide to use the old screens, instead of seeing like how I can reuse the materials, and I think that's the key like thinking in a different way, but also seeing if thinking in this different way is productive? I actually want to ask you about what's next with your company, because you're launching your app, because you have this abundance of knowledge that needs to be spread. I think there's so many creatives that don't have access, maybe because of where they are because of language constraints because of their personal situation. They might not have access to a three day workshop with you personally. So I'm guessing that's why you're making this app to spread the word.

Kevin de Randamie:

Yeah. So it has it has a couple of utilities too. So one is that we want to stimulate the the idea of exchanging value with one another. Right, but in a healthy can stricted way so that you make clear and concise agreements, which is something that many people, you know, today lack, because it's super enthusiastic to just start working. So you're gonna start and then run into the same issue that we just described a couple of minutes ago. So that's one. Second is not too many people have adequate legal representation and or protection.

Alex Villacis:

That is, that is a, that's a thing. That's a thing. We don't like thinking about those things. But that's something.

Kevin de Randamie:

Yeah, that's a definitely. So what we're doing is were building the terms in agreement started to terms and conditions in such a way that they provide legal protection against being underpaid. So that's, that's one, though, I mean, it's better to. And then three is, indeed, there's so much knowledge. And even we've, we've developed something like a creative health monitor, where we can actually say, so there are these five components that generally speaking, say something about your capacity to create impact from your creativity. So those would have to be, let's say, your optimism, the sense of control that you have over your surroundings, the level of knowledge you have about the business, all these type of things, play a role in how confident you are, and therefore how well you fare in, you know, creating impact and income. So we're, we've developed that, I think, four years ago now, and we're still tweaking it. So it's literally like a questionnaire that will give you a report as to how your is called psychometric evaluation. how it compares to, let's say, the average creator. And based on the exact score that you have, you might get recommendations. So let's say your knowledge stability, could be better or as little below average. So these are a couple of recommended courses that you could take in order to have that level. And these are types of creators that you could connect with, because they rate higher on that same variable. So that's how we hope to give people accurate and practical tools to better themselves, create a healthier career, healthier circumstances, and you know, connect with one another.

Alex Villacis:

I have so many thoughts I have. So the first question is, did you know that tomorrow is intellectual property day? Oh, for

Kevin de Randamie:

real? I had no idea.

Alex Villacis:

And I think that's something that actually is covering this legal property saying like you did, this is your intellectual property, you're going to be paid fairly for it. So yeah, coincidences, it's worldly property that I didn't know that was a thing until earlier, I work today. And somebody told me that and I was thought that why do we have a day for this, but apparently, especially for creatives, it's really important because it's the fact that thing

Kevin de Randamie:

should be like a like an international holiday for creators.

Alex Villacis:

It's it's a World Intellectual Property days. It's we don't celebrate as we should I think, I think I think when we think intellectual property, we think apps we think Tech, we think we don't think about creative things. Really, when we think about intellectual property.

Kevin de Randamie:

Well, people who should monetize creativity do actually think about oh, yeah, they do. They

Alex Villacis:

like how do you think this will impact the future of education? Because you're essentially allowing people to build their own curriculum, and to decide to embrace their knowledge gaps, instead of being like, Oh, I don't know this thing. I don't want to ask that question. You're telling them hey, you want to ask questions here so you ask the questions to this the person go,

Kevin de Randamie:

Yeah, it's so interesting. So technically speaking, tools like this could revolutionise education, creative education. However, due to the fact that creative education is largely done by institutions, institutions, are usually rewarded for doing the same thing consistently. Is very Every little innovation happening there. Matter of fact, once if we would really start to measure the earning capacity of people who have been highly educated, it could very well collapse the value or the perceived value of education as we know it. Because people are not educated to earn money, they're educated to learn a skill, which is something that comes from the Industrial Revolution. Right. And we literally have like iPhone numbers. studies throughout Europe, are showing that people who have been educated to let's say, applied university level, all struggle to make money unless they get a job. Yep, this was really COVID. So imagine how many companies went belly up, especially on the creative end of things. So, you know, like, we are at the run the risk, that education is gonna fall so far behind, that even the four years it takes to graduate or like five or six years it takes to graduate could already mean that whatever it was that you you thought was going to be a job doesn't exist by the time you graduate. So creativity is really the only skill that we have that is gonna keep us operational, valuable in the in the economic sense of the word. Because, you know, just job skills is probably not going to cut it anymore. And I'm not even talking about AI, right? Like this is this is just technology, regular technology, AI is just going to expedite that.

Alex Villacis:

That is so true. And we saw it in other points in history and people like if you if we think about it today, a web designer was not a job that existed 20 years ago. Exactly. And as we say, in the graphic design, a letter Centre, which was the person that built the by letter by letter, the newspapers and to have them printed on a gigantic printer before loser who's on my computer, that job no longer exists. Or if it exists, it's a very few people that do it as an art form, but they don't do it as a commercial job anymore. And I think that that's when the creativity comes, it's like, how am I going to take what I know already? How I'm going to transition it to where it's needed today? And how will I keep evolving in the future. And that's a skill that I personally think needs to be used in creative education institutions more, now. Just train us to be the thing that you think we want to be now how trainers to adapt trainers to change trainers to ask questions and find answers. Yeah. It's, it's, it's gonna be like, it's a great revolution, it's an opening and say, like, hey, let's, it's great that you took this path, or that you took another path, how we're gonna bring it all together.

