Do I need school to be...

a coach for teachers? With Christian Kressmann

February 10, 2022 Season 1 Episode 23
Do I need school to be...
a coach for teachers? With Christian Kressmann
Show Notes Transcript

So far on this podcast we have talked a lot about how teacher shaped creatives but in this one we’ll talk to someone who is working passionately to shape teachers. Christian Kressmann is an actor, a PhD title holder, a certified NLP coach who is working to help teachers harness their talents and become impact makers because as we have learned on this show, teachers are in a unique position to shape the future and we sometimes take it for granted. 

On this interview we spoke about:

  • How Chris’ combine passions for acting, science and coaching led him to develop his coaching program for teachers
  • The impact teachers can have on the world
  • The powers and dangers on NLP
  • The role of a coach in helping others

Want to learn more about Chris? Here are so many links:
Website
Linkedin
Facebook
Instagram
My episode on his podcast TEACH! - Der Podcast für Lehrer (in German)
His book (yes, he an author)

Christian’s book recommendation:
Inner Engineering: A Yogi's Guide to Joy by Sadhguru

In an effort to make this podcast accessible, we make transcripts of every episode. You’ll find the transcripts on our website here and if you want to check out my episode with Josh Savage, follow this link.

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Follow us on Instagram, Facebook and support the show on Buy me a Coffee. We are currently looking for sponsors, if you know someone or are a local businesses in the Rotterdam area that would like to know about our sponsoring plans, reach out to us here.

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Christian Kressmann:

While there are some deeper stories behind that I had some health crisis before that, and then I switched my profession in that area, and thought I really want to make an impact. And this is to help people who really make an impact in the world teachers.

Alex Villacis:

Hello, friend, and welcome back to another episode of joining. It's going to be the podcast in which me Alex is going to sit down with creatives and ask them about their journey into the creative field focusing on their education, the teachers who shaped them, the books are shaped in the movies in general what their journey was like. If you're somebody who is thinking about entering the creative field, I hope this show will be a resource to you and show you that we all have different paths, and they are all valid. So let's go. On this week's episode, I am talking to Christian Kuzmin. Yes, I went super German with name because I also speak German. Chris and I met through his podcast because he interviewed Josh savage who was actually on one of our episodes. I'm going to link that down below. And I just love the conversation they had I thought it was super interesting. And I just needed to have him on the show. And we did a little episode exchange. He was I was a guest on his show. And he's now a guest on mind. And I really wanted to have him on the show because we talk constantly about the teachers who shaped us but that then the question came up who shapes teachers? And here like now I have the answer. Chris is one of the people shaping teachers. Crystal supports educators about all things personal growth in his 90 Day coaching programme. In his signature method teach method. He trains teachers to cut their lessons prep time, by half, when back their weekends and become assertive and loving leaders be a practical communication tools from acting and coaching. They get empowered to handle their daily life with ease and joy. You'll find links to his 90 Day programme to his book to his podcast to all his things in the show notes of this episode. I am ready to start. I hope you're too and here's my conversation with Christiane Kuzmin. And we're recording now. Hi, Christine. How are you today?

Christian Kressmann:

Hi. Hi, Alex. Nice to meet you again. I'm so excited for this interview. Thanks for having me.

Alex Villacis:

Me, too. I was in your podcast recently. Well, recently, this episode's coming out in January, and I was in your podcast in October. So yeah, we're doing a cross episode cross podcast thing right here.

Christian Kressmann:

Yes. I'm really thrilled and delighted to make that happen, actually. And so yeah, what what to say? It's been a while.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, it's been a journey. And here we are in this podcasting journey, just collaborating. I think that's great. That's the beauty of the internet that we in collaborating this way.

Christian Kressmann:

It's really is. Thank you. Again, I viewed the stats actually, of our episode. And you really had a great impact in the teaching community. And it really went through the roof with your great insights about, yeah, illustrations and graphic design and all that. So thanks again for this. So I hope I can Yeah, play the same role as you play for my show. That was such a blessing to have you. So thanks again.

Alex Villacis:

I'm so excited. I will definitely link in the show notes below. Although it's in German. That's I think that's the fun part that we did that episode in German. Yes. And

Christian Kressmann:

well, well, what should I say I can talk with a Bavarian or German accent in that show, if you like to, would please the audition

Alex Villacis:

will stick like where we are now. So a little bit about you. You are the owner of craftsman coaching, in which you coach teachers on how to teach better. And this podcast the do I need school to be podcast, it's all about creative education. And like we said, you also have a podcast, your own podcast in which you share these insights with people. So for my audience who doesn't know who you are, please tell us who you are and what you do.