Kevin de Randamie:

Wow. Exactly. Exactly. And so the bottleneck, and so that's one of the things that, you know, I talked to a lot of schools, university, deacons, etc. One of the things that people pay very little attention to, which is a way bigger bottleneck than the actual curricula is teachers. And I'm not talking about, you know, the engaged, super enthusiastic teacher who loves their job. I'm talking about teachers who became teachers, because they actually wanted to be something else, or wanted to do something else. But then teaching, you know, became like, their, like the refuge, which is still a good thing. However, they tend to project whatever didn't work for them onto the students. And that's an issue, because now they're literally demotivating younger people to be entrepreneurial, because they didn't like it, or that they didn't then cut it. And more often than not, I hear from students, especially after they leave school when they feel like they can freely talk about it, that that has had a major impact on them. Because it cuts into your confidence.

Alex Villacis:

I want to say, Kevin, thank you so much for being here with me today. This has been such an insightful interview. I am so happy. Yeah, and I'm happy that I could tell you about like intellectual property there.

Kevin de Randamie:

No, I was unaware

Alex Villacis:

that more you know, so what do you have for the listener so you have any recommendations in the form of books, movies, talks? Do you recommend to? Yeah, just those resources?

Kevin de Randamie:

Yeah. So I mean, for me personally, Blue Ocean Strategy has been like a Bible. And I'm, I mean, I didn't know I was applying it until I read it. Right? It's one of those things, but it makes, it makes the whole thing so clear about how you can be creative add value in ways that people couldn't even imagine. And I think that, to me is definitely key, then, what really helped me out to and which is a completely different book, but the next CEO because I had issues with seeing myself as a CEO or seeing myself as a business leader, necessarily. Because I'm not comfortable with the framing of what a typical CEO is, right. But I do consider myself an owner. And until I find a good CEO, I will probably have to do the majority of that work myself. So reading the book really gave me insights as to say, how to manage your your time, your focus, talk to people build teams, and set standards. And that was super insightful. I did the audio book where I was, I was driving down from Rotterdam to nice in France, and did the whole book in that on that road trip, and it was amazing. Like it was insightful. It was a great trip. It was nice weather so like I have nothing but butterflies in my stomach when I hear the title of that book. On Yeah, I got some so many like, on the spiritual side of things conversation with God by Neale Donald Walsch, it was epic. Stillness, epic, letting go, letting go the pathway of surrender. This is definitely a book that will help you guide balance out, staying calm being centred, and understanding the dynamics that you're going through. Because it makes such a difference to me at least, it makes such a difference whether you're experiencing it, or you understand what it is that you're experiencing. And just knowing that is is grant. So those are three, I think, 343 recommendations I can make.

Alex Villacis:

Thank you so much for your time. How can people find you like how in which social media is how are you? Why would you write if somebody had just five minutes and wanted to learn as much as possible by you? Where could they find you?

Kevin de Randamie:

Great question. Well, the easiest thing is, because it's the shortest handle is Instagram, is at Blackstar. Blacks are with BLAX T AR, underscore, by LinkedIn, I'm pretty active on LinkedIn, try to share as much as possible about about the projects that I do. And then obviously, we have a website creative revolution, which is C R, E, eight, and then tiff revolution, which is a prize winning website, I might add, because we keep being nominated for awards for the design. So kudos to the designers of studios suck mess. little shout out there. Yeah, and well, furthermore, I mean, the name Blackstar be lax ta RT should definitely pop something of mine up on your your Google search.

Alex Villacis:

Sounds good. And I'll add all the links in the show notes. Again, Kevin, thank you so much for your time today.

Kevin de Randamie:

Thank you for inviting me. It was really, really lovely. Do I hope we get to meet each other in person one day?

Alex Villacis:

Definitely. We both live in Rotterdam. I mean, we should.

Kevin de Randamie:

So there you go. You should you should. You should you should swing by the by the office. Or even the seminar. That would be great.

Alex Villacis:

I will. Yeah, we can talk about that. I'm very I'm very excited. I'm like I have to do this. Okay, well, thank you

Kevin de Randamie:

so much, Kevin. All right. Be safe.

Alex Villacis:

So how did you enjoy that because I loved it. I love an auditory learner. I love a self made story. I yeah, I I've just been enthralled by Kevin and his work for a while now since I listened to him on innovation talks with Claudia Meyer and Cleese lock, you might remember Chris was a past guest, you'll find that link in the show notes, as well as everything on how to get in touch with Kevin, if you want to join one of his seminars, I am definitely going to do it. Because let's face it, I'm a creative and creatives need that kind of support. I've also added the books in my reading list, because let's face it, I like reading and I like recommendations. So that's why my show notes are so long. Well, I don't want to ramble too much. I just want to say thank you again, Kevin. And thank you for the insights to you listener, please go check out Kevin because he's a wealth of knowledge. Truly, you can just dive into that knowledge and come out a better person. So definitely go check him out. And as we come to the end of the show, I want to say thank you for joining me on another episode and giving me your time. I hope you're enjoying these conversations. Please subscribe to the show, give it a review or give us feedback. It's always welcome. Are there questions you would like to ask Creatives or do you have somebody who would like to recommend for the show, you can reach out to me on social media or email which is all linked in the show notes. Also special thank you to Anne, Catherine and Marcus for supporting the show through buy me a coffee. I love you guys and I appreciate the encouragement. Also, thank you to Rohan Haida, for the music for this show, and to immaculate Lemurian for her help proofreading the transcripts and helping keep the podcast as accessible as possible to close. Thank you for listening again this week, and I hope to be back in your ears very soon. Until then, keep learning and stay curious. Bye