Christian Kressmann:

Now, well, actually, it is pretty simple. In Germany, we have a huge problem in the educational system of the teacher training system. So usually teachers attend school, then they attend university class, and then they go back to school because they want to become teachers. But the problem is at the transitional point where they transition from the from the university level to back to becoming a teacher and the internship or the teacher internship. The problem is that teachers get told him University Yeah, how to exactly teach. You will learn that when you're in your training programme in your teacher training programme. There is a special 18 month programme for that in Germany. But when they arrive in the teacher training, and the supervisors deal with them, they say, yeah, so let's get started. You learned all about teaching when you were in university, and they said nope, they told me I would learn it now. So there's this gap, where student teachers Don't know how to actually teach them no, they don't learn how to actually teach in terms of classroom management in terms of psychological tools that can be applied from psychology itself, or acting or coaching or whatever. And when they arrive in school and kind of are forced to show their skills, they have never learned those kind of skills, because they only learned a theoretical knowledge. So there is a gap between the practical experience of teaching and the theoretical concept of how to do some jigsaw puzzles, or whatever fancy methods they learn in the university. And what I do with my work is to close this gap. So I applied from my own career as a coach and as an actor. And mostly that's it, I also studied chemistry and physics, education, but there was more than theoretical foundation and I had a 10 year experience of being a Coach and Trainer for the adults for the adult world. And the really profound and practical experience of teaching and coaching and learning. And well, then I realised, well, that kind of could be my calling. Well, there are some deeper stories behind that I had some health crisis before that, and then I switched my profession in that area, and thought I really want to make an impact. And this is to help people who really make an impact in the world teachers. So this is my story in very short, very brief. What I do

Alex Villacis:

so many thoughts, it's please I am. It's like the next question I usually ask people is how did you get here? But you have a 10 year time in which you went from physics, like the one from science to coaching to acting, apparently. So. It's like, I want to watch this movie. Like, when is the movie coming out?

Christian Kressmann:

Well, I really received the question quite often. And when they say, Chris, what are you doing? Well, I say, let me put it this way. I am. You know, DaVinci. You know, Leonardo da Vinci.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, I've heard I've heard of him. Nice fella. I've heard no, no, sir. So

Christian Kressmann:

that that is my answer to the question, you know, you know, Da Vinci. And that's it. Yeah, I know. Davinci. Kind of, so he draws the Mona Lisa. Yeah. But he also was a scientist. Yeah, kind of, and an artist. So He manufactured sculptures. Well, yeah. So he did all those crazy things not related to each other on the surface. But on a deeper level, he just followed his passions, his dreams, and applied all the things from different areas into his work. And I don't want to compare myself to the VINCI I'm not that great. I really have not, but I just follow his lead by doing what he loves. And I really love acting. I really love coaching. And I also really love science. So in my work, I combine all those aspects into my work well, I consider teaching as an art as an art seamanship. Also as craft craftsmanship, and also as a science. And this is how I like to address it in my coaching programmes, and in my one on one coaching sessions.

Alex Villacis:

That is amazing. I love that I think many times people like I hate that phrase, those who cannot do teach, like putting teachers on the lower tier, like they couldn't follow their dreams. Like, what if all the things that you're passionate about and all the things that you do lead to teaching? And that's what happened to you? And I think that's great. Thank you. So who were your teachers? Like? Were there people that were influential on you and who guide you on this path, like when you're in a coaching session with somebody like whose voices in the back of your head, reminding you to do your best?

Christian Kressmann:

Well, honestly, I have lots of, I've had lots of great teachers. I'm really thankful for those one, not one of them was my chemistry teacher. Well, I don't know how he did it, but he managed to really capture the attention of all the students in the class, like literally all the students, even the cheerleaders who hadn't been interested in chemistry for ages. But but he managed to do that. And my former girlfriend was kind of that type of girl. So she never was into science, but she really looked forward to the chemistry class with this certain teacher. And that was wasn't a single case, he did it over and over again to, to really glue the students to what he is saying to glue him to glue them to his lips. And he was entertaining and fun and passionate about everything he taught and how he thought taught it. There was one great teacher, I also had a great physics teacher. And maybe that led me to become a chemistry and physics teacher myself, I don't know. But there was one moment where I really suffered from relationship issues. Let's put it this way. And I was young and whatever. And it was in a physics class. But there were only like, 12 Boys, 12 young men, and I was crying. I literally was crying in that physics class. And I was so ashamed of myself that I am a grown man like I was, well, 18. But you're a grown up when you're 18?

Alex Villacis:

Are you? I think that's a question that support for after the story is over? I have a question. But please keep going,

Christian Kressmann:

please, please. And I was crying and I tried. I struggled to hold back my tears, so So with so much effort, but I couldn't. And then he came close to me. And I said, and I thought, fuck, no, I'm gonna get blamed of crying in class and not paying attention to it. But he didn't do that. He just put his hand on my shoulder. So you will get over it. Let's not just mind, your personal life, your professional life. It's okay. And just that one sentence, I don't know. But I wouldn't tell you about that. It now if it hadn't had an impact on me. So there were those certain moments in my life where I realised teachers have such a great impact in how they can shift the path of 1000s, maybe of young people in their growing up in phases. And then on the other hand, had great teachers in my grown up education like my Aikido teacher, my martial arts teacher, or maybe my vocal coach, who's also great, and a great acting teachers are you really fell in love with them? And of course, my coaching method, teacher where I attended his classes for 10 years. Well, just one point, and then you can get on with your question. At the first weekend of that professional education and coaching, I had the biggest headache in my life. I have never had headaches of learning, because before that, but I just loved it. I really was so amazed by the condensed and intense material he provided to us as participants. And yeah, just listening to his stories. Well. And then, well, recently, I had a amazing teacher, he's an Indian yogi, a guru maybe, who only taught by telling stories, and metaphors. And then his rhetorical skills were such amazing, such an amazing level that it just could not help to be amazed by him and learn from him. So yeah, I had really great teachers in my life. And I'm so grateful for them. And then I think they need to mind where I am right now. And what I would like to share with the world, like helping others to be those kinds of person.

Alex Villacis:

Wow, that's so deep. And we talked, we talked about this in your podcast you about the power that a teacher actually has, and that we sometimes don't take into account. And we think like, yeah, it's as a person who's there, but they can have such an incredible influence on not just teaching their material, but it's teaching you about life. Like, yes, that phrase, just separate your personal life or your professional life. It's, yeah, it's something that we should all learn how to do. It's fine to feel your feelings, feel them, don't push them down. But there's a time and a place for it.

Christian Kressmann:

Yes, that's exactly the point. There's a time and a place for this. He didn't meant to shut me up. So

Alex Villacis:

yeah, that's beautiful. And also so such diverse collection of teachers that you had. And going back to what I said, about whether you're an adult at 18 I personally think that it's a asking an 18 year old. What do you want to do with the rest of your life? It's such an unfair question.

Christian Kressmann:

It really is so

Alex Villacis:

horrible. I mean, I know 30 year olds who are still I don't know what to do with my life. I don't know what goes next. I don't know what I'm going to be doing in two years, to be honest. And I'm an I'm an adult, I'm doing quotation marks.

Christian Kressmann:

Yeah. Well, I have an opinion about the reason for that. And I think the issue is within the educational system. And it doesn't provide the room and space and time and also not the guidance from those teachers, to the students to find out what their true bliss is what they really want to follow. And on the other hand, well, you're only 18 Yeah. So there's a whole life, too, to learn. But I think it is important to learn the basics of how you can navigate through those circumstances. And one point really could be learning to learn. Yeah, and not only learning content, knowledge, but learning self reflective skills, learning, emotional skills, how to calm yourself down. And when you're stressed out, whatever. But this opens up a whole other box of

Alex Villacis:

bases to talk about a whole can of worms, I have a theory. Um, so my parents, they are super young, because they had me when they were super young. And I have a theory that they became adults really quickly, because they are responsible for other people. If you are 40, and you're not responsible for anybody, of course, you can continue living your life as a child. If you are 15, then you're responsible for siblings, for parents for yourself, then you grow up faster. And then you have to make those decisions and figure out okay, how do I balance what I want with what I need? And having those moments of self reflection and if you have somebody that forces you, when you're not forced to teach us your puts you on the spot when you're in school? Asked me like, Okay, how are you going to solve this problem that will bring you to a learn how to solve a problem B, knowing how to do research, and C knowing how to do consequences, and grow up at a rhythm that may be appropriate? I don't know. Again, a whole lot of the can of worms. Yes, yes. And but going back to the podcast, what why people are listening to this. I have a question to you about coaching, especially. Right now there is a rise in coaching. The amount of coaches that I see on clubhouse on Instagram and on Facebook is crazy. It's honestly very crazy. I think many of them are con people. To be honest. I don't mean your con first con man. I just think many, many of them are. Maybe you aren't. Maybe

Christian Kressmann:

you're just a pretender. No,

Alex Villacis:

but do you? Well, it is it? Yeah. Do you need school to be a coach? Like what kind of education do you think is necessary to be a coach? Or is there a certification that you need to be a coach? How does that work?

Christian Kressmann:

Well, this tackles things. I know. Really, really? It is a tough question. I think there are certain problems with the naming of with with calling someone a coach. One is everybody can be a coach, because there is no governmental regulation. You cannot be a psychotherapist, you have to do some certification, to become a doctor or whatever. Or a lawyer. And a coach can literally be anyone, because there is no protection for that name. That arises lots of problems. Because anyone can be a coach and there is no quality insurance or assurance in how good he is quality assurance, the right term. I don't know.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, it is it is it just like tackling very hard. It's like there is no quality assurance, oh my god, the recent one, Jesus, it's such

Christian Kressmann:

well. And the thing is, that also opened up lots of opportunities, because this speeded up development of those area with Lightspeed or with the speed of light, because anyone who has an idea got into this and really thought he could change someone. But on the other side, something on the other hand, it also attracted lots of make money quick guys or girls. And, well, if they help someone, I think there's a place for them to be if they make a difference. But then again, if they don't have a kind, some kind of qualification for what they do, they can cause damage to other people. That's nothing to say. And I really want to get deep into this because it is a thing that gets asked quite a lot. My method is called neuro linguistic programming and orange short and brief NLP. In Germany, there is a quality management system for this the German association for Neuro Linguistic Programming or in abbreviations defo NLP, which is Europe's biggest association for this method. And it is it makes sure that it is approved by the government and all that and there's at least a minimum standard for Yeah, how to do this method, this coaching method. And on the other hand, the method itself is not protected, it is open so anyone can call himself an NLP practitioner or a master or whatever. But not I'm an NLP practitioner certified by the Devi NLP like the German association. So there is this nitty gritty, different differentiation going on. The problem with that this is I don't know if the, what is it called? Scientology, isn't it? Is it? It's a church that Tom Cruise church? Yeah, the Scientology Tom Cruise thing? Church? I don't know if it is an association or a church or some other group of people use the same methods like lots of coaches use to change people. And well, would you consider a knife to be to be harmful?

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, yeah. I mean, I see where you're coming from, I see where you're coming from? It's like a knife in itself. It's just a knife. It depends on how you use it, whether it's going to be dangerous or not. Yes, it's and yeah, that that's the thing. I had a I had this discussion with somebody the other day, because we were talking about guns. And he was telling me a gun in your hand is way more dangerous than using mine. Because you have never used guns before I have been using have been around guns since I was 11. So I know how to use a gun. So I see where you're coming from. So NLP is a very, I believe that I know, is a very powerful tool. And there are a lot of people with nefarious purposes.

Christian Kressmann:

Well, the other thing is, it is just kind of a toolbox. Some call it also the language of change, because you can describe how change is happening in other people's, but on the other hand, everyone around the world does does those techniques or methods, but most of the time unconsciously, so they don't know that they are doing it. Example, you have to grant mothers. And one grandmother. Well, when I arrived at her, she asked me hey, how are you Chris? I said, Well, I'm good. Oh, yeah, that's good. Hi, hi, my back hurts so much. And ah, recently, I had to go to the hospital. And oh, well, I'm sorry for that. I had some great experience. And instantly she changes how I feel with the way how she acts or interacts with me. On the other hand, if my other grandmother asked me the same question, Hey, Chris. Hi. And I say well, great. Oh, that's amazing. What are you doing right now with your PhD or with your acting that's so interesting, as well, I did this, this and that, and I instantly smile more. And like, regular people don't know what they do. When interacting is not a problem actually, we just do it but it is funny because other people that we're just being them with someone contact a coach to fix some other person's because they cannot handle the interaction with them. So what I want to get where I want to get it is back to the knife metaphor, it is not the knife itself that is dangerous or helpful. It is just the one who use it use it decides whether it's useful or harmful. And the same applies to all coaching techniques upcycled as I call it, she stuff even acting technique, technology, or like acting skills, put it this way. These are the same methods. We are just humans, human beings. And we function the same way whether we are in a coaching session or in a grandmother grandson relationship or if we are in a acting environment or if we are maybe On a meditation trip, whatever, it is just human mechanics.

Alex Villacis:

Yeah, I love that. It's just human mechanics. And it's true. It's about giving you tools. And I think that's the part in creative education, especially that you get tools, you're given tools and depends on you how to use it. And that's a part of a teacher, what tools are they giving you? Is the tools, just the tools that everybody gets? Or are they taking the time to look at what tools you need, specifically, and how your development is checked out. That's, that's so interesting. This got that very deep, very quickly. I love that,

Christian Kressmann:

oh, well, I'm sorry for this.

Alex Villacis:

I love it. I love when this happens. Hey, friend, it's Alex just interrupting this conversation to remind you that in order to have the optimal experience, and enjoy all the links in the show notes, you can subscribe to the show on any platform you're using to listen to this podcast. And yeah, it supports the show, he will improve the algorithm for you. So he will show you more shows like this one you will potentially like. And if you wish to support the show, you can follow us on social media, all the links are in the show notes as well as a link to buy me a coffee, which Yeah, will help pay for the hosting. And I also love coffee. But enough my babble, let's get back to the show. I want to I want to test connects about you as a teacher, especially how you give feedback or you as a coach or as a teacher, we can do both. And so when you somebody comes to you with looking for a one on one coaching, what's your process? Like? What what type of coach or teacher are you?

Christian Kressmann:

fun, funny that you merged those two terms together, because to me, a teacher is kind of a coach and a coach is kind of a teacher. So I I use the terms independence on which whomever I'm speaking, so because both a teacher and a coach make a difference, supposedly make a difference in the lives of others. So my process is actually well, evaluation first to find out where they are. And then defining what are their visions, aspirations. And of course, what are the costs for not changing. So there's a lot of pre talk going on. And I really like to work quick and fast and spend the minimum amount of time with my clients to don't waste their time, but also not to be unfriendly by saying you cannot walk alone. The path, I just would like to encourage, encourage them to walk as much alone as they can and to have the minimum amount of time together. Because I truly believe in the resourcefulness of people. And that maybe is the in German, we would say, the quarter fatten their breath. Yeah, is it is the same thing. So the red threads of my coaching to remind the people of their own resources and resources, and then apply those resources in different contexts. So for instance, recently, I had a client who really was great at giving speeches at the private environment, like on birthday parties, but she was afraid to stand up in front of children. And don't ask me why she just was afraid that way. So she, she came to me and said, Well, this is kind of weird. I'm moving from my trainee teacher phases into becoming a professional teacher. And I always feel so anxious when I'm in front of a class. And I said, Well, okay, what makes you anxious? And then he Well, I think they kind of beat me up or whatever. So she's doing lots of things in their mind, that are not happening, of course, but we create our own misery in our head. And then of course, we create our own joy in our head. And then, so what would you like to do? Well, I would like to speak the same as I can speak in birthday party, but at birthday parties for my present for my parents, but my presence and and then I was, well, you just told me that you can give great presentations at a different context. Yeah. Okay. Well, that is a thing. So you know how to do this stuff. And she said, Yeah, okay. So let's do it. Right this like this. And this is just a short, short story, but it describes the process so people have reasons horses in a certain area are context of their life. But they don't connect those contexts or those skills to another context, often, awfully. And this is an approach

Alex Villacis:

that is super interesting. I, I haven't looked therapy because of COVID. And every time somebody asked me about therapy, I describe it as my therapist not telling me what to do. I'm just talking to her. And she puts it like, there's a puzzle, like, I'm a puzzle. And she's not putting the pieces together. For me, she's gonna hand me the pieces, but I have to put them together myself. And then she can rotate the puzzle, and she can move the puzzle around to make me see it in different ways. But she's always gonna, she's never gonna do it for me. I love that. And from something you said, the cost of not changing? I think that's a super interesting concept. Can you get deeper on that?

Christian Kressmann:

Yes, of course. To put it this way, I think we always have to pay a price no matter what we do. If we take the left way, we maybe get to the church, or maybe we get to the tree or the forest, whatever. If we take the right lane, we maybe get to the, to the city. It brings us to a different ending position. And we see different things on that road. And it's neither good or bad to take the left or the right lane. But it just leads us to a different ending position. So what does it mean for our own life? If we decide to become actors, maybe we just have to deal with all those consequences that come with being an actor, we have to apply to many auditions, we have to train ourselves. And in interacting, we also have to become resistant to rejection of our works of our castings and auditions. And we have to deal with that. On the other hand, if we don't want to become actors, but teachers, I'm just telling you my story right here. So if you want to become teachers, we have to deal with the consequences that arise from this decision, like dealing with Head Teacher dealing with colleagues that are not enjoying their their work, maybe, or maybe with a shitload of work, to do paperwork or to prepare unnecessary conferences, or whatever. And there are only those consequences of our actions we take. And then the next question is, of course, how would we like to deal with those consequences we have to deal with? And I don't want to say that in the acting field, everything is bright and shiny? No, of course not.

Alex Villacis:

It is not. TV has taught us as much

Christian Kressmann:

just different consequences of our actions. And this brings us back to the point is, if we want to stay the same, if we don't want to move the right lane, or the left lane, if we just want to stay in this point, we have to deal with those consequences as well. Not to change anyhow. So compared to, to being a teacher. I'm not in a school, but just generally teaching because I think you address more than teaching in general than perfect. Then, if we have a problem, like I don't, I cannot speak in front of people I'm afraid of doing so. But I need to speak in front of people because I'm a teacher somehow. At least digitally now, in the post COVID times, I'm afraid of camera. And then we can come take a look and see okay, am I willing to invest into maybe coaching or maybe training not only financially but also from a timely manner? To practice, camera appearance to practice confidence in speaking in front of people? Or am I not willing to do so on both decisions? There are consequences if we like to invest financially or timely, we then have to step out of our comfort zone, we then have to focus our fears we had then have to focus to tackle our fears. And on the other hand, we gain some benefit, of course, we change but if we reject from changing, we still won't feel that fear of speaking in front of audiences. And over and over again. So there's always this thing of if we don't change if we don't decide We decide because well, refraining from deciding is a decision as well.

Alex Villacis:

That is so deep. Thank you. That is so the that's a t shirt. That's very somewhere someone with a tattoo that says not deciding is a decision. I am sure of it with an infinity sign around it pretty sure.

Christian Kressmann:

Oh, that is so nice. So you know what to do now? You have to design one for me, I guess. Oh, yeah. Oh, just kidding.

Alex Villacis:

Oh, but that's, that's so deep. Wow, it's so true. And I think it applies in like for creatives, too. It's it's just whole path or for example, right? Like, I'm a graphic designer, his whole path of going to NF T's. I don't want to take that path. I, by not making a choice about it, I made a choice, I made a choice to not make a choice. And I think not enough people do that work themselves of being like, what do I want to achieve? What do I want to do? And a coach is somebody that will take you down that path ask you those important questions. And I love that you're not the one that wants to create dependency. I think there's a lot of people who want to create dependency of their do you call them clients? Or do you call them coaches? Or what's the I call

Christian Kressmann:

them superstars?

Alex Villacis:

Okay, no. I call them great.

Christian Kressmann:

Well, no, I think I would call them clients. But actually, I would like to, I'd like to work with with friends. Okay, to consider them more in friendly zone. But I think the most appropriate term is humans are human beings.

Alex Villacis:

Okay, when you're working with humans,

Christian Kressmann:

and no. Well, I'm stressing this because it depicts how we function in our inner world. How we'd like to name a thing describes a concept behind that. That's and in

Alex Villacis:

the podcast we have talked about before this idea before that it was this hierarchical thing of teacher students, that the teacher is better than you. So you're a student, you're below it. So I love that you're bringing it up. It's important how we name things. I mean, if you have a stake, and you decide to call it bubblegum, it's still going to be a steak. It's not going to change, because we call it bubblegum. But we're humans, we're not steak. So why do you call something matters? I wanted to ask you Do you know the show Silicon Valley? No. What is it? It's a show on HBO. It's about a bunch of guys who are creating an app and all the things that go into being programmers and creating an app. It's actually really funny show. I bring it up, because there is a character there called Gavin Belson, who is kind of a comedic version of Jeff Bezos mix with the guy from Apple whose name are forgetting, but I shouldn't forget Steve Jobs, Steve Jobs. Yeah, he's a comedic evil version of them. And he has a guru that follows him around. And the guru actively creates dependency of Gavin, make sure to manipulate things around him to make sure that Gavin is always dependent on him because he gets things from Gavin. And I think that is something very nefarious evil sociopath pick from some coaches sometimes to create this dependency. So how do you manage that? Do you have like, an an internal alert for when a client is getting too dependent on you? Or do you make sure to from the beginning, push them to be independent? Who I know tough questions.

Christian Kressmann:

Good question. I love this question. Well, first thing what I aim for with my client work is to get referred and then create more joy in the world spiritually, spiritually speaking, just to help more people because other people are so happy with my work they would say like wow, that is such a great coach. On the other hand, there are some signs in language patterns and in body language that can be observed. But that can be observed when someone is clinging to someone else. And trying to to lean on them. Right now it is a gut a gut feeling. 10 years ago, it wasn't a gut feeling. I I was so cautious about everything. I think I moved on too slow for this because I was too cautious. Because maybe I'm too clingy or I'm too. I'm too. Yeah, I was too afraid of doing something wrong or not helping them properly or creating those Scientology atmosphere of binding those to my work or whatever. And so I repelled people and always repelling them in like, yeah, you can do this on your own. Yeah. And I believe you can do this on your own and done no, no, no, you can do this on your own so. But the energy behind that was was different. I still do that. I still talk to a client who wants to book three sessions. I said, No, we can do it in one session. And then I think you're, you're on your way to the solution, but you don't need me to go full. And then I think it is some energetical mindset work that you just remember in yourself. Stay alive in yourself that you truly believe in the capabilities of other people and a little bit like Morpheus and new and matrix where Morpheus can show you the door, but he needs to step through the door by himself. Yeah, I don't know if you remember the scene where he can wear the key maker opens up the door, and Morpheus brings the key maker in and all that. But he says, I cannot go this way you have to go. And then he says for free. So this image actually sticks in my head pretty, pretty well. So what is the door? I need to show the clients? And how close can I bring them to the store? And then after though, well, they are on their own, but they are on their own as well. They have the capability of being the chosen one, actually.

Alex Villacis:

I love it. And it comes from believing in them. It comes from knowing that they can do it by themselves, or just showing them a path but they have to walk it. Yes. Where do you see the future of education going? Because now we have, we're talking through a computer in the internet. And you have so many options, and you have all these coaches and you have all these courses online? What do you think education will go? Or how will coaching develop in the future? What do you see in the horizon?

Christian Kressmann:

What it knows is my own business and my own coaching and teaching is that people really back for interpersonal, for live interaction. And they don't want all the digital stuff going on all the time. On the other hand, they really enjoy it. So I think it is going hybrid in some way. And the quality rises in the communication. So we we decide more closely with whom we want to spend our time, but the real time. And then we focus maybe on Yeah, spending this quality time with parents and friends and family. But I don't think and I didn't observe it before that, that people all want to go digital and all the way because it is not the same. We only have two dimensions like 2d and 3d and we cannot smell each other and feel the energy and all that. It it limits our experience. And I think the limit of experiences this what makes human life sad, somehow. Or on the other hand, if we have a well established experience, a deep experience of life, then we feel happy, we feel nourished, we feel like it's worth living. But I didn't want to spend all day in front of a computer screen and just chatting with different images. And that is the thing I observed in my own coaching but on the other hand, it still works. I recently attended. What is it a 12 hour an online yogic workshop or yoga workshop 12 hours, not in a row sorry, in three days and three days and then three, three hours, three hours and then oh no, it was nine hours on the third day, anyhow, and there was this atmosphere created where we only locked into this session and we only we had not no chance to leave for, like going through the bathroom and having a drink or whatever, but otherwise would have been shut out. Because volunteers observed us practising and make sure we did it well. And it was kind of a ritual going on there. And like initiation process to call it No, no, it was, was really great, great stuff. But there are there are ways to create that conducive atmosphere that actually is only created in within oneself. Feeling folk or being focused on a thing, like I'm focused right now on the camera, or the microphone, or are you is a feeling that I have inside of me, and is created by myself, not by the microphone, or the camera, or even you? And, and maybe this is a thing that also can happen in the future that people rediscover the ability to focus their attention on a certain thing. So much deeper than they could ever focus before. But I don't know. It's just philosophical. What I'm saying, yeah.

Alex Villacis:

Hate philosophical counselling has been a very philosophical episode. And I think it's, I think it's very interesting that you bring this up, because we do have a problem with attention. Now, we do have a problem that we have 7000 apps on our phone 7000, tabs, open 42 options for lunch. And we are losing that ability to focus on a single thing. I think a couple days ago, I was doing this exercise on Socratic dialogue. And Socratic dialogue requires you to focus completely, because they will ask you not only to answer what he was said, but also can you summarise what the last person said. So you have to be 100% Present. And it was so hard, because instinctively, instinctively, I wanted to check my phone. I was already thinking, Oh, I have to eat later. And then I have to go to work. Oh, so I have to this thing. So my brain was working at 100. But I practice yoga too. So I know what that is that your focus on this one single thing. Even if there's 20 things going on your body, your focus on only your breathing or what a teacher or a teacher of mine loves to say now focus on the outer arch of your left foot. Like what? That's not a thing that I focus on a lot. It's like not focus on the left on the other arch of your left foot. Okay, sir. Or, or have you done a Bikram class? Like a Bikram yoga class?

Christian Kressmann:

No, not yet. Okay,

Alex Villacis:

so when you're doing that, it's very hard to focus on anything other of how hot the room is. It's death. It's their thing. You love it. You feel like a superhero when you leave the room? Because you're like, oh, there's something more than just this horrible heat that I feel. But it's about that it's about focusing on something other than yourself.

Christian Kressmann:

That sounds interesting. I really, I've noticed. So it's not taking place in Asana. Is it? No,

Alex Villacis:

it isn't a signer. That's you can? Yeah, it's it's, it's, it's 39 degrees with 100% moisture in the air. We actually put a humidifier in the room to make it more humid. So wow, it's hard to focus on anything other of how hard how hard it is. But somehow you're also moving your body. And you're also not thinking about anything outside of the room. So yeah, I think I think that focusing will that I hope that it's something that we'll see in the future of education about how to just focus on a single task and be mindful, I think we talked about there's a lot of talk about mindfulness, but not enough about being mindful about a single thing. Just what is this one thing that I have in my hand right now?

Christian Kressmann:

Yes, yes. On the other hand, now is the time that humanity has the technology to address all the problems that have haven't been addressed before because we are connected. Now. We have the internet, we have digital education. And now we can really collaborate on Super Lightspeed with people from India, from us from Germany from wherever and focus on a single problem. Yeah. With combined forces. So yeah. And that is my take on what can be expected in future education? I don't know. I don't feel confident in it in this topic.

Alex Villacis:

It's the future we didn't see a pandemic coming. So clearly, nobody knows what's gonna happen next. But I love that we ended the episode on this note of caution. collaboration of focus and everything. So is there anything you want to promote? Do you want to recommend any books that you think the audience should read about coaching our buddy dedication? And yeah, please tell us about your podcast.

Christian Kressmann:

Oh, well, advertise?

Alex Villacis:

Sure. Just plug it in.

Christian Kressmann:

So everyone is tuning out right now? Oh, yeah, no advertisement, I listen anymore. What shall I say? Well, yeah, I've written a book in German and English, about teaching about the combination, or the bridging the gap between theory and practice in education, that combines all the coaching and acting into teaching. And I also have my flagship product, which is the teaching method coaching programme. It's a 90 day programme specifically designed for extraordinary teachers that want to win back there, weekends and plan. Well, great lessons. And this is what I do. But I don't feel like this is worth recommending on a podcast. If you're interested in it in my work, then of course, you check me out. That is what I usually do that I find something interesting, I look at his or her website. But I what I really would like to recommend is a book. Not from from myself, not my own book, but a book that is called Inner Engineering, a Yogi's guide to well being from Sadhguru.

Alex Villacis:

I love guru.

Christian Kressmann:

You know him and you love him? Yeah, he's so cool. Wow. Wow, well, we did this Yogi exercise treatment, from Aisha from his organisation.

Alex Villacis:

Now, and,

Christian Kressmann:

well, this is a thing that I really would like to recommend, from the bottom of my heart to all those who are listening to attend his Inner Engineering online course. It is really cheap. But an investment that is, although it's so cheap, financially, it is so expensive not to do this inner work. Because then we come back to the starting question, what are the costs for not changing for not doing something? And the costs for not dealing with one's personality, I think are huge in modern society. Because we maybe can handle the outside tools, but not the inside. And then we experienced the only misery we can ever experienced, like the misery that is going on in our heads. So yeah, check, check it out. Sadhguru in engineering, a Yogi's guide to Well being a wellness. That is my true recommendation.

Alex Villacis:

Amazing. Thank you so much. Like how you brought it back to the beginning. It says, going back to the initial question. It's perfect. Very, very well done. You're clearly a podcast.

Christian Kressmann:

Thank you. Thank you. It was really a joy for me to talk with you again.

Alex Villacis:

Thank you so much, Chris. And just like that, friends, we have made it to the end of another great episode. I hope you enjoyed it. This conversation was really fun. We dove into a lot of topics. I don't think we had had this perspective before in the show, and I love that we touched on the impact that a teacher can have. And yeah, NLP like I've not been a huge believer of NLP. But with crystals examples, I really understood more about them. And do I trust coaches now? Not really, I think like our past guests, Samoa, and Chris are both truly one of a kind, caring people who genuinely want to help others and use coaching as a method to help others. You will find an abundance of links in the show notes for this episode, I mean, book, podcasts programme and all the things you'll find them in the show notes. I hope you would check this out and that you enjoyed what you heard today. And yeah, if you're a teacher, or you're looking into becoming a teacher, please check him out. I think he only has good resources. And he his lessons on IG live are also like super insightful. He did one about meth meth metaphors recently that I loved. And yeah, I hope you will check him out. And as we come to the end of the show, I want to thank you for joining me on another episode and give me your time. I hope you're enjoying this conversations and please subscribe to the show and give us a review or give us any feedback you can reach out to us on social media as well. All the links are in the show notes. To let us know if you have questions you would like to ask creatives, where would you would like to learn if you have somebody to recommend please let us know. I am here to make something great for you. That said again, thank you and hope to be again in your ears next week. Keep learning and stay curious. Bye